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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2010 | By Keith Thursby
Caroline McWilliams, an actress and director best known to television audiences for her work on the series "Benson" and "Soap," has died. She was 64. McWilliams died Feb. 11 at her home in Los Angeles from complications of multiple myeloma, her family said. Caroline Margaret McWilliams was born April 4, 1945, in Seattle but grew up in Barrington, R.I. She graduated in 1966 with a bachelor's degree from Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh. Her first break on television was on "Guiding Light," a longtime CBS soap opera in which she appeared for several years beginning in 1969.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1986 | DAVID T. FRIENDLY, Times Staff Writer
As president of production for the De Laurentiis Entertainment Group (DEG), Gary DeVore oversees and approves for production dozens of movie scripts every month. "Traxx," described as a "vigilante comedy," is one script DeVore is likely to pay particularly close attention to. He wrote it. That arrangement puts DeVore in the rather unusual position of playing the movie game from both sides of the desk. He's the only production chief who is both a buyer and a seller.
BUSINESS
October 14, 2010 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
IMDb founder and Chief Executive Col Needham is a confessed movie nerd. Growing up in Manchester, England, his earliest memories were formed in movie theaters -- seeing "Star Wars" when it was released in 1977, he recalled, when the cinema was "so full that people had to sit in the aisles. " So when at age 12 he got his first computer -- a do-it-yourself kit -- he began using the new technology to keep track of the movies he had seen. "I'd be watching movies and would notice all of these connections between films.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Microsoft is encouraging users to try its Bing and OneDrive services by offering them 100 GB of free cloud storage for one year. Users can earn the storage by signing up for Bing Rewards, a program that gives users credits every time they use Microsoft's search engine. Those credits can then be traded in for rewards, such as gift cards. Microsoft said users who earn 100 credits can redeem them for the free storage with OneDrive, the company's cloud service that was formerly known as SkyDrive.
NEWS
January 27, 1991
I'll tell you what really tees me off. It's when the makers of a shot-on-film series (especially dramas) no longer print the beginning or end credits directly onto the film. Instead, they simply flash video-generated credits over a filmed-image. Something is seriously wrong. It's like mixing oil and water, very cheap and tacky looking. Video credits are perfect for a video-taped sitcom, but not for a film. Brian Mesmer, Torrance
NEWS
June 22, 1986
I think it is terrible how the news programs on local stations interrupt the previous show's credits. The credits are shown in a box in the corner of the TV screen. One can not read them because they are so small and out of focus. Many of us still like to read the credits at the end of a TV show or movie. H. Howard, Westminster
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Star Trek Into Darkness," bursting at the seams with enemies, wears its politics, its mettle, its moxie and its heart on its ginormous 3-D sleeve. Director J.J. Abrams and the crew of the U.S.S. Enterprise try to build a better sequel with action spectacles to get lost in, clever asides to amuse, emotional waves to ride and allusions to terrorism in general and 9/11 specifically. Abrams' first reimagining of the beloved Gene Roddenberry franchise was a stellar surprise in 2009. The casting was spot-on with Chris Pine and Zachary Quinto embodying and embellishing the iconic characters of James T. Kirk and Mr. Spock, respectively.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
It sounds contrived, and it is. It sounds like a bit of a stunt, and it is that too. It may even sound boring, but that it is not. In fact, whip-smart filmmaking by writer-director Steven Knight and his team combined with Tom Hardy's mesmerizing acting make the micro-budgeted British independent "Locke" more minute-to-minute involving than this year's more costly extravaganzas. Though a dozen actors are listed in "Locke's" credits, Hardy is the only one who appears on screen in this real-time drama that unfolds inside a moving BMW during the 85 minutes it takes construction foreman Ivan Locke to make a nighttime drive from Birmingham to London.
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