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NEWS
August 17, 1994 | From Associated Press
A commission assembled by Gov. George F. Allen recommended abolishing parole and revamping sentencing Tuesday to keep violent criminals off the streets longer. "Virginians deserve a commitment from their government to incapacitate violent and repeat offenders," said Richard Cullen, a former federal prosecutor and co-chairman of the Commission on Parole Abolition and Sentencing Reform. The plan requires as much as $850 million for new prisons over the next decade, Cullen said.
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NEWS
August 17, 1994 | From Associated Press
A commission assembled by Gov. George F. Allen recommended abolishing parole and revamping sentencing Tuesday to keep violent criminals off the streets longer. "Virginians deserve a commitment from their government to incapacitate violent and repeat offenders," said Richard Cullen, a former federal prosecutor and co-chairman of the Commission on Parole Abolition and Sentencing Reform. The plan requires as much as $850 million for new prisons over the next decade, Cullen said.
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NEWS
July 4, 1993 | PIERRE THOMAS, THE WASHINGTON POST
The bullet exploded from the .40-caliber Glock pistol, wounding a woman in Baltimore in May, 1992. In July, a few blocks away, a man was shot. In the next two months, two more people were wounded by gunfire in neighboring areas. Each time, the gunman escaped. Each time, the shooting seemed isolated. Until recently, there was little chance police would connect such cases, particularly in a city where there were more than 2,914 firearm assaults in 1992.
NEWS
July 4, 1993 | PIERRE THOMAS, THE WASHINGTON POST
The bullet exploded from the .40-caliber Glock pistol, wounding a woman in Baltimore in May, 1992. In July, a few blocks away, a man was shot. In the next two months, two more people were wounded by gunfire in neighboring areas. Each time, the gunman escaped. Each time, the shooting seemed isolated. Until recently, there was little chance police would connect such cases, particularly in a city where there were more than 2,914 firearm assaults in 1992.
NEWS
August 16, 1996 | From Associated Press
A lesbian who lost custody of her son because of her sex life abandoned a three-year battle to get the boy back from her own mother Thursday. But Sharon Bottoms testified that she will instead seek expanded visitation rights, including permission to bring 5-year-old Tyler Doustou to the apartment she shares with her lover. "She just didn't want to go through this ordeal again," explained Donald Butler, Bottoms' attorney.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 2012 | By Cindy Chang, Los Angeles Times
A Chino Hills residence allegedly housing women from China who want to give birth to U.S.-citizen children is on the verge of being shut down by the city after complaints about traffic and a sewage spill. The home is on a hilltop at the end of a long driveway on Woodglen Drive, an area zoned for single family houses. City officials have issued a cease and desist order, alleging that the site is being used as a hotel in a rural residential zone. They plan to take the property owner to court.
NEWS
May 8, 1991 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A California man who helped his terminally ill wife commit suicide with a plastic bag over her head acted out of love, his attorney said Tuesday. But prosecutors say the man, Bertram R. Harper, should be convicted of murder because he did more than assist his wife. "Mrs. Virginia Lee Harper didn't die at her own hands," Wayne County assistant prosecutor Timothy Kenny told jurors Tuesday in his opening statement at Harper's murder trial. "She died at the hands of the defendant."
NATIONAL
December 21, 2006 | From the Washington Post
Virginia authorities have launched a substantial review of the state's DNA database after discovering that thousands of felons may have skirted a legal requirement to submit genetic samples, partly because local and state agencies may have failed to make them do so. Public safety and crime lab officials estimate that at least 20% of felons' DNA profiles could be missing from the database, a flaw that could hamper criminal investigations across the state and nation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1993 | J. NEIL SCHULMAN, J. Neil Schulman is a Los-Angeles novelist and screenwriter.
It's almost funny that, under existing laws, a successful merchant can't be sure of selling anything legally. If you sell a product for less than your competitors, that's "cutthroat competition" or "dumping." If you sell at the same price, it's "price-fixing." And if you sell for more, that's "monopolistic advantage." Those who promote gun-control have stacked the cards even better. If you buy a handgun that is inexpensive, small and low-caliber, it's a Saturday-night special.
NEWS
November 15, 1997 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Virginia jurors, despite expressing fears for their own safety, ruled Friday that Mir Aimal Kasi should die by lethal injection for the murder of a CIA employee near the agency's headquarters almost five years ago. The ruling officially was no more than a recommendation, but Virginia judges usually accept such decisions by their juries. Judge J. Howe Brown Jr., who will announce the sentence Jan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1993
In response to "If Gun Laws Work, Why Are We Afraid?" Column Right, Sept. 20: I begin this letter by pointing out that I am a rock-ribbed conservative Republican. Bill Clinton is a total disaster, California's two senators are sob sisters who never met a social program they didn't like, and this country is in a moral morass. But there is one area where conservatives continually astound me. Namely gun control. Simply put, the best way for America to stem the tide of crime is to completely do away with firearms.
OPINION
September 20, 1998 | Ann Douglas, Ann Douglas, who teaches cultural history at Columbia University, is the author of "Terrible Honesty: Mongrel Manhattan in the 1920s." She is working on a book about Cold War culture
The most profligate periods of public scandal and sensational trials in 20th-century American history have been the 1920s, the 1950s and the 1990s, the three decades that witnessed the birth of a new medium. New media technology multiplies the possibilities of attention, the media's stock in trade; when people invent new tools, they will maximize the situations in which they can best test and display them. The law of media development has always been sibling rivalry.
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