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Credits

BUSINESS
March 25, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - Proposed legislation aimed at providing more tax credits to attract so-called runaway movie and television productions back to the industry's birthplace in California won initial approval from a legislative committee Tuesday. The proposal would renew and increase a state tax credit - amounting to as much as $400 million a year - to better compete with generous tax subsidies available in more than 40 states, including New York, Louisiana, New York and Michigan, as well as studios in Canada and Britain.
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BUSINESS
March 24, 2014 | By Tiffany Hsu and E. Scott Reckard
Increasing activity by data hackers has produced millions of victims and one clear winner: the credit monitoring business. Services with names such as BillGuard and Identity Guard report a surge in sign-ups from people anxious to be protected. Nervous consumers worry that the parade of data breaches involving credit card, debit card and other personal information could leave them vulnerable to fraud and identity theft. The latest incident was revealed Saturday when the California Department of Motor Vehicles said it was "alerted by law enforcement authorities to a potential security issue within its credit card processing services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2014 | By Carla Rivera and Kate Mather
In the wake of some wide-ranging breaches in credit card data, Mastercard and Visa this month announced an initiative to increase payment security, including expanding chip technology in the U.S. “The recent high-profile breaches have served as a catalyst for much-needed collaboration between the retail and financial services industry on the issue of payment security,” Ryan McInerney, president of Visa Inc., said in a statement this month....
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2014 | By Kate Mather and Carla Rivera, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
The California Department of Motor Vehicles said Saturday that it was investigating a potential security breach of its credit card processing services, but officials said the agency had no immediate evidence that its computer system had been hacked. The agency "has been alerted by law enforcement authorities to a potential security issue," a DMV spokesman said in a statement. "There is no evidence at this time of a direct breach of the DMV's computer system," the statement said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2014 | By Kate Mather and Carla Rivera
MasterCard said Saturday said it was investigating reports that the California Department of Motor Vehicles may have suffered a breach of credit card data involving online transactions for agency services. MasterCard is “aware of and investigating” reports of a potential breech, spokesman Seth Eisen told The Times. He said the company was communicating with its customers but could provide no details on information that may have been compromised or how many cardholders may be affected.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2014 | By Kate Mather and Carla Rivera
The California Department of Motor Vehicles said Saturday that it is investigating a potential security breach of its credit card processing services, but officials said the agency had no immediate evidence that its computer system had been hacked. The DMV was alerted by law enforcement officials about the possible breach and has "heightened monitoring" of all of its Web traffic and credit card transactions, the agency said in a prepared statement. The agency is also in contact with credit card companies and the vendor who processes its online transactions.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
Sally Beauty Holdings Inc., the Texas-based hair and beauty products retailer, said Monday that a recent data breach affected fewer than 25,000 payment cards. The company disclosed the breach earlier this month, but an investigation by a data forensics team from Verizon is now beginning to provide more information into how many customers were affected. Sally's data breach occurred only a few months after significant data breaches disclosed by other retailers, including Target Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2014 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
Caked with sweat and the desert sand that had been lashing his face over hundreds of miles, Drino Miller rolled his hopped-up dune buggy to a stop. He was nine miles from the finish line of the 1970 Mexican 1000 - a grueling test for man and machine that he was achingly close to winning. It was the middle of the night. He was miles ahead of a field that included racing legend Parnelli Jones and actor James Garner. He had roared past dozens of battered racing vehicles stuck on the torturous dirt roads and non-roads of Baja California, their engines blown, suspensions shot and drivers exhausted.
NEWS
March 15, 2014 | By Carla Hall
As any journalist will tell you, most journalists don't end up the star of a story - let alone a TV show or movie.  (“All the Preisdent's Men” - huge exception; unprecedented story.) But that's pretty much the case with the movie, “The Grim Sleeper,” which premieres Saturday night on the Lifetime cable channel and is based on the true story of tenacious reporter Christine Pelisek who spent months tracking the connections among a series of slayings of young black women in South L.A. that started in the 1980s, stopped then resumed in the early 2000s.
BUSINESS
March 9, 2014 | By Lew Sichelman
It hurts when you've been rejected for a mortgage. Of course, there are many reasons you can be turned down. You may not have been employed long enough in your current job, for example, or you may not make enough money for the property you want to buy. But if you are spurned because of a low credit score, the pain of rejection is sometimes made worse by the reason your score didn't make the grade. Actually, lenders don't give you a reason, per se. Rather, you receive what's called a "reason code": a two-character numeric code and a terse, industry-speak statement - for example, "01 Amount owed on accounts is too high" - as to why your credit score isn't higher.
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