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Crime Colombia

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NEWS
September 9, 1988 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
The perennial violence of Colombia has taken some deadly new twists this year. Colombian drug-trafficking gangs, long known for their lethal treatment of outside enemies, now appear to be embroiled in a bloody vendetta among themselves. Colombian leftist guerrillas, at war for decades with the government and its security forces, recently turned heavy fire on rural townspeople.
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TRAVEL
October 2, 2005
IN response to "A Cautionary Note About Cartagena," [Letters, Sept. 18], the presence of armed forces in Cartagena and other Colombian cities has resulted in a drastic decrease in crime. Cartagena is a beautiful place with historic architecture that is without rival in Latin America, and it's also a modern beach resort. Each year hundreds of thousands of Europeans and Canadians visit Colombia. It's time for America to realize that Colombia is much more than what Hollywood movies have depicted and the image that adventurous reporters have created.
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NEWS
December 20, 1998 | From Reuters
National crime-fighters seized more than 59 tons of cocaine and 770 pounds of heroin, worth about $1 billion wholesale in the United States, in record drug hauls in 1998, according to a police report issued Saturday. The National Police's annual crime report also revealed that the Andean nation of about 40 million inhabitants extended its reputation as the kidnap capital of the world, with 2,388 reported abductions this year--a 30% surge from 1997.
NEWS
May 13, 2001 | T. CHRISTIAN MILLER and MAURICIO HOYOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Six years ago, it was the most dangerous road in Colombia. Now, after millions of dollars in repairs, the Highway to the Sea from Colombia's main Pacific port, Buenaventura, to its third-largest city, Cali, is less hazardous--but not by much. Imagine putting the traffic from the Harbor Freeway onto twisting Angeles Crest Highway with one-eyed ambulance drivers behind the wheel. Then throw in the threat of kidnap. That would be a good day.
NEWS
December 31, 2000 | From Reuters
This nation, which has the dubious distinction of being considered the kidnapping capital of the world, beat its own record in 2000 when the tally rose 7%, police said in a report issued Saturday. This year, a total of 3,162 people were kidnapped in Colombia, police said, up from the 2,959 cases reported in 1999. Police said nearly 60% of the kidnappings were the work of leftist rebels.
NEWS
August 8, 1999 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the last two years, U.S. anti-narcotics aid to Colombia has tripled. But even as Washington has dispatched dollars and soldiers to the drug war, Colombian cocaine cultivation has soared 50%. And authorities in Colombia and the U.S. project that it will increase by that much again in the next two years. Colombia--now the world leader in the cultivation of coca, the raw material for cocaine--is producing more potent plants on more acres than ever before, anti-narcotics officials say.
NEWS
March 5, 1987 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
There are some days, while the new dead are being counted, when Colombia can seem a nascent Lebanon. A heritage of violence courses through the fabric of this nation of 28 million that will soon overtake Argentina as the most populous Spanish-speaking country in South America. Violence and Colombia are synonyms. Last year there were more than 11,000 homicides in Colombia. That is about seven times the homicide rate in the United States.
NEWS
May 13, 2001 | T. CHRISTIAN MILLER and MAURICIO HOYOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Six years ago, it was the most dangerous road in Colombia. Now, after millions of dollars in repairs, the Highway to the Sea from Colombia's main Pacific port, Buenaventura, to its third-largest city, Cali, is less hazardous--but not by much. Imagine putting the traffic from the Harbor Freeway onto twisting Angeles Crest Highway with one-eyed ambulance drivers behind the wheel. Then throw in the threat of kidnap. That would be a good day.
NEWS
February 5, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
The brutal slaying of two judges and 10 judicial employees by a rural death squad in January jolted Colombians with the frightening realization that their country has become a land where the law of the gun prevails. Colombian courts are a shambles. Murder, threats, bribery, inefficiency and under-funding have broken down the justice system, virtually giving legal immunity to growing hordes of killers, drug traffickers and other criminals.
