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November 14, 1999
Although the facts in "Label Gets Top Spot With Online Spin" [Oct. 7] were interesting, I believe that the article's analysis was fallacious. It gave the impression that the success of Creed is due to marketing--furthermore, Internet marketing. The bottom line is that Creed sells records because they are good, and their music resonates with a large audience. Garth Brooks' "Chris Gaines" album had lackluster sales for a triumvirate of reasons: People are burned out on him and there is a backlash.
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BUSINESS
June 18, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Taco Bell will test a new Power Protein menu and zero-calorie drinks later this summer as the Mexican-style chain aims to convince Americans that its offerings include healthful choices. The Irvine-based chain will experiment first for five or six weeks in Dayton, Ohio, where it has roughly 40 stores. The company, which has nearly 6,000 restaurants in the U.S., is looking at 2014 for a more wide-scale launch of the new menu and beverages. The Power Protein menu features items that include more than 20 grams of protein but 450 calories or less.  A burrito, for example, features a double portion of chicken or steak with 400 and 420 calories, respectively.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1999 | STEVE APPLEFORD
Creed is big. Creed is loud. The crowds are huge. The sales are massive. But the music. . . . It's small. It booms and it rattles, but that's not nearly enough. At the Hollywood Palladium on Wednesday, Creed demonstrated that for all its high-decibel thunder, there was little of substance to take home once it was over. Not that this quartet out of Tallahassee, Fla., wasn't trying.
BUSINESS
January 1, 2013 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
For the last two decades, video game movies have been so bad that the genre itself has become shorthand for failure. So when French game publisher Ubisoft, best known for its "Assassin's Creed" series and Tom Clancy-branded military games, decided to take a stab at movies, the company didn't search for a Hollywood expert to be its partner. Ubisoft decided to hire him. Jean-Julien Baronnet, chief executive of the 2-year-old Ubisoft Motion Pictures unit, takes a hands-on approach to translating his company's intellectual property from interactive to linear media.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1990
Congressional creed: "We've got what it takes to take what you've got." JAMES STECKER, Los Angeles
BUSINESS
June 18, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Taco Bell will test a new Power Protein menu and zero-calorie drinks later this summer as the Mexican-style chain aims to convince Americans that its offerings include healthful choices. The Irvine-based chain will experiment first for five or six weeks in Dayton, Ohio, where it has roughly 40 stores. The company, which has nearly 6,000 restaurants in the U.S., is looking at 2014 for a more wide-scale launch of the new menu and beverages. The Power Protein menu features items that include more than 20 grams of protein but 450 calories or less.  A burrito, for example, features a double portion of chicken or steak with 400 and 420 calories, respectively.
MAGAZINE
November 22, 1992
I am 17 years old, and I recently read "Welcome to Hell" (by William T. Vollman, Oct. 18) about the events taking place in the former Yugoslavia. I found it very hard to read the article without bursting into tears. It is wrong for any people to die or have to live in fear and poverty because someone believes that they are not fit to live on this earth because of their race, heritage or creed. TINA CARVAJAL South Gate
NEWS
August 5, 1990
Regarding the proposal to have Santa Monica City Council members elected by district rather than at large (Times, July 26): One's ethnic background should not be a compelling consideration in choosing a member of the City Council or any elective office. As a former high school civics teacher, I find the idea inimical to intrinsic principles that must govern all our elections. Candidates must be chosen based on their qualifications, irrespective of race, creed or color. I don't think there are any exclusive ethnic issues to be dealt with by the council, only citizen issues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1994
I am tired of senseless killings, condemnations before trials, fear dominating our lives and the mistrust of every race, creed and color. It must stop. Our children are being hurt by our negative behavior. I think it's time for us to begin to think of some positive things we can do to help our President with the job he was elected to do. I am a Republican. I worked hard for President Bush to get reelected in 1992. When he lost, I was sad. I wrote a letter to President-elect Clinton congratulating him on his victory.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1996
Leticia Quezada was born in Mexico and claims to be a naturalized U.S. citizen. Her article, "Mexican, American as a Single Identity" (Commentary, Dec. 16) clearly shows that she does not understand what being a U.S. citizen means. We immigrants do not just "obtain a document that calls us U.S. citizens," we "pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America and to the republic for which it stands." We do reject all past allegiances and renounce all but the American creed.
