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BUSINESS
March 6, 1990 | MARTIN BOOE
Four years ago, Egan L. Badart was a successful, hard-driving real estate agent. He lived with his family in a 6,000-square-foot home with a swimming pool and an acre of ground in Pasadena. He had assets totaling "a little over $2 million." Then calamity struck. A perforated, cancerous colon incapacitated Badart for more than two years. Inexorably, his business and investments slipped away. He lost it all. The cars, the house, the money--even his family.
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SCIENCE
April 26, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
Want to get creative? Get up and go for a walk. People generate more creative ideas when they walk than when they sit, according to a new study published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition. "Everyone always says going on a walk gives you new ideas, but nobody had ever proved it before," said Marily Oppezzo, a psychology professor at Santa Clara University and the lead author of the study . To test for creativity, Oppezzo asked volunteers (mostly college students)
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NEWS
September 17, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Should we write in the nude? That's what Robert McCrum at the Guardian asks. It can, he suggests, get the creativity flowing. Creating while naked is all the rage -- it is, isn't it, if Lady Gaga is doing it? According to an unnamed source in the U.K.'s the Sun , “Gaga has really taken to the idea of naked recording. She has been recording vocals while she's been completely starkers.” Why? “She thinks it makes her voice sound better.” Could being unclothed help all artists make better art?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | Ann Friedman
With every click, every tweet, every share, am I being exploited or am I taking advantage of the digital revolution? This is the question I kept asking myself as I read Astra Taylor's "The People's Platform: Taking Back Power and Culture in the Digital Age. " Taylor makes a thorough case that the technological advances we've been told constitute progress - that anyone can start a blog, that we can easily keep up with our friends (and frenemies)...
BUSINESS
November 3, 2013 | By Morgen Witzel
Creativity is one of the most mysterious processes undertaken by the human brain. Despite its having been studied by everyone from philosophers to neuroscientists, we are still not much closer to understanding what it is or how it works. Businesses are constantly looking to hire creative people, not just for activities such as research and development and innovation, but as thinkers and problem solvers who can unravel the complexities of everyday management. But as a consequence of this lack of understanding of what creativity is, businesses then struggle to manage creative people effectively.
SCIENCE
April 26, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
Want to get creative? Get up and go for a walk. People generate more creative ideas when they walk than when they sit, according to a new study published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition. "Everyone always says going on a walk gives you new ideas, but nobody had ever proved it before," said Marily Oppezzo, a psychology professor at Santa Clara University and the lead author of the study . To test for creativity, Oppezzo asked volunteers (mostly college students)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2011
Skid row may be known for its devastating poverty and homelessness, but the Festival for All Skid Row Artists will underline a different aspect of the downtown community — its artistic potential. Lots of neighborhood artists (those who live and work there) will participate in visual art, music and spoken word as well as a documentation project meant to preserve the neighborhood's creativity. Gladys Park, 6th Street and Gladys Avenue, L.A. noon-4 p.m. Fri. and Sat. Free. lapovertydept.org.
HEALTH
September 14, 2013 | By James S. Fell, This Q&A has been corrected. See the note below for details.
A recent study published in the journal PLOS One found that people who exercise in natural settings enhance their creativity. No surprise then to learn that Sarah McLachlan writes songs in her head while trail running. But 45-year-old singer also takes part in sports that require more attention to the task at hand. I understand you're a fan of surfing. Surfing is my passion because I love being active on the water. It's my big thing, even though I'm still not that good. A friend of mine in L.A., a famous surfer named Israel Paskowitz, convinced me to come out surfing about 15 years ago, and I fell in love with it. Living in Vancouver, there aren't many opportunities for me to surf, so I am just paddle boarding there, but I regularly head up to Tofino [on the west coast of Canada's Vancouver Island]
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2003
Dargis misses a crucial point in her slanted and somewhat snobbish article. Whatever "unchecked ego and rampant greed" was present in 1970s filmmaking, a key difference between those films and many productions of the '80s and '90s was that passionate directors created films that were about something. With the passing of the '70s, corporate thinking stepped to the forefront and decisions sprang mostly (and sometimes exclusively) from commerce instead of creativity. Dargis would be hard-pressed to deny that a majority of films today originate from the corporate boardroom instead of the imagination.
