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Crime Fiction

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2013 | By Oliver Gettell
In "The Simple Art of Murder," Raymond Chandler wrote that the world inhabited by good crime fiction "is not a fragrant world, but it is the world you live in, and certain writers with tough minds and a cool spirit of detachment can make very interesting and even amusing patterns out of it. " During a conversation tantalizingly titled "What We Can't Tell You" on Saturday, four such authors pulled back the curtain on how they craft compelling mysteries....
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Paul Giamatti will be playing 1980s-era private detective Hoke Moseley if the pilot he's shooting for FX gets ordered to series. FX announced Wednesday that Giamatti would be starring in the pilot "Hoke," a "darkly comic drama" based on the detective novels of Charles Willeford. The pilot, written and directed by Scott Frank, follows Moseley as he undergoes a midlife crisis and gets involved in a murder investigation. He might also be insane. VIDEO: Summer 2013 TV preview Comparing Willeford to Elmore Leonard, FX president of original programming Eric Schrier said, "Charles Willeford is one of the most deeply respected writers of crime fiction and he created a wholly original and colorful lead character in Detective Hoke Moseley.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2011 | By Denise Hamilton, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Irish crime-fiction wave rises to new heights with Stuart Neville's third novel, the tight, telescopic thriller "Stolen Souls. " The writing here is mature and assured: There are no extraneous words or characters, no discussion of Northern Ireland's long and sorrowful "Troubles. " We are beyond politics, beyond the Celtic Tiger and its financial meltdown, mired in a crumbling 21st century Belfast wasteland where Lithuanian gangs bed down with Ulster Loyalists and Republicans as law enforcement looks the other way. And in this world, there is only a girl on the run. The bad guys chasing her. The worse guy waiting with duct tape and pliers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2013 | Dennis McLellan
Elmore Leonard populated his novels with con men, hustlers and killers, with names like Chili, Stick and Ordell. He plunged readers into a sea of urban sleaze, spiking his tales with mordant humor and moral ambivalence. In stories often set in Detroit or South Florida, he betrayed a love for down-and-out characters and pitch-perfect dialogue. A line from his novel “Be Cool” makes a point in typical Leonard style: “'Chili Palmer's a talker,'” Nick said. “ 'That's what he does, he talks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2000 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Popular French writer Frederic Dard, the author of more than 300 novels including the "San Antonio" detective fiction series, has died. He was 78. Dard died of a heart attack Tuesday at Bonnefontaine in western Switzerland, where he had lived for more than 25 years, authorities in the village said Thursday. Born in 1921 near Grenoble in southeastern France, Dard was the son of a small-business man who went bankrupt in the Depression, losing the family possessions.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2004 | Elaine Dutka
Not many people realize it, but Mickey Spillane is alive -- and writing. "Something's Down There," the 53rd book by the crime fiction legend, was recently published -- more than half a century after his first novel, "I, the Jury," introduced the celebrated private eye Mike Hammer. The 85-year-old writer has since sold more than 180 million books and rubbed shoulders with Hollywood, where his material has been turned into a spate of movies and TV series. Spillane now lives with his third wife in a South Carolina beachfront home, a far cry from his Brooklyn roots.
NEWS
September 6, 1992 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Men, by tradition, write crime fiction out of their own life's work. Dashiell Hammett had been a private eye; Erle Stanley Gardner of Perry Mason fame had practiced law; Joseph Wambaugh has turned his police years into gold. But until recently, women have had to invent murder and mayhem entirely out of their sometimes alarming imaginations. That is changing.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2010 | By Tim Rutten, Los Angeles Times
At some point, many bookish people find themselves struck by the first stanza of Philip Larkin's mordant, post-therapy poem "This Be The Verse": They … you up, your mum and dad. They may not mean to, but they do. They fill you with the faults they had And add some extra, just for you. Now, most readers of a certain maturity get over it and move on to discover Larkin's true masterpieces:...
BOOKS
January 30, 2005 | Tom Nolan, Tom Nolan is the author of "Ross Macdonald: A Biography" and editor of Margaret Millar's "The Couple Next Door: Collected Short Mysteries."
