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April 12, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
If you watch "Scenes of a Crime" - and you very much should - be prepared to be outraged. A cool documentary that makes the blood boil, it examines how people can be psychologically manipulated into confessing. Not only to crimes they may not have committed but, even worse, to crimes that may never have happened. Hard to sit through but even harder to turn away from, "Scenes" won the grand jury award at the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival. The movie manages, through intense focus on one particular case, to make points that resonate throughout our entire criminal justice system.
August 25, 2012 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
SALT LAKE CITY - By his own admission, Dave Montgomery was a functioning drunk who hated himself. Not that many years ago he might guzzle 30 Rolling Rocks to mask the memory of a hit-and-run life that included two divorces and a precious daughter who died in childbirth. After he quit boozing, his very existence bored him. Then one night in 2006 the suburban tattoo artist typed into a computer search the words he now says have made all the difference: "real-life superheroes. " Since then, he's joined a world of masked crusaders, morphing from flawed human to a fantastic creation straight out of his imagination.
March 10, 2014 | By David Lazarus
Valerie saw the recent reports about a fatal crash in Southern California involving a wrong-way driver, and she got to thinking about car insurance. Specifically, if a crime is committed as part of an accident, does your insurer still cover things? ASK LAZ: Smart answers to consumer questions It's a fair question. Auto coverage is predicated on your being a lawful and safe driver -- at least as much as possible. So if you total your car or, God forbid, harm someone while, say, driving drunk or on the wrong side of the road, what are your insurer's obligations?
September 16, 1999
Re "Davis' Middle Road Is Seen as Logical Course," Sept. 12: Is it only a coincidence that Gov. Gray Davis is as far to the right as his GOP predecessors on crime and punishment and that the California Correctional Police Officers Assn. contributed over $2 million to the Davis campaign in 1998 and that prisoners cannot vote and generally have little means to give political contributions? DOUG KIESO Los Angeles
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