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NATIONAL
January 15, 2012 | By Kim Geiger, Washington Bureau
Texas Gov. Rick Perry, who has been campaigning furiously in South Carolina in an effort to revive his sputtering presidential campaign, said Sunday that the Obama administration had gone "over the top" in criticizing Marines videotaped urinating on Afghan corpses. "Obviously, 18-, 19-year-olds make stupid mistakes all too often, and that's what's occurred here," Perry said in an appearance on CNN's "State of the Union. " He likened the incident to Gen. George S. Patton urinating in the Rhine River and Winston Churchill supposedly doing the same on the Siegfried Line.
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WORLD
August 7, 2013 | By Nicholas Soi and Robyn Dixon
NAIROBI, Kenya - When immigration officer Phillip Ogembo arrived at the Nairobi airport just after 7 a.m. Wednesday, he found his office in the international terminal a wall of orange flames. Ogembo, 34, joined a throng of airport workers watching firefighters struggle without adequate water and equipment to put out an inferno that sent flames and billowing black smoke into the air for hours. The blaze reportedly took hold around dawn in the immigration area of Jomo Kenyatta International Airport, a major regional hub in East Africa for tourists and cargo.
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NEWS
April 5, 1992
One more article finger pointing at Catholics. In your article there are a total of five involved in a criminal act, plus the victim. However, only the religious beliefs of one of the men is mentioned. O. ATWELL Riverside
NATIONAL
July 15, 2013 | Michael Haederle
It began with a casual question that neuroscientist Kent Kiehl posed to a postdoctoral fellow in his laboratory who had been conducting brain scans on New Mexico prison inmates. "I asked, 'Does ACC activity predict the risk of reoffending?' " Kiehl recalls, using the scientific shorthand for the anterior cingulate cortex, a brain structure associated with error processing. The postdoctoral fellow, Eyal Aharoni, decided to find out. When he compared 96 inmates whose brains had been monitored while they performed a test that measures impulsiveness, he discovered a stark contrast: Those with low ACC activity were about twice as likely to commit crimes within four years of being released as those with high ACC activity.
OPINION
May 30, 2011
Egged on by French President Nicolas Sarkozy, the leaders of the Group of 8 nations announced Friday that the Internet was too important for governments to leave ungoverned. Cyberspace needs a legal framework that promotes human rights, the rule of law, privacy, security and the protection of intellectual property, they declared, and they pledged to work on one. Good luck with that. The declaration reflects the wrongheaded wish of many foreign leaders to tame the Net, particularly freewheeling Web-based businesses and online speech.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1986
What Giari may not realize is that the threat of imprisonment, no matter how long or short, is a major deterrent to the commitment of minor crimes. Removal of this threat would remove the cause for many people to think twice before committing a criminal act. The main purpose of imprisonment is not punishment or rehabilitation, but to deter others from becoming criminals. For example, drunk driving is still considered to be a minor crime in this state. A main deterrent to drunk driving is the humiliation of being put behind bars, even if only for a few hours, if you are caught.
NEWS
January 15, 2012 | By Kim Geiger
Texas Gov. Rick Perry, who has been campaigning furiously in South Carolina in an effort to revive his sputtering presidential campaign, said Sunday morning that the Obama administration has gone “over the top” in criticizing Marines who were videotaped urinating on Afghan corpses. “Obviously, 18, 19-year-olds make stupid mistakes all too often,” Perry said in an appearance on CNN's “State of the Union.” “... What's really disturbing to me is just, kind of, the over-the-top-rhetoric from this administration and their disdain for the military.” The Marines have not been charged with any crimes, but the Geneva Conventions forbid desecration of the dead.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2011
UNDERRATED David Chang : Up to now the arc of a celebrity chef peaked at cookbooks and circling the kitchens of the world on basic cable, but the man behind the delicious Momofuku empire in New York is breaking the mold. This month "Lucky Peach" launches, a quarterly food writing journal in partnership with McSweeney's that features recipes, off-kilter essays and fetishistically sharp design consistent with the publisher's track record. Tasty. 'Let Me In' (2010) : Based on box office numbers, horror fans were skeptical about this reworking of the subtly haunting Swedish import "Let the Right One In. " Yet apart from a few moves that ramped up the gore, the American translation retained the original's unsettling core, thanks in part to Chloe Moretz's chilling child vampire and director Matt Reeves' understatedly assured hand.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1987 | PATRICIA KLEIN, Times Staff Writer
In a ruling that both sides agree could cause pornographic film makers to move their operations out of California, a state appellate court Tuesday upheld the pandering conviction of a San Fernando Valley film producer. In a 2-1 ruling, a three-judge panel of the 2nd District Court of Appeal upheld the conviction of Harold Freeman of Encino, the first film maker prosecuted under a 1982 state law aimed at increasing penalties against pimping and pandering.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1987
When the California Legislature enacted an "anti-pimp" law in 1982, it was trying to combat prostitution, not film making. Nonetheless, overzealous state prosecutors in Los Angeles used the law against Harold Freeman, a producer of sexually explicit films, whom they charged with paying actresses to engage in sexual acts before the cameras. By a 2-1 vote an appellate court recently upheld this bizarre use of the law.
