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NATIONAL
April 28, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
LAREDO, Texas - This border city is trying to clear its name. It is so conjoined with its Mexican sister city across the Rio Grande, Nuevo Laredo, that the two are often referred to as "Los Dos Laredos," or simply Laredo. That was great for tourism in happier days. But as drug cartel violence exploded in Nuevo Laredo in recent years, pictures broadcast around the world of gunfights, decapitated bodies piled in abandoned minivans, and severed heads dumped in coolers often bore the same headline: "Laredo.
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NEWS
July 23, 2012 | By David Lauter
As the political debate over gun control heats up in the aftermath of the mass killing in Aurora, Colo. , here are three important trends to keep in mind: Criminal violence in America has dropped to levels not seen in more than a generation, the percentage of Americans owning guns is down and public support for gun control measures has plummeted as well. Do fewer Americans own guns now because crime has dropped so much? Or has crime dropped in part because fewer Americans own guns?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Rather than concentrate on the execution of the crime, this week's DVDs focus on what comes afterward: first the trial, then, for the unlucky, time behind bars. Nominated for seven Academy Awards, including best picture, 1959's “Anatomy of a Murder” is one of the great American courtroom dramas. Directed by Otto Preminger, it features Jimmy Stewart as a small-town lawyer defending Ben Gazzara against a murder charge brought by George C. Scott's hard-driving prosecutor. Archetypes don't get more archetypal than this, with a great Duke Ellington score thrown in for good measure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
Peering into her microscope at a tiny glass shard, Cal State L.A. graduate student Nancy Kedzierski tried to detect subtle shapes, textures and colors that might reveal its origin. Was it from the windshield of a car, a beer bottle, the window of a house? The answer could be crucial if the glass was evidence in a criminal case; it could help establish how and where a murder was committed. The same could be true for all 40 or so hair strands, food particles, pieces of soil, seeds, pills and other materials - some vacuumed from the teacher's carpet for the class project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1999
Re "Davis' Middle Road Is Seen as Logical Course," Sept. 12: Is it only a coincidence that Gov. Gray Davis is as far to the right as his GOP predecessors on crime and punishment and that the California Correctional Police Officers Assn. contributed over $2 million to the Davis campaign in 1998 and that prisoners cannot vote and generally have little means to give political contributions? DOUG KIESO Los Angeles
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