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Credits

BUSINESS
October 14, 2010 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
IMDb founder and Chief Executive Col Needham is a confessed movie nerd. Growing up in Manchester, England, his earliest memories were formed in movie theaters -- seeing "Star Wars" when it was released in 1977, he recalled, when the cinema was "so full that people had to sit in the aisles. " So when at age 12 he got his first computer -- a do-it-yourself kit -- he began using the new technology to keep track of the movies he had seen. "I'd be watching movies and would notice all of these connections between films.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2012 | Elaine Woo
In 1950s Hollywood, screenwriter Joan Scott seemed so adept at turning out tough-guy scripts that she became known as "the girl who writes like a man. " What the studios didn't know was she wasn't the writer. Her husband was. She was married to Adrian Scott, a screenwriter who was blacklisted after refusing to cooperate with the communist-hunting House Un-American Activities Committee. Cited for contempt of Congress, he went to prison as one of the Hollywood 10. When he was released he was unemployable, so Scott became his "front," taking his work to story conferences, keeping track of the revisions and giving him the notes at home so he could do the rewriting.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Microsoft is encouraging users to try its Bing and OneDrive services by offering them 100 GB of free cloud storage for one year. Users can earn the storage by signing up for Bing Rewards, a program that gives users credits every time they use Microsoft's search engine. Those credits can then be traded in for rewards, such as gift cards. Microsoft said users who earn 100 credits can redeem them for the free storage with OneDrive, the company's cloud service that was formerly known as SkyDrive.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2012 | By Matt Donnelly
Mark Wahlberg is proving it's never too late for an education. Handsome, wealthy movie star or not, Wahlberg is setting out to complete his high school diploma. The actor says his troubled youth derailed him from the milestone, but he'll shoot for his cap and gown online. "I quit kind of during the ninth grade," Wahlberg told David Letterman of schooling in his teen years (watch his full "Late Show" appearance below). The "Contraband" star will use a new Web-based program in Massachusetts to earn an actual diploma (as opposed to the popular GED equivalent)
NEWS
January 27, 1991
I'll tell you what really tees me off. It's when the makers of a shot-on-film series (especially dramas) no longer print the beginning or end credits directly onto the film. Instead, they simply flash video-generated credits over a filmed-image. Something is seriously wrong. It's like mixing oil and water, very cheap and tacky looking. Video credits are perfect for a video-taped sitcom, but not for a film. Brian Mesmer, Torrance
NEWS
June 22, 1986
I think it is terrible how the news programs on local stations interrupt the previous show's credits. The credits are shown in a box in the corner of the TV screen. One can not read them because they are so small and out of focus. Many of us still like to read the credits at the end of a TV show or movie. H. Howard, Westminster
OPINION
December 23, 2012 | By Terry McDermott
The critical acclaim for the new Kathryn Bigelow movie "Zero Dark Thirty" has renewed the debate on the efficacy of torture. The movie dramatizes the decade-long effort to find and eventually kill Osama bin Laden. In a riveting opening section, the film obliquely credits the discovery of the key piece of information in the search for Bin Laden to the torture of an Al Qaeda prisoner held by the CIA. This is at odds with the facts as they have been recounted by journalists reporting on the manhunt, by Obama administration intelligence officials and by legislative leaders.
BUSINESS
November 14, 2012 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO -- California environmental officials went ahead with a planned, first-ever auction of greenhouse gas pollution credits despite a last-minute lawsuit filed by the state Chamber of Commerce. On Wednesday, the Air Resources Board manned computer terminals to take bids from some major industrial facilities such as cement plants, steel mills, refineries and food processors. Many companies that emit carbon dioxide, methane and other gases that contribute to global warming were expected to participate in the three-hour sale of so-called cap-and-trade credits.
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