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April 2, 2006 | Debra J. Miller, Debra J. Miller teaches English at a private high school in Los Angeles.
On Thursday, Oct. 8, 1964, the day the police decided my mother killed my father, I woke up late, the kind of late that snaps you out of your favorite dream, the one where you're wrapped in the arms of your favorite TV hunk--mine was Dr. Kildare--and he's just about to . . . when bang your unconscious tells you the sun is out, the lights are on all over the house and you're going to be late for school because nobody got you out of bed. We were a family of five. I was 14 and the oldest.
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WORLD
April 27, 2014 | By Batsheva Sobelman
At a time when the Middle East peace process appears stymied, Israel received an unexpected olive branch when Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas denounced the Holocaust and expressed sympathy with its victims. “What happened to the Jews in the Holocaust is the most heinous crime known by mankind in modern times,” said Abbas, according to a statement published Sunday by the Palestinian government news agency WAFA . Abbas expressed sympathy for the families who died at the hands of the Nazis and called the world to “safeguard the oppressed and weak wherever they are found.” The Palestinians, “still oppressed and denied freedom and peace,” are the first to stand up for those facing such crimes, he said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2011 | By Robert Faturechi, Los Angeles Times
The process was routine. L.A. County Sheriff's homicide investigator Kevin Lloyd was flipping through snapshots of tattooed gang members. Then one caught his attention. Inked on the pudgy chest of a young Pico Rivera gangster who had been picked up and released on a minor offense was the scene of a 2004 liquor store slaying that had stumped Lloyd for more than four years. Each key detail was right there: the Christmas lights that lined the roof of the liquor store where 23-year-old John Juarez was gunned down, the direction his body fell, the bowed street lamp across the way and the street sign — all under the chilling banner of RIVERA KILLS, a reference to the gang Rivera-13.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2014 | By Sandy Banks
My column Tuesday on the courtroom tears of a gang member sentenced to 40 years in prison for a campus shooting resonated with readers - but not in the way I imagined it would. I considered the courtroom scene a cautionary message to other young men who glorify gangs and are enamored of guns: You could spend the rest of your life in prison over a stupid vendetta and a single violent act. But readers focused not just on the threat posed by hotheads with guns, but on the perceived injustice of such a long sentence for a young man who didn't kill anyone.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1994 | STEVEN HERBERT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although a mistrial has been declared in the Erik Menendez murder case and jury deliberations are continuing in the trial of his brother Lyle, both CBS and Fox are proceeding with projects based on the sensationalized Beverly Hills killings of their parents, Jose and Kitty Menendez. "It is incumbent on us to be very circumspect about what we say and where we put the emphasis," said Zev Braun, producer of a four-hour miniseries for CBS, targeted to air during the May ratings sweeps.
NATIONAL
April 28, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
LAREDO, Texas - This border city is trying to clear its name. It is so conjoined with its Mexican sister city across the Rio Grande, Nuevo Laredo, that the two are often referred to as "Los Dos Laredos," or simply Laredo. That was great for tourism in happier days. But as drug cartel violence exploded in Nuevo Laredo in recent years, pictures broadcast around the world of gunfights, decapitated bodies piled in abandoned minivans, and severed heads dumped in coolers often bore the same headline: "Laredo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2010 | By Joel Rubin, Los Angeles Times
The future of crime fighting begins with a story about strawberry Pop-Tarts, bad weather and Wal-Mart. With a hurricane bearing down on the Florida coast several years ago, the retail giant sent supply trucks into the storm to stock shelves with the frosted pink pastries. The decision to do so had not been made on a whim or a hunch, but by a powerful computer that crunched reams of sales data and found an unusual but undeniable fact: When Mother Nature gets angry, people want to eat a lot more strawberry Pop-Tarts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2000
Street crime down; police crime up. KARL G. LOKSTADT Apple Valley
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2011 | By Sheri Linden
In telling the story of Deborah Peagler, a battered woman who spent 26 years in prison, filmmaker Yoav Potash has not dug up an obscure case of injustice. Thanks in part to his years-in-the-making documentary, the California inmate's struggles were well documented in the news media, and the legal crusade to overturn her first-degree murder conviction received ardent support. "Crime After Crime" brings nothing particularly cinematic to that story — one of horrendous personal abuse, prosecutorial misconduct and seesawing hope and despair.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2012
'Scenes of a Crime' No MPAA rating Running time: 1 hour, 28 minutes Playing: At Laemmle's Music Hall, Beverly Hills
NATIONAL
April 16, 2014 | By Timothy M. Phelps
WASHINGTON - Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. has been crusading for more lenient treatment for nonviolent drug offenders, making it a top priority before he is expected to leave office this year. Recently, however, he has been forced to confront an epidemic of deaths from heroin and prescription drug abuse, one that his opponents have cited as a reason for not loosening drug sentences. In prepared remarks for a speech Wednesday, Holder cited the "stunning rise in heroin and prescription opiate overdose deaths" and vowed the Justice Department was committed to "rigorous enforcement" of the drug laws and "robust treatment" of drug addicts.