NEWS
January 15, 2012 | By Kim Geiger
Texas Gov. Rick Perry, who has been campaigning furiously in South Carolina in an effort to revive his sputtering presidential campaign, said Sunday morning that the Obama administration has gone “over the top” in criticizing Marines who were videotaped urinating on Afghan corpses. “Obviously, 18, 19-year-olds make stupid mistakes all too often,” Perry said in an appearance on CNN's “State of the Union.” “... What's really disturbing to me is just, kind of, the over-the-top-rhetoric from this administration and their disdain for the military.” The Marines have not been charged with any crimes, but the Geneva Conventions forbid desecration of the dead.
NATIONAL
January 15, 2012 | By Kim Geiger, Washington Bureau
Texas Gov. Rick Perry, who has been campaigning furiously in South Carolina in an effort to revive his sputtering presidential campaign, said Sunday that the Obama administration had gone "over the top" in criticizing Marines videotaped urinating on Afghan corpses. "Obviously, 18-, 19-year-olds make stupid mistakes all too often, and that's what's occurred here," Perry said in an appearance on CNN's "State of the Union. " He likened the incident to Gen. George S. Patton urinating in the Rhine River and Winston Churchill supposedly doing the same on the Siegfried Line.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2011
UNDERRATED David Chang : Up to now the arc of a celebrity chef peaked at cookbooks and circling the kitchens of the world on basic cable, but the man behind the delicious Momofuku empire in New York is breaking the mold. This month "Lucky Peach" launches, a quarterly food writing journal in partnership with McSweeney's that features recipes, off-kilter essays and fetishistically sharp design consistent with the publisher's track record. Tasty. 'Let Me In' (2010) : Based on box office numbers, horror fans were skeptical about this reworking of the subtly haunting Swedish import "Let the Right One In. " Yet apart from a few moves that ramped up the gore, the American translation retained the original's unsettling core, thanks in part to Chloe Moretz's chilling child vampire and director Matt Reeves' understatedly assured hand.
OPINION
May 30, 2011
Egged on by French President Nicolas Sarkozy, the leaders of the Group of 8 nations announced Friday that the Internet was too important for governments to leave ungoverned. Cyberspace needs a legal framework that promotes human rights, the rule of law, privacy, security and the protection of intellectual property, they declared, and they pledged to work on one. Good luck with that. The declaration reflects the wrongheaded wish of many foreign leaders to tame the Net, particularly freewheeling Web-based businesses and online speech.
WORLD
May 21, 2011 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
Ai Weiwei, the dissident artist whose arrest has prompted an international outcry, is being charged with evading "huge amounts" of taxes, Chinese state media reported late Friday. The brief dispatch on the New China News Agency was the first official disclosure of the charges being leveled against the 54-year-old artist, who was arrested without warning at Beijing's international airport April 3. The report also said that his company, Beijing Fake Cultural Development Ltd., had "intentionally destroyed accounting records" and committed other criminal acts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2010 | By Richard Winton, Los Angeles Times
The Betty Ford Center has fired an employee who accused actress Lindsay Lohan of assaulting her when she tried to administer an alcohol test, saying the worker violated patient confidentiality by speaking with the media about the incident. But an attorney for technician Dawn Holland said Wednesday that the termination was retaliation for refusing to back off pursuing criminal charges against Lohan. The Dec. 12 incident is being investigated by the Riverside County Sheriff's Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2010 | By Richard Winton, Los Angeles Times
The Betty Ford Center has fired an employee who accused actress Lindsay Lohan of assaulting her when she tried to administer an alcohol test, saying the worker violated patient confidentiality by speaking with the media about the incident. But an attorney for technician Dawn Holland said Wednesday that the termination was retaliation for refusing to back off pursuing criminal charges against Lohan. The Dec. 12 incident is being investigated by the Riverside County Sheriff's Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2000 | DANA PARSONS
He or she is out there somewhere, and you wonder if his or her conscience has spoken. You wonder how life has gone for them since 6 p.m. Jan. 18, when their small Ford pickup ran into a 65-year-old woman out for a walk on a Tuesday night in Laguna Beach, killing her. You wonder how their life has gone, because whoever hit the woman in the crosswalk didn't bother to stop. You wonder if they've given much thought to the life they took.
OPINION
August 30, 2005
Re "Mural or Graffiti? City Draws Line," Aug. 25 Graffiti terrorizes more people than a cross burned by the Ku Klux Klan. It's a way for cowards to feel powerful, frighten the weak and keep the poor from getting out of line. The mural on Joe Escobedo's radiator shop is entirely different. If anything, it's a courageous in-your-face to gangs and taggers, a taking of responsibility for one's community and a strong way to let people know that there's a big difference between making a statement and a threat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2004 | Lance Pugmire, Times Staff Writer
Three male Riverside County Sheriff's deputies have been placed on administrative leave for allegedly engaging in sexual misconduct with female inmates at the county jail in Indio, authorities said Tuesday. Sheriff Bob Doyle said the inappropriate sexual contact was discovered in May when jail authorities reviewed "monitored communications" among inmates, although he declined to say whether those included telephone conversations or inmate letters.
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