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NATIONAL
March 12, 2014 | By Jenny Deam
GOLDEN, Colo. - The instructions seemed simple enough: nine steps forward, heel to toe, a quick turnaround, then nine steps back. But for the guy swaying a bit as he walked, his face slack, his eyes half closed, it was all too much. He made the nine steps forward and stopped, forgetting what came next. "Wait. What?" Colorado State Trooper Jason Morales dutifully marked it down in his report, just as he had a few minutes earlier when the suspect closed his eyes and tilted his head back to guess the passage of 30 seconds.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2014 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
In what might be an industry first, movie director Robert Rodriguez ("Desperado," "Machete," "Sin City") has his own TV channel. Born out of a commitment by Comcast, as it acquired an interest in NBCUniversal, to carry minority-owned networks, El Rey (also available via Time Warner and DirecTV) has as its sometime-stated target young English-speaking Latinos. Or rather, young English-speaking Latinos - and anyone else with a television - who likes the sort of movies Rodriguez makes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2014 | By Ben Welsh and Thomas Suh Lauder
Crime reports are up significantly for the latest week in seven L.A. neighborhoods, according to an analysis of LAPD data by the Los Angeles Times' Crime L.A. database . Five neighborhoods reported a significant increase in violent crime. Shadow Hills (A) was the most unusual, recording three reports compared with a weekly average of 0.4 over the last three months. Koreatown (F) topped the list of two neighborhoods with property crime alerts. It recorded 53 property crimes compared with its weekly average of 32.8 over the last three months.
SPORTS
March 10, 2014 | By Houston Mitchell
Minnesota state representative Pat Garofalo has some questions to answer Monday after he sent out a tweet Sunday night that many people took as racist. The tweet:     Let's be honest, 70% of teams in NBA could fold tomorrow + nobody would notice a difference w/ possible exception of increase in streetcrime - Rep. Pat Garofalo (@PatGarofalo) March 9, 2014 Many people on Twitter perceived Garofalo's tweet as a shot at African Americans, since the majority of players in the NBA are black.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2014 | By Hillel Italie
Joe McGinniss, the adventurous and news-making author and reporter who skewered the marketing of Richard Nixon in "The Selling of the President 1968" and tracked his personal journey from sympathizer to scourge of convicted killer Jeffrey MacDonald in the blockbuster "Fatal Vision," died Monday at a hospital in Worcester, Mass. He was 71. McGinniss died from complications of prostate cancer, according to his attorney and longtime friend Dennis Holahan. Few journalists of his time so intrepidly pursued a story, burned so many bridges or more memorably placed themselves in the narrative, whether insisting on the guilt of MacDonald after seemingly befriending him or moving next door to Sarah Palin's house for a most unauthorized biography of the former Alaska governor and Republican vice presidential candidate.
BUSINESS
March 10, 2014 | By David Lazarus
Valerie saw the recent reports about a fatal crash in Southern California involving a wrong-way driver, and she got to thinking about car insurance. Specifically, if a crime is committed as part of an accident, does your insurer still cover things? ASK LAZ: Smart answers to consumer questions It's a fair question. Auto coverage is predicated on your being a lawful and safe driver -- at least as much as possible. So if you total your car or, God forbid, harm someone while, say, driving drunk or on the wrong side of the road, what are your insurer's obligations?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2014 | By Adolfo Flores, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
A 19-year-old charged with fatally shooting his parents and critically injuring his 8-year-old brother while they slept in their San Juan Capistrano home had long planned to “kill the people that loved him the most,” an Orange County prosecutor said Monday. Dressed in a jail-issued orange jumpsuit, Ashton Sachs appeared in court briefly Monday, and told the judge he could not afford to hire an attorney. A public defender was appointed and his arraignment was postponed to April 4. Sachs is accused of entering his family home on Feb. 9 and shooting his parents, Bradford Hans Sachs, 57, and Andra Resa Sachs, 54, and then shooting his 8-year-old brother, who survived but is now paralyzed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2014 | By Abby Sewell and Jack Leonard
The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department is considering a new system for deciding which jail inmates get released early by making predictions about who is most likely to commit new crimes. The proposal calls for a significant shift for the nation's largest jail system, which currently determines when inmates get released by looking at the seriousness of their most recent offense and the percentage of their sentence they have already served. Officials say the current system has weaknesses because it does not take into account the inmate's full record, including serious crimes that occurred years ago. Supporters argue the change would help select inmates for early release who are less likely to commit new crimes.
WORLD
March 7, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - The International Criminal Court on Friday handed down the second conviction in its 12-year history, finding former Congolese warlord Germain Katanga guilty on four counts of war crimes and one count of crimes against humanity. Katanga, a leader of the Patriotic Resistance Force in Ituri, one of the myriad armed militias in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, was found guilty of being an accomplice to murders and pillage during a 2003 attack on the village of Bogoro.
TRAVEL
March 7, 2014 | By Rosemary McClure
GRANADA, Nicaragua - I came to Nicaragua to climb a volcano, to listen to howler monkeys scream in the trees of a rain forest and to walk along a deserted beach, watching the sun flame out at the end of day, turning the sea and sky ablaze. I did all those things and more in this star-crossed Central American nation, a place where culture, history and nature combine to offer visitors some of the hemisphere's most diverse experiences. Nicaragua, which calls itself "the next Costa Rica," has much to commend it: large tracts of nature reserves; sleepy surf towns; dozens of volcanic peaks; rain forests rich with biodiversity; seemingly endless, undeveloped beaches; and charming colonial cities alive with culture.
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