"That strange Marylander" is what Henry Louis Mencken ("the sage of Baltimore") called Samuel Dashiell Hammett, who was born in the Old Line State in 1894, 45 years after Edgar Allan Poe died there. Like Poe, Hammett grew up in an America still fashioning its social and cultural identity from raw materials. And like Poe, inventor of the detective story, Hammett would write tales that held not only the shocks and thrills of entertainment but also the lights and shadows of art.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2013 | By Paula L. Woods
Raymond Chandler is among the undisputed masters of crime fiction, especially for stories set on the mean Southern California streets. His influence on crime fiction helped expand the genre's settings from sunny vicarages to gritty urban centers, set a high standard for using place as character, made the witty observation de rigueur and gave a new twist to the term "gimlet-eyed. " Chandler's detective hero Philip Marlowe was very much a man of his times, and Chandler a faithful chronicler of them, which included slurs against minorities and gays and a not-so-subtle demonization of many female characters.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2013 | By Oliver Gettell
In "The Simple Art of Murder," Raymond Chandler wrote that the world inhabited by good crime fiction "is not a fragrant world, but it is the world you live in, and certain writers with tough minds and a cool spirit of detachment can make very interesting and even amusing patterns out of it. " During a conversation tantalizingly titled "What We Can't Tell You" on Saturday, four such authors pulled back the curtain on how they craft compelling mysteries....
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2013 | By Paula L. Woods
Raymond Chandler is among the undisputed masters of crime fiction, especially for stories set on the mean Southern California streets. His influence on crime fiction helped expand the genre's settings from sunny vicarages to gritty urban centers, set a high standard for using place as character, made the witty observation de rigueur and gave a new twist to the term "gimlet-eyed. " Chandler's detective hero Philip Marlowe was very much a man of his times, and Chandler a faithful chronicler of them, which included slurs against minorities and gays and a not-so-subtle demonization of many female characters.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2013
A look at some recent and recommended books: BIOGRAPHY Photojournalist Tim Hetherington died in 2011 in Libya, two months after attending the Oscars for “Restrepo,” the documentary he made with Sebastian Junger. In “Here I Am: The Story of Tim Hetherington, War Photographer” (Grove Press, $25), the companion to an April HBO documentary, Alan Huffman vividly chronicles the short life of a man drawn to danger zones to capture the horrors of modern warfare. THRILLER Scandinavian crime fiction finds a new voice in Alexander Söderberg, whose dark, intricate debut novel “The Andalucian Friend” (Crown, $26)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2012 | By Paula L. Woods
Kingston Noir Edited by Colin Channer Akashic Books: 285 pp; $15.95 trade paper original Starting in 2004 with "Brooklyn Noir," the more than 50 titles in the Akashic Books series of crime fiction have been distinguished by contributions from writers who live in or write about cities and areas rife with Hollywood-influenced dark sensibilities (Los Angeles, Manhattan, San Francisco) as well as unexpected places (the Twin Cities, Orange County, Delhi) but whose stories teem nonetheless with betrayal, rage and revenge.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2012
* Panel: Crime Fiction: Buried Secrets When: 11 a.m. Sunday Where: Seeley G. Mudd building on the USC campus Who: Denise Hamilton, Gregg Hurwitz, Thomas Perry, Dan Pyne, moderator Tod Goldberg * Panel: Does this book make me look fat? Laughter on the page When: 2:30 p.m. Sunday Where: Davidson Continuing Education Center on the USC campus Who: Merrill Markoe, Dani Klein Modisett, Jill Soloway, moderator Tod Goldberg For more information: http://events.latimes.com/festivalofbooks
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2011 | By Denise Hamilton, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Irish crime-fiction wave rises to new heights with Stuart Neville's third novel, the tight, telescopic thriller "Stolen Souls. " The writing here is mature and assured: There are no extraneous words or characters, no discussion of Northern Ireland's long and sorrowful "Troubles. " We are beyond politics, beyond the Celtic Tiger and its financial meltdown, mired in a crumbling 21st century Belfast wasteland where Lithuanian gangs bed down with Ulster Loyalists and Republicans as law enforcement looks the other way. And in this world, there is only a girl on the run. The bad guys chasing her. The worse guy waiting with duct tape and pliers.
BOOKS
September 3, 1989 | David Williams
"Because of Carey's labors, the reader who has no Japanese can now sample the handiwork of the grand old man of Japanese crime fiction. He has woven the most intricate web of detection, and he (bless him) never leaves a false clue."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2012
Panel: Crime Fiction: Listening In When: April 22, 3:30 p.m. Where: Seeley G. Mudd building on the USC campus Who: Panelists Joseph Kanon, Philip Kerr and Steinhauer; moderated by Paula L. Woods Information: http://events.latimes.com/festivalofbooks/
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2011 | By Sarah Weinman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Today's news stories abound with accounts of men who do unspeakable things to women. Sadly, this is not a new phenomenon, nor will such events go away. But whether it's the sex charges leveled against Wikileaks front man Julian Assange, ABC News' Lara Logan assaulted amidst Egyptian revolution or domestic abuse by the likes of actor Mel Gibson or music stars like Chris Brown, these stories produce an increased undercurrent in victim-blaming and justification ? even as such reactions compete with a greater groundswell of outrage.
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