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Criminal Behavior

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NEWS
February 18, 2013 | By Monte Morin
Two recent studies linking childhood television viewing to antisocial behavior and criminal acts as adults are prompting some pediatricians to call for a national boob tube intervention. A commentary published alongside the studies in the journal Pediatrics on Monday lamented the fact that most parents have failed to limit their children's television viewing to no more than one or two hours a day -- a recommendation made by the American Academy of Pediatrics. On average, preschool-age children in the United States spend 4.4 hours per day in front of the television, either at home or in daycare.
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OPINION
April 21, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Faced with the threat of a ballot initiative on teacher firings that could have placed it in the awkward position of publicly defending child molesters, the California Teachers Assn. agreed to a compromise: legislation to streamline the appeals process for teachers who are accused of such egregious misconduct. The procedures outlined in the bill strike the right balance of providing teachers with due process to ensure that they have not been fired unfairly, while speeding up the process and making it far simpler and less expensive.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1992 | RAY LOYND
Fans of mystery writer Ross Macdonald may find some fun connecting the dots in the murky "Criminal Behavior" (based on Macdonald's novel "The Ferguson Affair"), but those not acquainted with Macdonald or his book are likely to feel baffled and exhausted (at 9 tonight on ABC, Channel 7, 3, 10 and 42). The production, starring Farrah Fawcett as a tough defense attorney and shot on the streets of Los Angeles, is tacky, hurried and over-plotted.
OPINION
September 5, 2013
Re "'It's modern-day slavery,'" Column, Sept. 1 I am not sure what was more sickening: contemplating 12-year-old sex slaves, or a society that allows the criminal behavior of rape and exploitation to go virtually unpunished, with a small fine and a misdemeanor charge. Who are these so-called human beings who would subject a young girl to the horrors of prostitution? This diminishes all of us. No intent or amount of societal reform makes any sense unless we find a way to stop this most inhumane behavior against children.
NEWS
September 23, 1995 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Do some people carry a "genetic marker" that predisposes them toward crime and violence? Without the fanfare or controversy that surrounded an aborted 1992 conference to debate that question, dozens of scholars gathered here Friday to resume their emotional and academic sparring on one of the most sensitive issues in criminology and social science.
OPINION
April 21, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Faced with the threat of a ballot initiative on teacher firings that could have placed it in the awkward position of publicly defending child molesters, the California Teachers Assn. agreed to a compromise: legislation to streamline the appeals process for teachers who are accused of such egregious misconduct. The procedures outlined in the bill strike the right balance of providing teachers with due process to ensure that they have not been fired unfairly, while speeding up the process and making it far simpler and less expensive.
NEWS
October 2, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
When teenagers engage in dangerous behavior, adults usually chalk it up to some innate fondness for risk - the thrill of an unsafe situation. But in fact, adolescents may be more risk-averse than adults, a new study has found.  Their willingness to engage in risky behavior may have less to do with thrill-seeking per se than with a higher tolerance for uncertain consequences, researchers reported Monday. “Teenagers enter unsafe situations not because they are drawn to dangerous or risky situations, but rather because they aren't informed enough about the odds of the consequences of their actions,” said Agnieszka Tymula, a postdoctoral researcher at New York University and coauthor of a report detailing the study, in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2013 | By Rebecca Keegan
As part of a broader gun control plan he announced last month, President Obama said he will push Congress to fund research into the causes of gun violence - including, potentially, the role of entertainment. Researchers have been tackling the subject of links between violent entertainment and violent behavior for years, often coming to divergent conclusions. Here are a few intriguing findings: In a 2009 study called "Comfortably Numb," psychologists at the University of Michigan, Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam and Iowa State University found that exposure to violent media numbs people to the pain and suffering of others.
NATIONAL
September 18, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
The former leader of the Spokane chapter of the Hells Angels motorcycle gang was sentenced Monday to 7 1/2 years in prison for racketeering. Richard "Smilin' Rick" Fabel, 50, was also ordered by U.S. District Judge Robert Lasnik to pay nearly $55,000 in restitution and stay away from other Hells Angels for at least a year.