NEWS
September 25, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Violence has become so deeply ingrained in Colombia that a national vocabulary has evolved for the many ways in which its people commit mayhem. Those who study the problem even have their own unique job description: violentologists. Like an unwelcome stranger brought aboard an already overcrowded boat, the violence unleashed by drug trafficking in recent years has brought Colombia close to sinking under the weight of its own bloodshed.
NEWS
December 31, 2000 | From Reuters
This nation, which has the dubious distinction of being considered the kidnapping capital of the world, beat its own record in 2000 when the tally rose 7%, police said in a report issued Saturday. This year, a total of 3,162 people were kidnapped in Colombia, police said, up from the 2,959 cases reported in 1999. Police said nearly 60% of the kidnappings were the work of leftist rebels.
NEWS
August 8, 1999 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the last two years, U.S. anti-narcotics aid to Colombia has tripled. But even as Washington has dispatched dollars and soldiers to the drug war, Colombian cocaine cultivation has soared 50%. And authorities in Colombia and the U.S. project that it will increase by that much again in the next two years. Colombia--now the world leader in the cultivation of coca, the raw material for cocaine--is producing more potent plants on more acres than ever before, anti-narcotics officials say.
NEWS
December 20, 1998 | From Reuters
National crime-fighters seized more than 59 tons of cocaine and 770 pounds of heroin, worth about $1 billion wholesale in the United States, in record drug hauls in 1998, according to a police report issued Saturday. The National Police's annual crime report also revealed that the Andean nation of about 40 million inhabitants extended its reputation as the kidnap capital of the world, with 2,388 reported abductions this year--a 30% surge from 1997.
NEWS
February 16, 1996 | STEVEN AMBRUS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While Congress reopens an investigation that could lead to his impeachment, President Ernesto Samper is traveling the nation and handing out huge sums of government money. He is using pork-barrel politics to shore up his support among the poor because the facts condemn him, critics contend.
NEWS
November 10, 1995 | STEVEN AMBRUS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The recording on the newscast shocked even Colombians who thought they were inured to violence after decades of civil war and drug-related murders. "We want $8,000 to deliver [his] head," said the voice of a guerrilla negotiating with a woman for the body of her slain son. "If you want to come up with the money, we'll give you the instructions. If not, we dump him in a hole."
NEWS
August 17, 1995 | From Associated Press
President Ernesto Samper on Wednesday imposed a state of emergency that he said is needed to stem a wave of violent crime. But opposition leaders decried it as an attempt to silence them during Colombia's highest-reaching political scandal. "My constitutional duty to seek peace is as clear and as firm as that of maintaining order," Samper said in a nationally broadcast speech. He said his Cabinet had approved the decree.
NEWS
February 14, 1989
One person is murdered every three hours in Medellin, Colombia's second-largest city, and homicide is the main cause of death among adult males in the country as a whole, according to a U.N. report prepared for the current session of the U.N. Human Rights Commission in Geneva. The 39-page document calls Colombia's record of violence "astounding." There were 3,413 violent deaths with political motives between January and October last year, according to a two-member U.N.
NEWS
June 12, 1995 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every time someone in the United States sniffs cocaine, injects heroin or inhales from a crack pipe, someone here in the global capital of illegal narcotics trafficking gets a bit richer and a bit more powerful. Cali, Colombia's third-largest city, was once best known for hot salsa bands, a dance-loving population and a laid-back manner. But it has become "a sewer of corruption and violence," according to a local businessman who asked not to be named.
NEWS
June 12, 1995 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every time someone in the United States sniffs cocaine, injects heroin or inhales from a crack pipe, someone here in the global capital of illegal narcotics trafficking gets a bit richer and a bit more powerful. Cali, Colombia's third-largest city, was once best known for hot salsa bands, a dance-loving population and a laid-back manner. But it has become "a sewer of corruption and violence," according to a local businessman who asked not to be named.
NEWS
December 16, 1994 | STEVEN AMBRUS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Frustrated by the unrelenting violence that grips Colombia, the government is planning to legalize private security groups in the countryside as a way for rural citizens to protect themselves. But the proposal has outraged human rights experts, who fear the private groups will turn into paramilitary death squads like those that have been responsible for much of the violence.
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