Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCredit Bureaus
IN THE NEWS

Credit Bureaus

BUSINESS
May 5, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Americans who have been denied a loan, a job or the chance to buy a home because of inaccurate credit reports would get new power to correct the record under legislation passed by the Senate on Wednesday. The bill, approved 87 to 10, marks the first major overhaul of the Fair Credit Reporting Act of 1970, which was designed in an era when the credit bureaus operated with handwritten file cards.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
June 13, 1990 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A House subcommittee and the Bush Administration appeared to be moving closer to agreement Tuesday on legislation that would put greater limits on the private data banks--including Orange-based TRW Credit Data--that keep computerized credit records on millions of Americans. An Administration representative, the Federal Trade Commission and public interest groups backed many of the major provisions of a compromise bill.
BUSINESS
May 8, 2001 | EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a victory for privacy advocates, a federal judge has upheld a proposed government regulation that would effectively end the long-standing practice by credit bureaus of selling consumers' names, addresses and Social Security numbers to marketers, information brokers and others. Industry groups are likely to appeal the decision by District Judge Ellen Segal Huvelle, which was disclosed Monday by the Federal Trade Commission.
BUSINESS
June 30, 2012 | By Kenneth R. Harney
WASHINGTON - In a policy switch that could be important to thousands of applicants seeking low-down-payment home mortgages, the Federal Housing Administration has rescinded tough new credit restrictions that had been scheduled to take effect Sunday. The policy change would have affected borrowers who have one or more collections or disputed-bill accounts on their national credit bureau files in which the aggregate amounts were $1,000 or more. Some mortgage industry experts estimate that if the now-rescinded rules had gone into effect, as many as 1 in 3 FHA loan applicants would have had difficulty being approved.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2010 | Liz Pulliam Weston, Money Talk
Dear Liz: My husband racked up more than $17,000 in credit card debt and negotiated a settlement for $4,000 last year. We received a 1099-C form for $13,000 of forgiven debt, which we have to claim as income. That puts our modified adjusted gross income over the threshold of being able to claim tuition and college expense deductions for our three kids and myself. We now owe more than $11,000 in taxes and we don't have the cash to pay. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Answer: You may think owing an $11,000 tax bill because you saved $13,000 on a credit bill is bad enough.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2010 | Liz Pulliam Weston, Money Talk
Dear Liz: I am freaking out and losing sleep. I got a letter about five years ago from the IRS telling me I owed it money, so I stopped filing my taxes. Now I feel scared and nervous and don't know how to fix this. I have my paperwork and want to file all my returns and see how much I owe. I usually get refunds so hopefully the tax bill won't be too bad, but I just don't know where to start. Should I hire an attorney or just throw myself on the mercy of the IRS? Money is tighter than ever, but I feel that I can't move forward until I resolve this issue.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2008 | David Colker, Times Staff Writer
Why get identity theft protection for free when you can pay for it? That seems to be the attitude of a number of companies, including Lifelock Inc. Known for the TV ads in which its chief executive displays his Social Security number for all to see, Lifelock sells for $10 a month a package of credit fraud alert tools that people can easily set up for themselves at no cost with one of the major credit reporting bureaus, including Experian Information Systems.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|