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ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1988 | DON SHIRLEY
Has Davy Crockett changed between 1955 and 1988? I can't recall Davy eyeing a beautiful young woman (Cheryl Arutt) skinny-dipping in the original 1954-55 shows, as he does in the two-hour "Rainbow in the Thunder," the first of five new "Davy Crockett" episodes that will appear on "The Magical World of Disney" this season (Sunday at 7 p.m., Channels 4, 36 and 39). Still, the new Davy (Tim Dunigan) doesn't forget about his unseen wife and kids.
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NEWS
December 13, 1988 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan met with American Indian representatives Monday and was praised by many participants in the long-awaited session as having made a good start toward improved understanding of problems confronting native Americans. Reagan, who angered many Indians during the Moscow summit meeting last May by saying that Indians had been "humored" in their "primitive life style," called the White House discussion "a meeting between friends."
NEWS
May 13, 1992 | LAURA LAUGHLIN and PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
New federal regulations sharply restricting the use of video gambling machines on Indian lands set off raids Tuesday on five tribal casinos in Arizona, one of them resulting in a five-hour standoff here with Yavapai Indians who blockaded the exit route for FBI trucks. Casino employees and about 100 tribe members at the Ft.
NEWS
October 25, 1997 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It could have been a rematch between President Clinton and Bob Dole, one last chance for the two old rivals to slug it out before the cameras--election or no election. But Dole's dramatic offer to Clinton to join him at the witness table for a day's worth of questioning by the Senate's campaign fund-raising panel probably will be respectfully declined, presidential aides said Friday.
TRAVEL
August 14, 1988 | GENEVIEVE ROWLES, Rowles is a free-lance writer living in Salt Lake City
For one weekend each year a fold in the Wyoming hills swirls with splashes of color and resounds to guttural mountain-men voices, Indian drumbeats, the shouts of children, bows scraping fiddles and musket fire. The rest of the year it's a monochrome of harsh, inhospitable hills. To Jim Bridger, who arrived in 1843 in search of pelts and stayed to set up a trading post, the cottonwoods and aspens tracing the course of the Black Fork of the Green River must have looked mighty good.
NEWS
February 17, 1991 | BARBARA VOBEJDA, THE WASHINGTON POST
Over the last three decades, hundreds of thousands of Americans who used to consider themselves white or black have taken on a new identity: Now they are American Indians. This phenomenon of changing selfhood has baffled and intrigued demographers investigating the forces that have more than tripled the American Indian population since 1960. But in the Indian community, there is little mystery in the heightened desire to proclaim a piece of native lineage.
TRAVEL
October 25, 1987 | ROB MacGREGOR and TRISH JANESHUTZ, MacGregor and Janeshutz are Fort Lauderdale, Fla., free-lance writers.
The entrance was like the hole Alice fell through to Wonderland, just an aperture in the thick foliage, but a portal to another world. We paddled into the labyrinth of Hell's Bay Trail and encountered the mythical Everglades, a watery jungle that exists more in the imagination than in reality.
BOOKS
June 2, 1991 | Jeffrey Scheuer, Scheuer is a New York writer and critic
What on earth does Paul Johnson mean by the Modern and World Society ? The terms seem almost too broad to have meaning. Over the last two centuries, Western society has changed radically in every respect: in technology and commerce, art and intellect, popular government and private morals; through nationalism, colonialism, genocide. Science has journeyed to outer space and inside the atom. To isolate a brief, early period of transition would seem futile and misguided.
NEWS
August 18, 1990 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pearl Bailey, the preacher's daughter who sang and danced her way from Depression coal mining towns to Broadway and the hearts of America as the star of the black "Hello, Dolly!" more than 20 years ago, died Friday in Philadelphia. She was 72. "Pearlie Mae," as she was known to her friends, died at 6:12 p.m. at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, according to the Philadelphia medical examiner's office. The cause of death was not immediately known. Officials said an autopsy will be performed.
NEWS
June 3, 1999 | MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They once were one of this nation's most reclusive Indian tribes, a small band of 400 who lived so deep in the Everglades--among the alligators and the saw grass--that few outsiders ever saw them. But next week, the Miccosukee tribe will host what amounts to a coming out party in its wetland home, and everyone is invited.
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