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Credit Bureaus

BUSINESS
March 30, 2014 | Liz Weston, Money Talk
Dear Liz: How can I get a clear and complete picture of the debts that are hurting my credit score? I have my credit report already. I'm a bit lost and I need to get my credit cleared up to buy a home. Answer: You actually have three credit reports, one at each of the major credit bureaus: Experian, Equifax and TransUnion. Your mortgage lender is likely to request FICO credit scores from each of the three, so you need to check all three reports. You get your reports for free at one site: http://www.annualcreditreport.com.
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BUSINESS
February 6, 2011 | By Kenneth R. Harney
New credit transparency standards imposed on lenders by mortgage giants Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae could affect your mortgage deal. As of Feb. 1, Freddie Mac began requiring lenders to dig back 120 days into your credit bureau files to detect any inquiries ? signs of your applying for credit anywhere else ? and then to check out whether any applications were approved. If they resulted in significant new debts, your lender might have to revise the terms or the rate you're being offered.
BUSINESS
December 14, 1994 | VIVIAN MARINO, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In the next few weeks, after the gifts have been opened, the tree taken down and party decorations packed away, some less cheery reminders of Christmas will linger as holiday bills arrive. Free spenders may find themselves unable to handle their mounting debts. But financial experts warn that falling behind with payments can be expensive and jeopardize future borrowing plans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1990 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Secret Service agents have uncovered a fraud ring that was funneling sensitive credit information out of the TRW Credit Data Division, one of the nation's largest credit bureaus, authorities said Friday. The investigation, conducted with the aid of TRW security personnel, is nearly complete, The Times has learned. Several sealed indictments have been obtained, according to the Secret Service, which investigates credit card fraud.
REAL ESTATE
October 4, 1998 | LEW SICHELMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Home buyers are no longer being penalized for searching long and hard for the best mortgage rate and terms. Now, thanks to a group of lenders who worked to persuade the three credit bureaus to change their method of rating mortgage applicants, you can scout around for the best deals until you are satisfied you can't do any better. "This is huge," says Ginny Ferguson, a Pleasanton, Calif., mortgage professional who led the assault as chairman of the National Assn.
REAL ESTATE
June 13, 1999 | KENNETH R. HARNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When you've made your monthly home mortgage payment on time for years, you naturally assume that you've built up a good credit history. That credit report or history, in turn, can be crucial in helping you borrow money elsewhere, get a job or even get insurance. Yet large numbers of American homeowners are the unsuspecting victims of a little-known but growing trend among certain lenders: Their payment histories are being kept secret, never reported to any credit bureau.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2010 | Liz Pulliam Weston, Money Talk
Dear Liz: My husband racked up more than $17,000 in credit card debt and negotiated a settlement for $4,000 last year. We received a 1099-C form for $13,000 of forgiven debt, which we have to claim as income. That puts our modified adjusted gross income over the threshold of being able to claim tuition and college expense deductions for our three kids and myself. We now owe more than $11,000 in taxes and we don't have the cash to pay. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Answer: You may think owing an $11,000 tax bill because you saved $13,000 on a credit bill is bad enough.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1992 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two Orange County credit reporting services, along with an Ohio company, have agreed to a settlement aimed at preventing breaches of personal privacy, the Federal Trade Commission said Tuesday. The FTC had alleged that the three companies failed to prevent individuals' credit reports from being reviewed by people who had no legitimate reason to see them. The companies--Information Resource Service Co. in Fullerton, CDB Infotek in Orange and Inter-fact Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1992
I would like to clarify a few points and correct some errors made in your editorial (Aug. 9) regarding credit reporting. We support HR 3596, the Consumer Reporting Reform Act of 1992, as reported out of the House Banking Committee and currently pending before Congress. It contains over 40 provisions that would benefit consumers. However, it also provides for preemption of state credit reporting laws existent or pending in 21 states. We favor preemption for one simple reason.
BUSINESS
January 12, 2001 | LIZ PULLIAM WESTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Consumers will finally be able to learn their credit scores--the three-digit numbers lenders use to determine whether to grant loans and what interest rate to charge--under an agreement announced Thursday between leading credit scorer Fair, Isaac & Co. and credit bureau Equifax.
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