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Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease

NEWS
December 11, 2000 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If there is a Gallic version of hell, it surely must be this: to watch as food you love is outlawed or deemed dangerous, and to hear that eating it may lead to sickness and death. Last week, Philippe Bardau, the top-rated chef in this former royal capital on the Loire, took all beef-based dishes off the menu of his 19-table restaurant, which boasts a star in the Michelin guide.
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NEWS
December 7, 2000 | Reuters
Germany launched nationwide tests Wednesday for all beef from cattle older than 30 months in its bid to win back consumer confidence shattered by the Europe-wide "mad cow" scare. The government agreed to the move, along with a blanket ban on meat-based animal feed that took effect over the weekend, in anticipation of a package of similar measures that will take effect throughout the European Union beginning Jan. 1.
NEWS
December 5, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The European Union took its most drastic measure yet to stem panic over "mad cow" disease by ordering a six-month ban on almost all animal products in fodder. The ban is expected to cost $1.3 billion, but the ministers hope that it will return confidence in the beef industry. Fodder containing animal products is a key suspect in spreading the disease from Britain four years ago into other areas of Europe.
NEWS
November 27, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
About 3,000 people gathered in Marseilles for a barbecue organized by the city's butchers, who handed out free beef to boost consumer confidence amid growing worries over "mad cow" disease. Public fear about the dangers of eating beef reached panic levels in France this fall when it was discovered that potentially infected meat had made it to supermarket shelves.
NEWS
November 26, 2000 | From Associated Press
German officials agreed Saturday on emergency measures to fight "mad cow" disease, including an immediate ban on the use of meat and bone meal in all animal feed. The quick agreement came after two German-born cows tested positive last week for the disease. The feed ban, promised Friday by Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder, was confirmed by a meeting of state and federal agriculture officials.
NEWS
November 25, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Health and agriculture officials disclosed Friday that selective testing of beef cattle for so-called mad cow disease has turned up two infected animals from Germany, shocking this nation of food purists into action to demand an immediate ban on cattle feed containing animal parts and mandatory testing of older cows before slaughter.
NEWS
November 23, 2000 | From Associated Press
The government reported Spain's first case of "mad cow" disease Wednesday and said it is investigating a second possible case. Tests by government veterinarians in the northwestern Galicia region revealed a confirmed case of mad cow disease, known scientifically as bovine spongiform encephalopathy, late Wednesday morning, Agriculture Minister Miguel Arias Canete said. He said Spanish authorities sent samples of the second animal to British experts for further analysis.
NEWS
November 18, 2000 | From Associated Press
The families of two French victims of a brain-wasting affliction filed a lawsuit Friday accusing French, British and European Union authorities of not acting quickly enough to stamp out "mad cow" disease. The suit, filed with investigating magistrates in Paris' county court, alleges that Laurence Duhamel, who died in February at 36 of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and 19-year-old Arnaud Eboli, who is stricken with the deadly disease, were victims of poisoning and involuntary homicide.
NEWS
November 17, 2000 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With panic rising in France about the likely link between tainted beef and a brain-crippling fatal disease, the government has imposed a series of emergency measures--even banning T-bone steaks. Pushed into acting by what many observers have termed a mass consumer psychosis, Prime Minister Lionel Jospin also ordered a moratorium on the use of animal-based feed for all livestock.
NEWS
November 4, 2000 | From Reuters
Elk and deer hunters in Colorado and Wyoming have been alerted to a fatal brain disease found in the big game similar to mad cow disease, but officials said no evidence exists the disease is transmitted to humans. "It's certainly a cousin of mad cow disease," said Jeff Obrecht, spokesman for the Wyoming Game and Fish Department. That's why hunters, many of whom come from out of state, have been cautioned not to eat the brain or spinal cord of the animals because chronic wasting disease attacks the brain and the nervous system, according to Dr. Richard Hoffman, chief medical officer for the state of Colorado.
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