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Crime United States

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1998 | JOE MOZINGO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Attempting to make sense of a nationwide drop in crime, some of the country's top criminal justice experts who spoke at a Rand Corp. workshop Saturday rejected a common perception that a reported decline in violent crimes was the result of tougher sentencing laws and increased imprisonment.
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NEWS
January 9, 1998 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Drug and alcohol abuse and addiction played a part in the crimes committed by 80% of the 1.7 million men and women now behind bars in the United States, a major national study released Thursday concludes. The study by Columbia University's National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse is the most authoritative assessment yet linking heavy use of drugs and alcohol to crime.
NEWS
December 7, 1997 | From Associated Press
President Clinton described the fatal shootings in a Kentucky school lobby as an "angry wake-up call" and ordered law enforcement and education officials to start work Saturday on an annual report card on school violence. "We know more about the overall patterns of car theft in America than we do about the harm that comes to our children at school," Clinton said in his weekly radio address. "One thing we must do right away is to gain a much clearer view of the problem."
NEWS
November 16, 1997 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Violent crime in America continued its pronounced downward trend in 1996, dropping by 10% from the year before, the Justice Department reported Saturday. Aided by this decline, overall crime victimization--a category covering violent and property offenses--stood at the lowest level since the government began its door-to-door tabulation of lawbreaking in 1973. "All over our country, crime is dropping," President Clinton said in hailing the decreases as part of his Saturday radio address.
NEWS
October 10, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Murders and suicides fell last year among the nation's youth, boosting the average life expectancy of Americans to a high of 76, officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta said. Homicide caused 8.4 deaths per 100,000 people in 1996, down 10.6% from a rate of 9.4 deaths the year before, the CDC said. Among 5- to 14-year-olds, the death rate fell 13.3%. Suicides also dropped. Among 15- to 24-year-olds, the rate fell 9% last year to 12.1 from 13.
NEWS
October 3, 1997 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The juvenile arrest rate for violent crimes dropped a dramatic 9.2% in 1996, marking the second straight year that it declined after rising for seven consecutive years. In announcing the figures Thursday, Atty. Gen. Janet Reno attributed the sharp drop to an emphasis on tougher punishment, better policing in communities and more attention to after-school youth programs. Although arrests for violent youth crimes were down 2.
NEWS
August 25, 1997 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Asserting that domestic violence is "seriously underreported," the Justice Department released a study Sunday that found that a quarter of a million people were treated for injuries inflicted by an intimate partner in 1994--four times more than previously estimated.
NEWS
July 20, 1997 | MARLENE CIMONS and PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton announced Saturday that 10 cities, including Los Angeles, will be added to a computer system that helps authorities pursue illegal gun traffickers by tracing guns sold to juveniles. Clinton said the program, which currently involves 17 cities, including Salinas and Inglewood, has tracked 37,000 guns used in crimes and that many of them were linked to gun-selling rings and dishonest gun dealers.
NEWS
June 29, 1997 | PAUL DEAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As heists go, this was a piece of surgery. Four robbers came armed with .357 Magnums, a pair of walkie-talkies, two vehicles and a simple plan: A two-man operations team would enter the store as the last customer left, minutes before closing. They would obtain details of the alarm system, order the store owner and his clerk to stick their noses into the carpet, duct-tape their wrists, then radio an all-clear to the command team outside. It went like quartz clockwork.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1997 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With crime rates in Los Angeles and other cities plummeting, many analysts say at least part of the reason lies with with demographic trends: The population is aging and the ranks of crime-prone juveniles and young adults have been dropping for more than a decade. "Age is a critical concern," said James Alan Fox, a criminologist at Northeastern University in Boston, who has long argued the connection between age and crime rates.
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