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Credit Suisse First Boston Corp

BUSINESS
February 4, 2003 | Walter Hamilton, Times Staff Writer
NEW YORK -- Credit Suisse First Boston suspended investment banker Frank Quattrone on Monday, saying the onetime star of Silicon Valley's dot-com boom may have known that government investigations were underway when he advised employees to get rid of unneeded files.
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BUSINESS
February 1, 2003 | David Streitfeld, Times Staff Writer
The NASD has told Frank Quattrone, Silicon Valley's most prominent investment banker, that he will be the subject of civil charges, sources said Friday. One charge against Quattrone, head of technology banking at Credit Suisse First Boston in Palo Alto, is said to involve "spinning," an activity in which investment bankers allocated shares of prime initial public offerings to key clients, practically guaranteeing them a fortune as the shares soared.
BUSINESS
November 21, 2002 | From Bloomberg News
Mortgage.com Inc. says it's pulling out of a class-action suit against Credit Suisse First Boston Corp. brought on behalf of 200 companies the bank took public and will file a new case. The lawsuit Mortgage.com, now MDCM Holdings Inc., is leaving alleges that the U.S. unit of Zurich-based Credit Suisse Group deliberately under-priced the initial stock offering in an attempt to get kickbacks from investors. With the withdrawal of Mortgage.
BUSINESS
October 27, 2002 | From Times Staff
Massachusetts regulators filed a complaint alleging that Credit Suisse First Boston intentionally misled investors by hyping the stocks of companies for which the firm did investment banking work. In an administrative complaint, the Massachusetts secretary of state charged that bankers at CSFB, a unit of Credit Suisse Group, pressured technology stock analysts to issue upbeat reports on CSFB clients and then pointed to that bullishness when trying to win business from other companies.
BUSINESS
October 22, 2002 | Walter Hamilton, Times Staff Writer
Massachusetts regulators filed a complaint Monday alleging that Credit Suisse First Boston intentionally misled investors by hyping the stocks of companies for which the firm did investment banking work. In an administrative complaint, the Massachusetts secretary of state charged that CSFB bankers pressured technology stock analysts to issue upbeat reports on CSFB clients and then pointed to that bullishness when trying to win business from other companies.
BUSINESS
October 11, 2002 | WALTER HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Massachusetts securities regulators are demanding that Credit Suisse First Boston pay a fine of at least $100 million and clearly separate its stock research from investment banking to settle the state's civil investigation of the firm's practices, sources said Thursday. Separately, the U.S.
BUSINESS
September 5, 2002 | A Times Staff Writer
The House Financial Services Committee, which is investigating brokerage practices during the bull market, on Wednesday sent letters to Credit Suisse First Boston and Goldman Sachs Group asking for information on their dealings with more than two dozen companies. Here are the companies: * CS First Boston: Caliper Technologies Corp., Commerce One Inc., Digital Impact Inc., DigitalThink Inc., EarthShell Container Corp., Enron Corp., Global Crossing Ltd., Handspring Inc., Intraware Inc.
BUSINESS
August 16, 2002 | WALTER HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Securities regulators fined and suspended two senior executives at brokerage Credit Suisse First Boston on Thursday for their roles in a scandal involving initial public stock offerings in the late 1990s. The penalties mark the latest development in regulators' probes into whether Wall Street firms charged improper fees for IPO shares during the tech-stock boom.
BUSINESS
May 21, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Goldman Sachs Group Inc., Credit Suisse First Boston Inc. and about 40 other investment banks won a bid Monday to delay the surrender of documents to investors suing over stock offerings of Internet and software start-ups the banks took public in the late 1990s. Investors had asked the judge presiding over a barrage of initial-public-offering lawsuits to order the defendants to turn over internal documents. But U.S. District Judge Shira Scheindlin in New York denied the request.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2002 | WALTER HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Credit Suisse First Boston has agreed to pay $100 million to settle an investigation by federal regulators into the firm's handling of initial public stock offerings during the late 1990s stock boom, a source said Friday. The payment to the Securities and Exchange Commission and the National Assn.
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