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OPINION
August 7, 2012
Re "7 shot dead at Sikh temple," Aug. 6 The question seems to be if the latest massacre in Wisconsin was a hate crime or an act of domestic terrorism. It was both. Does giving it some kind of label, grouping identification or classification really change the tragic outcome? When some maniac sets out to kill someone, you can't call it anything but hate. It's time to break this epidemic of violence. Yet it continues as we all just watch without trying to stop it. Complacency is the enemy in this war. Frances Terrell Lippman Sherman Oaks The Times' Aug. 6 front page tells it all. Next to this article is the headline hailing the latest Mars landing.
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BUSINESS
March 10, 2014 | By David Lazarus
Valerie saw the recent reports about a fatal crash in Southern California involving a wrong-way driver, and she got to thinking about car insurance. Specifically, if a crime is committed as part of an accident, does your insurer still cover things? ASK LAZ: Smart answers to consumer questions It's a fair question. Auto coverage is predicated on your being a lawful and safe driver -- at least as much as possible. So if you total your car or, God forbid, harm someone while, say, driving drunk or on the wrong side of the road, what are your insurer's obligations?
NEWS
August 8, 2012 | By Leon Legothetis
“I never make stupid mistakes.  Only very, very clever ones.” --John Peel I have skills. Navigating around Siberia is evidently not one of them. Today we drove from the eastern Kazakhstani city of Karaganda to somewhere in Siberia. I say somewhere because I currently have no idea where we are. And this, my friends, is entirely my fault. During our long trip from Britain, Steve has been the designated navigator. There is very good reason for this. He trained to be a scientist (now he is a cameraman)
NEWS
July 23, 2012 | By David Lauter
As the political debate over gun control heats up in the aftermath of the mass killing in Aurora, Colo. , here are three important trends to keep in mind: Criminal violence in America has dropped to levels not seen in more than a generation, the percentage of Americans owning guns is down and public support for gun control measures has plummeted as well. Do fewer Americans own guns now because crime has dropped so much? Or has crime dropped in part because fewer Americans own guns?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
If you watch "Scenes of a Crime" - and you very much should - be prepared to be outraged. A cool documentary that makes the blood boil, it examines how people can be psychologically manipulated into confessing. Not only to crimes they may not have committed but, even worse, to crimes that may never have happened. Hard to sit through but even harder to turn away from, "Scenes" won the grand jury award at the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival. The movie manages, through intense focus on one particular case, to make points that resonate throughout our entire criminal justice system.
WORLD
September 21, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING -- A 16-year-old schoolboy has been arrested under a controversial new Chinese crime of spreading rumors over the Internet. The boy, identified only by his surname, Yang, was detained at his junior high school in northwestern China's Gansu province Tuesday and charged with inciting disputes, as part of a crackdown implemented this month. The teenager's crime involved Internet posts in which he questioned whether police were properly investigating the death of a man who fell from an upper floor of a karaoke club.
NATIONAL
August 25, 2012 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
SALT LAKE CITY - By his own admission, Dave Montgomery was a functioning drunk who hated himself. Not that many years ago he might guzzle 30 Rolling Rocks to mask the memory of a hit-and-run life that included two divorces and a precious daughter who died in childbirth. After he quit boozing, his very existence bored him. Then one night in 2006 the suburban tattoo artist typed into a computer search the words he now says have made all the difference: "real-life superheroes. " Since then, he's joined a world of masked crusaders, morphing from flawed human to a fantastic creation straight out of his imagination.
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