SPORTS
December 26, 2012 | By Lisa Dillman, Los Angeles Times
There were trainer Richard Mandella, veteran owner and mogul B. Wayne Hughes … and KISS frontman Gene Simmons in the winner's circle after the $300,000 Malibu Stakes on Wednesday at Santa Anita Park. Posing, pictures and polite chatter. What did Mandella and Simmons have to talk about after Hughes' stubborn chestnut colt named Jimmy Creed won the Grade I race for 3-year-olds at seven furlongs? "I wanted to sing a little bit and see if he might pick me up for the band," joked Mandella, Jimmy Creed's trainer.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik
There's no shortage of big-name stars who have tried to make movies out of hit video games. Mark Wahlberg and “Max Payne.” Dwayne Johnson   and “Doom.” Jake Gyllenhaal  and “Prince of Persia.” There is, however, a shortage of such movies that have succeeded on any level (pretty much  “Lara Croft: Tomb Raider” and, if you count Milla Jovovich as a big-name star, the “Resident Evil” franchise.) Which makes today's news, first reported by Variety, that Michael Fassbender is throwing his  weight behind an “Assassin's Creed” movie just a little bit noteworthy.
OPINION
March 25, 2012 | By Nina Burleigh
On March 14, a Jerusalem judge acquitted a man accused of forging an inscription on a small stone coffin. The writing, on what's known as the James Ossuary, reads "James son of Joseph brother of Jesus. " Its promoters claim that it's the first archaeological evidence of Jesus Christ's existence and that the box once held the bones of Jesus' brother James. Its detractors, including most scholars, say the last two words of the inscription are faked, modern additions to a genuinely ancient limestone casket.
BUSINESS
December 27, 2011 | By E. Scott Reckard, Los Angeles Times
Post-Christmas shoppers hit the malls to buy what they didn't get for the holiday, and they were still looking for bargains. Big bargains. Analyst Marshal Cohen of the NPD Group said consumers who had gotten used to drastic discounts offered during the regular holiday shopping season were expecting the same and more. On the day after Christmas, shoppers were finding "a lot of 40% [off] deals" Cohen said, but not the 70% off they were looking for. "The psychology right now is 'No deal, no sale,'" he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2010 | By Kevin Thomas
"The Disappearance of Alice Creed," a glum British kidnap movie in which writer-director J Blakeson manages to generate tension and some suspense, never rises above the mechanical and contrived, finally lapsing into the improbable. Its three-actor cast is admirably capable and dedicated, but the characters they are playing are stubbornly uninvolving. None, alas, is very bright, even the kidnap victim, and the psychological interplay between the three is trite. Vic ( Eddie Marsan)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2010 | By Michael Ordoña, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Hallo, it's Gemma!" The voice on the line is musical as Gemma Arterton apologizes for the early hour, which the London caller imagines to be "something silly" in L.A. Although the cheery-sounding actress is most closely associated with big-budget popcorn movies (" Quantum of Solace," "Clash of the Titans," "Prince of Persia"), it's her dark, twisty new thriller, "The Disappearance of Alice Creed," which opens Friday, that more suits her tastes. "People are always surprised when I say Lars von Trier and Michael Haneke are my favorite directors: 'But you're so pop!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2001
I believe the new clinic in the El Rio gymnasium should be named after Ventura County Supervisor John K. Flynn. He has led the effort to secure public and private donations to match state and federal funding. Without these funds, the gym would have been only a dream. In this constituent's opinion, this project has been one of Flynn's greatest accomplishments, one among too many to list as he has been in office for 24 years. He has supported the Albert H, Soliz Library by providing access to computers and the Internet.
IMAGE
January 9, 2011 | Janet Kinosian, Special to the Los Angeles Times
If you are a woman who loves to wear fragrance but only if it's not too floral or girly, maybe it's time to expand your choices. This year, why not try a men's scent? Odd? Not at all. Much, if not most, fragrance is unisex. It's mainly the packaging, marketing and strength of the fragrance that categorize it as "male" or "female" and determine in which part of the department store the bottle is sold. "I think it's really quite outmoded to talk in terms of male and female fragrance anyhow," says Mandy Aftel, owner and perfumer of Aftelier Perfumes, an artisinal perfumery in Berkeley.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2010 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"The Disappearance of Alice Creed" opens with a bravura, wordless sequence in which two men plan and carry out the abduction of a young woman. From there the film takes place solely in an apartment and an abandoned building with a cast of only three performers. As the men attempt to extract a ransom from the woman's wealthy father, their clockwork plan spins off-course. "It was entirely on purpose," said writer-director J Blakeson of the film's terse, oblique simplicity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2010 | By Raja Abdulrahim
In Iranian culture, both guest and host abide by the rules of taroof . Under this cultural creed, guests act as if they have no needs while their hosts try to figure out what their needs are. It's a sort of unspoken test of wills. So when Orange County mental health workers began seeing a rise in Iranian clients, taroof occasionally became a point of contention. Clients or their families would offer tea. If it was declined, coffee was served. Soon, the table was set with food.
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