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June 4, 1995 | STEPHEN GREGORY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It seemed unlikely that Olga Cook could get a bank loan to fix her ailing Ford Explorer, its spent engine bleeding oil. Cook, 62, had defaulted on two student loans five years ago while she was studying for her job as a county psychiatric technician. So with great apprehension, she filled out an application for a $2,500 loan from South Central People's Federal Credit Union, the fastest-growing credit union in the south Los Angeles area and one a relative had told Cook might help her.
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NEWS
June 4, 1995 | STEPHEN GREGORY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It seemed unlikely that Olga Cook could get a bank loan to fix her ailing Ford Explorer, its spent engine bleeding oil. Cook, 62, had defaulted on two student loans five years ago while she was studying for her job as a county psychiatric technician. So with great apprehension, she filled out an application for a $2,500 loan from South Central People's Federal Credit Union, the fastest-growing credit union in the south Los Angeles area and one a relative had told Cook might help her.
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NEWS
September 5, 1993 | ERIN J. AUBRY
Crenshaw resident Patrick Bernard said it was the best time he had ever had filling out an application. Bernard, a longtime supporter of efforts to start a community credit union in Central Los Angeles, was one of the first customers to open an account last week at the tiny office that houses the new South Central Federal People's Credit Union. "It's a dream come true," said Bernard, smiling as he turned in the pink card and $35 for a savings account at the teller window.
NEWS
September 5, 1993 | ERIN J. AUBRY
Crenshaw resident Patrick Bernard said it was the best time he had ever had filling out an application. Bernard, a longtime supporter of efforts to start a community credit union in Central Los Angeles, was one of the first customers to open an account last week at the tiny office that houses the new South Central Federal People's Credit Union. "It's a dream come true," said Bernard, smiling as he turned in the pink card and $35 for a savings account at the teller window.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2000
Two sisters and a third woman from Riverside, dubbed Charlie's Angels by the FBI, pleaded not guilty Monday to bank robberies. Tenisha Dawn Norris, 21, and Aiesha N. Hewitt, 22, are charged with robbing a teachers credit union in Anaheim and attempting to rob a Riverside bank. Norris and Rashida Kamilah Hewitt, 18, also were charged with robbing a Riverside credit union. A federal magistrate set an Oct. 27 trial date for the trio, who are free on bail ranging from $20,000 to $30,000 each.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2000
Three women known as "Charlie's Angels" were charged with bank robbery and released on bail pending an appearance in federal court next month, authorities said Monday. Tenisha Dawn Norris, 21, and Aiesha N. Hewitt, 22, of Riverside were charged Friday with the robbery of an Orange County teachers credit union in Anaheim, as well as the attempted heist of a Riverside bank on Aug. 7. Norris and Rashida Kamilah Hewitt, 18, were also charged with robbing a Riverside credit union.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 2000 | RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They're called "Charlie's Angels," and they're the latest addition to the FBI's local Most Wanted list. Sometimes wearing breezy Hawaiian dresses and clogs, at other times in plain overalls or pants, they are three women who have fast become among the most notorious bank robbers in Southern California. Since April, the three have robbed 11 banks and credit unions in Los Angeles, Orange and Riverside counties, federal officials say.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2000 | RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was quite a show but, as did their small-screen namesakes, Charlie's Angels may just have gotten canceled. FBI agents and Riverside police Thursday arrested three women--saying the three were the women whom agents have tagged with the name of the popular 1970s television show--on suspicion of bank robbery. Tenisha Dawn Norris, 21; Aiesha N. Hewitt, 22; and her sister, Rashida Kamilah Hewitt, 18, were taken into custody without incident at their Riverside apartment complex, said Donald R.
BUSINESS
September 9, 1990
The headline on the July 29 story "Federal Credit Unions Offer Safety, Great Deals" couldn't have been better, or more accurate, from my point of view. But what I read in the third paragraph caused me some real problems: "Make sure that its (the credit union's) capital-to-assets ratio is at least 6%, Patrick Keefe of the National Assn. of Federal Credit Unions suggests." I did, in fact, say words to that effect. But those words have caused grave concern among credit unions in Los Angeles and elsewhere.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1992 | DONALD A. MULLANE, Donald A. Mullane is executive vice president of corporate community development at Bank of America
The merger of BankAmerica and Security Pacific recently underwent the most extensive public hearings of any bank merger in U.S. history. The Federal Reserve held four hearings in three states at which more than 150 individuals and organizations testified about Bank of America's service to lower-income customers and communities under the Community Reinvestment Act. Bank of America was both praised and criticized at those hearings. But significantly, very few groups actively opposed the merger.
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