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Credits

ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2012 | By Matt Donnelly
Mark Wahlberg is proving it's never too late for an education. Handsome, wealthy movie star or not, Wahlberg is setting out to complete his high school diploma. The actor says his troubled youth derailed him from the milestone, but he'll shoot for his cap and gown online. "I quit kind of during the ninth grade," Wahlberg told David Letterman of schooling in his teen years (watch his full "Late Show" appearance below). The "Contraband" star will use a new Web-based program in Massachusetts to earn an actual diploma (as opposed to the popular GED equivalent)
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OPINION
May 10, 2013
Re "Tesla drives state credits to the bank," May 6 Tesla Motors is an example of an innovative, homegrown California industry. It is building ultra-clean cars and providing employment for 2,800 people in a formerly abandoned car factory. This success is not being subsidized by other car companies. Car manufacturers are not required to purchase credits (which Tesla can sell to its competitors), nor does the state's Air Resources Board establish a price. The credits are entirely an opportunity to provide additional flexibility to car manufacturers to comply with a program whose ultimate goal is to support the commercialization of cutting-edge clean technology vehicles, and ensure that we get as many of them as possible on our roads and highways as fast as possible.
NEWS
January 27, 1991
I'll tell you what really tees me off. It's when the makers of a shot-on-film series (especially dramas) no longer print the beginning or end credits directly onto the film. Instead, they simply flash video-generated credits over a filmed-image. Something is seriously wrong. It's like mixing oil and water, very cheap and tacky looking. Video credits are perfect for a video-taped sitcom, but not for a film. Brian Mesmer, Torrance
NEWS
June 22, 1986
I think it is terrible how the news programs on local stations interrupt the previous show's credits. The credits are shown in a box in the corner of the TV screen. One can not read them because they are so small and out of focus. Many of us still like to read the credits at the end of a TV show or movie. H. Howard, Westminster
BUSINESS
October 14, 2010 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
IMDb founder and Chief Executive Col Needham is a confessed movie nerd. Growing up in Manchester, England, his earliest memories were formed in movie theaters -- seeing "Star Wars" when it was released in 1977, he recalled, when the cinema was "so full that people had to sit in the aisles. " So when at age 12 he got his first computer -- a do-it-yourself kit -- he began using the new technology to keep track of the movies he had seen. "I'd be watching movies and would notice all of these connections between films.
OPINION
April 20, 2012
Who's watching? Re "3 Secret Service agents dismissed in prostitution scandal," April 19 It's nobody's business what others do behind their bedroom doors. If they're employees and their extracurricular activities do not diminish their on-the-job performance, then I don't give a hoot. In the case of the Secret Service agents implicated in the prostitution scandal in Colombia, it's what's between their ears that is in question, not what they do in bed. The real message in all of this is that some in the media and President Obama's opponents are undoubtedly investing great sums of time and money to convince people that these events are somehow reasons that he should not be reelected.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Microsoft is encouraging users to try its Bing and OneDrive services by offering them 100 GB of free cloud storage for one year. Users can earn the storage by signing up for Bing Rewards, a program that gives users credits every time they use Microsoft's search engine. Those credits can then be traded in for rewards, such as gift cards. Microsoft said users who earn 100 credits can redeem them for the free storage with OneDrive, the company's cloud service that was formerly known as SkyDrive.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Star Trek Into Darkness," bursting at the seams with enemies, wears its politics, its mettle, its moxie and its heart on its ginormous 3-D sleeve. Director J.J. Abrams and the crew of the U.S.S. Enterprise try to build a better sequel with action spectacles to get lost in, clever asides to amuse, emotional waves to ride and allusions to terrorism in general and 9/11 specifically. Abrams' first reimagining of the beloved Gene Roddenberry franchise was a stellar surprise in 2009. The casting was spot-on with Chris Pine and Zachary Quinto embodying and embellishing the iconic characters of James T. Kirk and Mr. Spock, respectively.
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