NEWS
April 15, 2014 | By Michael McGough
Frazier Glenn Cross (a.k.a. Frazier Glenn Miller Jr.), the 73-year-old extremist accused of killing three people in Overland Park, Kan., is an avowed anti-Semite who reportedly yelled “Heil, Hitler!” while sitting in a police car. Yet his victims were Christians : Dr. William Lewis Corporan and his grandson, Reat Underwood, were Methodists who were at the Jewish Community Center of Greater Kansas City because Reat was going to compete in an “American Idol”-style singing competition.
NATIONAL
April 14, 2014 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Michael Muskal, This post has been updated.
AURORA, Mo. - The killings of three people on the eve of Passover outside two Jewish facilities in a Kansas City suburb are being treated as hate crimes, law enforcement officials said Monday. Overland Park Police Chief John Douglass and others confirmed that the evidence gathered in Sunday's shootings supports a hate crime presentation to a federal grand jury. State charges could also be sought, state and federal prosecutors said at a televised news conference. Meanwhile, as President Obama led a shocked nation in prayer after the deadly shootings, officials searched for clues about the 73-year-old man, believed to be a white supremacist and an anti-Semite, who is in jail in connection with the killings.
NEWS
April 8, 2014 | By Robert Greene
The documentary " Kids for Cash " breezed in and out of Los Angeles so quickly last month that there was little buzz (far too little) about just what the real crime was that the film depicted. That's a shame, because it's such an important story. Fortunately, the film now is set to be screened in the U.S. Capitol Visitor Center in a program hosted by Rep. Tony Cardenas (D-Los Angeles) and Sen. Robert Casey (D-Pa.), and later this month and next at spots around Southern California.
WORLD
April 6, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
PRETORIA, South Africa - Johan Gerber is a shy, neat man with iron-gray hair, a ready smile and a quiet voice. But on the streets, he has taken to carrying an open pocket knife with a mean 4-inch blade, concealed in an envelope and ready to use. Last month, three men accosted him in broad daylight, one of whom hit him in the stomach and grabbed his cellphone. A few years back, eight men surrounded him, held a knife to his throat and stole his wallet. His car and two trailers also have been stolen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2014 | By Joel Rubin and Kate Mather
Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck announced Thursday he is interested in a second term as the city's top cop. In comments to reporters at a monthly media briefing, Beck said he would be "more than proud" to continue as the head of the agency should city officials make the offer. Speaking from a terrace on the top floor of the Police Department's downtown headquarters, Beck said he had conveyed his wishes to Mayor Eric Garcetti and members of the Police Commission, which oversees the LAPD.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - The state Senate on Thursday approved a bill that would reduce the maximum possible misdemeanor sentence from one year to 364 days,  to reduce deportations of legal residents for minor crimes. The bill addresses concern that federal law allows legal immigrants to be deported if they are convicted of a crime and given a one-year sentence. Sen. Ricardo Lara (D-Bell Gardens) said his bill would prevent families from being torn apart if one member commits a crime that is not a felony, such as writing a bad check.
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