NEWS
December 12, 2012 | By Karen Kaplan
Go take a hike - it's good for your brain. So says a new study that supports something called Attention Restoration Theory , which holds that exposure to nature can replenish our cognitive reserves when they are worn out by overuse. And if you live a modern urban or suburban life, your cognitive reserves are surely depleted: A typical teenager spends more than 7.5 hours per day juggling a computer, cellphone, TV and other media, and the number is surely higher for a typical adult, according to the study: “Our modern society is filled with sudden events (sirens, horns, ringing phones, alarms, televisions, etc.)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2014 | By Mikael Wood
Devonté Hynes was probably the only person at last weekend's Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival to sing about the troubles of homeless New Yorkers and pose for a backstage photo with the pop star Katy Perry. But for Hynes, such contrast is the norm. Beloved by tastemakers for his work in a series of disparate indie bands - including the punky Test Icicles and the folky Lightspeed Champion - the 28-year-old musician has also affected the pop mainstream through collaborations with Solange, Kylie Minogue and Florence & the Machine.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2014 | By Meredith Blake
NEW YORK - Mikhail Baryshnikov's earliest experience in the theater began when he was a child of just 4 or 5 in present-day Latvia, then a part of the Soviet Union. His mother, a Russian speaker unfamiliar with the local tongue, would drag along her young son to play interpreter. Now, after a career in dance, film and television, he's performing the title role in "Man in a Case," a multimedia adaptation of two short stories by Anton Chekhov running April 24 through May 10 at the Broad Stage in Santa Monica.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
It was lost and now it's found, and the world of Orson Welles enthusiasts, which very much includes me, counts itself grateful and amazed. I am talking about 66 minutes of footage from an endeavor called "Too Much Johnson," which Welles shot in 1938, three years before "Citizen Kane" changed everything. Not only had this material never been seen publicly, it had been presumed gone forever when the villa in Spain where Welles thought it was stored burned down nearly half a century ago. Discovered in a warehouse in Pordenone, Italy, by local film society Cinemazero and beautifully restored via a collaboration between the George Eastman House in Rochester, N.Y., and the National Film Preservation Foundation, "Too Much Johnson" is ready for its Los Angeles close-up.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2014 | By Hannah Kuchler
Biz Stone is the other Twitter founder. Not the one who first came up with the idea, not the one with the original investment, but the founder famous for donning a nutty professor costume to introduce the messaging platform to the world in a comic video. In the torrid tale of Twitter's foundation - complete with betrayals and counter-betrayals - he was neither a back-stabber nor the back-stabbed. His new book from Grand Central Publishing, "Things a Little Bird Told Me: Confessions of the Creative Mind," offers a clue about why: He seems to be quite a nice guy. Management books written by nice guys do not abound.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2014 | By Adolfo Flores
Bicyclists dominate the streets at CicLAvia , but the event also attracts the eclectic and unique. Justin Gunn strolled down Wilshire Boulevard. His tricycle, made to resemble a rocket, turned heads and drew photos by passersby. The 39-year-old Los Angeles native built the contraption, dubbed the Rock-It!, with actual recycled rocket parts from a junkyard in the San Fernando Valley. He and his friend, Jason Saunders, owner of Atomic Arts, put the piece together.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2014 | By Adam Jones
Animation giant Pixar uses technology only as a means to an end; its films are rooted in human concerns, not computer wizardry. The same can be said of the new book "Creativity, Inc.," Ed Catmull's endearingly thoughtful explanation of how the studio he co-founded generated hits such as the "Toy Story" trilogy, "Up" and "Wall-E. " Catmull was a 1970s computer animation pioneer (university classmates included Netscape co-founder Jim Clark), but his book is not a technical history of how the hand-drawn artistry perfected by Disney was rendered obsolete by the processing power of machines.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2013 | By Michelle Maltais
It's almost a parent's dream -- being able to let the kids color on a surface without endangering the walls or furniture.  Griffin Technologies and Crayola are releasing a lightweight marker-like stylus called the Crayola Light Marker that translates a young artist's creativity from hand to iPad.  The battery-powered color wand has a glowing tip and doesn't even require contact with the virtual page. (Again, the dream of the anal-retentive parent!) It's all virtual. The iPad's front-facing camera interprets the motions being drawn in the air and showcases them on the screen.  FULL COVERAGE: CES 2013 "We take pride in developing new and exciting technology for young artists ," said Mark Rowan, president of Griffin Technology, in a statement.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2014 | By Adam Jones
Animation giant Pixar uses technology only as a means to an end; its films are rooted in human concerns, not computer wizardry. The same can be said of the new book "Creativity, Inc.," Ed Catmull's endearingly thoughtful explanation of how the studio he co-founded generated hits such as the "Toy Story" trilogy, "Up" and "Wall-E. " Catmull was a 1970s computer animation pioneer (university classmates included Netscape co-founder Jim Clark), but his book is not a technical history of how the hand-drawn artistry perfected by Disney was rendered obsolete by the processing power of machines.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2014 | By Roger Vincent
From some classic Adirondack chairs in front of his colorful new office complex near Marina del Rey, commercial landlord Ned Fox can sit back and watch his property value go up. The developer who made his bones building skyscrapers in downtown Los Angeles during the late 1980s and early 1990s today finds himself with a close-up view of the rapidly evolving planned community of Playa Vista and the young tech and entertainment workers transforming the...
NEWS
March 31, 2014 | By Kerry Cavanaugh
It's that time of the year again, when candidates for elected office push the limits of their imagination and public gullibility with ballot designations. California gives candidates three words to describe their principal profession, vocation or occupation on the ballot, and the freedom to create one's persona and potentially sway public perception leads to some creative designations. However, there are enough checks in the system to ensure candidates don't mislead voters: The choice of words has to pass muster with elections officials and can be challenged in court, which is why we have several recent instances in which ballot designations have been rejected.
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