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Crazy Horse

ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2010 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Killing of Crazy Horse Thomas Powers Alfred A. Knopf: 568 pp., $30 This we know to be true: Crazy Horse, legendary war leader of the Oglala Lakota Sioux, died in September 1877, at Camp Robinson, a U.S. Army fort in Nebraska. Some sources report that Crazy Horse was fatally wounded by a military guard while resisting arrest. Others describe his death as a murder by the U.S. government. How exactly did Crazy Horse die, and what does his death tell us about official U.S. government intentions toward the great American tribes at the end of the 19th century?
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WORLD
June 29, 2008 | Asso Ahmed, Special to The Times
They are known as the "men of the night." The rugged group sits in front of a liquor store in the northern foothills of Iraq, swapping stories and glasses of whiskey as their horses munch nearby. As dusk approaches, they begin strapping heavy cartons onto their animals for the long journey ahead. Their cargo: bottles of vodka and Scotch destined for Iran. Trade has flourished between the two regions for centuries. Some of it is legitimate, some of it not. In the ethnic Kurdish enclaves on either side of the border, many livelihoods are built on the illicit flow of alcohol, cigarettes and other contraband into Iran.
OPINION
March 26, 2006 | Peter Nabokov, Peter Nabokov teaches at UCLA and is the author of "Where the Lightning Strikes: The Lives of American Indian Sacred Places."
JUST EAST OF THE hogback ridge that encircles the Black Hills of South Dakota rises the irregular profile of Bear Butte, a 4,426-foot-high cross between a hill and a mountain. Geologists call it a laccolith, a volcanic bulge that never erupted, as if still storing its power within. To a handful of Plains Indian tribes, Bear Butte remains the preeminent sacred place on their continent. On all sides, the approach to this counterpart of Mt. Sinai or Mt.
WORLD
March 17, 2003 | Geoffrey Mohan
The words stenciled on the barrel of Staff Sgt. Charles Wooten's M1A1 Abrams tank describe the attitude of his 3rd Infantry Division: carpe diem. The soldiers would like to "seize the day" -- this day, not tomorrow or next week. "Get this [war] over with," Wooten said after his crew calibrated the sighting on the tank's thick barrel, an exercise they've done dozens of times since arriving in November. "One minute we're going, the next minute we ain't," the Meridian, Miss., native said.
NEWS
August 7, 2002 | LOUISE ROUG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Toni Bentley's obsessions are apparent on the walls of her Hollywood house. In the eggshell-colored dining room, surrounding a polished mahogany table, hang three large posters. An Art Deco Josephine Baker is framed next to a stripper from the famed Crazy Horse Saloon in Paris. And the opposite wall is dominated by a ballerina, Maria Tallchief, striking a pose from "Swan Lake."
TRAVEL
June 23, 2002
Having visited the Black Hills of South Dakota, I appreciated Susan Spano's article ("In Patriotic Times, Rushmore Calls," June 2) and the importance this place played in American history. I would like to emphasize an important point about the monuments that coexist there. Though Rushmore is a fantastic memorial, we must remember it was built on land that is sacred to Indians. As we view Mt. Rushmore we need to acknowledge the arrogance of beginning a monument to the American presidents in the sacred Black Hills 50 years after Crazy Horse's death.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2000 | VIVIAN LETRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When playwright James Ivory Johnson speaks, a casual conversation inevitably turns into a sermon. "The lesson I've learned in life is that there is a redemption even for those who have fallen," said Johnson, talking about his new gospel musical yet sounding more like the real-life minister he is. "I've seen good leaders and leaders faced with great temptations who don't do so well. Some fall by the wayside." Amen. "We all fall down sometimes, but we get back up again." Hallelujah.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2000 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Disco at the Crazy Horse Steak House? Not only is it true, it's a surprise success story in the year since the nationally known country music showplace moved from its longtime Santa Ana home to a new venue twice the size in the Irvine Spectrum. "The biggest change for us has been tapping into the desires of our existing customers and finding a formula that fits with what the general Irvine Spectrum customer is looking for," said Crazy Horse majority owner Jay Nuccio.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2000
A gospel musical will encore in Orange County with a new plot twist--a real-life movie deal. Promoters of the new show "Is There a Preacher in the House?" announced Thursday their movie deal with Divine Legacy Ltd. Productions, a Diamond Bar-based independent film company that has produced B movies. The independent group has a production budget of about $3 million, spokeswoman Ruth Oram said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2000 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Literate. Insightful. Witty. A songwriter's songwriter. That's the rap sheet on Texas troubadour Robert Earl Keen. So who was that guy onstage Monday at the Crazy Horse who kept spurring a rapturous Irvine crowd to hooting and hollering more befitting a sing-along with Toby Keith's anthem to emotional retribution, "How Do You Like Me Now?!"?
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