Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCredits
IN THE NEWS

Credits

BUSINESS
May 5, 2013 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
When Tesla Motors reports its first-ever profit Wednesday, much of the money will come courtesy of the state of California. In its zeal to push electric cars into the market, the state has created a system in which Tesla can make as much as $35,000 extra on each sale of its luxury Model S electric sports sedans. That's because the Palo Alto company qualifies for coveted state environmental credits that it can turn into cash. These Zero Emission Vehicle credits could put as much as $250 million in Tesla's coffers this year, according to one Wall Street analyst, and they are a key reason the 10-year-old automaker has survived this long.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 3, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Casa Munras Hotel & Spa in Monterey is offering a late-summer family package that comes with camp for kids and spa and restaurant credits for Mom and Dad. Prices start at $249 a night for getaways through early September. The deal: The Camp Casa Kids Package comes with one four-hour Kids Camp Session in the morning or afternoon Fridays-Sundays. Activities for children are ocean-themed and include crafts, scavenger hunts and camp songs. Camp sessions are good for 5- to 12-year-olds; extra children may be added for $45 each.
BUSINESS
June 15, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - A battle is raging over a California program that grants businesses tax breaks for creating jobs but prevents the public from knowing who got them and why. At issue are enterprise zones, which were established to boost employment in disadvantaged urban neighborhoods and rural areas. California is home to 40 of these special districts, in which about 35,000 companies have qualified for tax credits. Last year they reaped an estimated $700 million in credits - a figure that state tax officials project will grow to $1 billion by 2016.
NEWS
June 19, 1994
I was very interested in the commentary "Go Ahead! Ruin Our Credits" (TV Times, May 29). It proved that I was not the only one annoyed by the networks' practice of squeezing the closing credits into a corner so they could use the extra time to promote upcoming programs. The people who worked on a production deserve the recognition. Also, viewers should have the opportunity to see who did what on any particular production or listen to the theme music instead of irritating promotional chatter.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2012 | By Ricardo Lopez, Los Angeles Times
In California's first auction of greenhouse gas pollution credits, companies paid just a few cents more than the minimum price per ton of carbon, generating almost $290 million from the sale held last week. The state Air Resources Board announced Monday that it sold all 23.1 million allowances available for 2013 at $10.09 each, generating $233.3 million. The minimum price was $10. Additionally, the state sold only 14% of almost 40 million credits available for 2015. That generated an additional $55.8 million.
NEWS
May 23, 1993
Can anything be done about KTLA and KCOP ruining the credits of programs by their folding or shrinking the picture just so their news people can show their faces before the 10 o'clock news? Some of us would like to be able to read the credits. If I intend to watch their newscasts, I will, but seeing the newscasters will not make me watch it. John C. Stein, San Pedro
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2000
I appreciate the fact that Susannah Grant has a very good agent and obviously an even better publicist ("Her Type Is Strong, Not Silent," by Charlotte Innes, April 2), but I'd like to offer a free copy of her final draft to anyone who believes she wrote "Ever After." RICK PARKS Van Nuys The credits for "Ever After" read: "Screenplay by Susannah Grant and Andy Tennant & Rick Parks."
BUSINESS
February 11, 2014 | By Lauren Beale
If ever a property had that déjà vu feeling it's the Studio City estate that just came on the market at $6.25 million. That's not because the Italianate two-story has been listed before. The villa has more film credits than many actors. Fans of “Keeping Up With the Kardashians” have seen the 7,043-square-foot home standing in for the family home in countless episodes. “Melrose Place,” “Entourage” and “True Blood” viewers have glimpsed the seven-bedroom, nine-bathroom place too.  “Chuck,” “NCIS: Los Angeles” and “Chelsea Lately” have used the film location, as well as photo shoots and commercials.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2001
I realize that this is a rather belated response to Sean Mitchell's piece on Nancy Meyers' "What Women Want" ('Getting in Touch With His Inner Cary Grant," Dec. 10), but I felt compelled nevertheless to weigh in on the dialogue in the article on the authorship of Meyers' film. I have no idea of exactly how much Meyers contributed to the original draft by writers Josh Goldsmith and Cathy Yuspa. However, as someone who has followed Meyers' career and her evolution in Hollywood rather closely, I think mention should be made of her history for being very generous with the screenwriting credits on her films.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2010 | By Keith Thursby
Caroline McWilliams, an actress and director best known to television audiences for her work on the series "Benson" and "Soap," has died. She was 64. McWilliams died Feb. 11 at her home in Los Angeles from complications of multiple myeloma, her family said. Caroline Margaret McWilliams was born April 4, 1945, in Seattle but grew up in Barrington, R.I. She graduated in 1966 with a bachelor's degree from Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh. Her first break on television was on "Guiding Light," a longtime CBS soap opera in which she appeared for several years beginning in 1969.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|