OPINION
September 5, 2013
Re "'It's modern-day slavery,'" Column, Sept. 1 I am not sure what was more sickening: contemplating 12-year-old sex slaves, or a society that allows the criminal behavior of rape and exploitation to go virtually unpunished, with a small fine and a misdemeanor charge. Who are these so-called human beings who would subject a young girl to the horrors of prostitution? This diminishes all of us. No intent or amount of societal reform makes any sense unless we find a way to stop this most inhumane behavior against children.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2013 | By E. Scott Reckard, Los Angeles Times
Fannie Mae has fired the executive who headed its Irvine office amid a federal investigation into alleged kickbacks from real estate brokers. One former employee of the home-finance giant has been indicted on charges of soliciting illegal payments from a broker, and another former worker has alleged that such conduct was common at the office. Federal investigators are trying to determine whether the alleged corruption extended to other employees, according to two people with knowledge of the probe.
NEWS
February 18, 2013 | By Monte Morin
Two recent studies linking childhood television viewing to antisocial behavior and criminal acts as adults are prompting some pediatricians to call for a national boob tube intervention. A commentary published alongside the studies in the journal Pediatrics on Monday lamented the fact that most parents have failed to limit their children's television viewing to no more than one or two hours a day -- a recommendation made by the American Academy of Pediatrics. On average, preschool-age children in the United States spend 4.4 hours per day in front of the television, either at home or in daycare.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2013 | By Rebecca Keegan
As part of a broader gun control plan he announced last month, President Obama said he will push Congress to fund research into the causes of gun violence - including, potentially, the role of entertainment. Researchers have been tackling the subject of links between violent entertainment and violent behavior for years, often coming to divergent conclusions. Here are a few intriguing findings: In a 2009 study called "Comfortably Numb," psychologists at the University of Michigan, Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam and Iowa State University found that exposure to violent media numbs people to the pain and suffering of others.
NEWS
November 21, 2012 | By Jon Bardin
People diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder are more likely to commit crimes when they are not receiving medication, according to a study published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine. Numerous studies have shown that ADHD is associated with an increase in criminal behavior, but it has remained unclear how medication use influences this equation after adolescence. The study, which followed 25,656 Swedish people diagnosed with ADHD from 2006 to 2009, is the largest such analysis of the long-term effects of ADHD treatment.
NEWS
October 2, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
When teenagers engage in dangerous behavior, adults usually chalk it up to some innate fondness for risk - the thrill of an unsafe situation. But in fact, adolescents may be more risk-averse than adults, a new study has found.  Their willingness to engage in risky behavior may have less to do with thrill-seeking per se than with a higher tolerance for uncertain consequences, researchers reported Monday. “Teenagers enter unsafe situations not because they are drawn to dangerous or risky situations, but rather because they aren't informed enough about the odds of the consequences of their actions,” said Agnieszka Tymula, a postdoctoral researcher at New York University and coauthor of a report detailing the study, in a statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2012 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
The City Hall park that was used - and some would say abused - byOccupy L.A.protesters last year reopened Thursday after a $1-million rehabilitation. With a smaller lawn and native succulents and salvias, the park will need one-third less water than it did before the demonstration, Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa said, making it a "symbol of sustainability. " The mayor marked the reopening with a ceremony on the south lawn. But not everyone was invited. PHOTOS: City Hall park reopens A dozen Occupy protesters, who had been barred from entering by police, stood unhappily on the other side of a concrete and chain-link fence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1986 | JIM SCHACHTER, Times Staff Writer
Not everyone agrees that more jail beds--or jails alone--are the best investment San Diego County can make in its overburdened criminal justice system. A few skeptics--criminologists, defense lawyers, some judges--say there is evidence that jailing does little to change criminal behavior.
OPINION
February 18, 2010
Taking on heroin Re "A lethal business model targets Middle America," Feb. 14, "Black tar moves in, and death follows," Feb. 15, and "Xalisco's good life can mean death in the U.S.," Feb. 16 Reading your series made me more mad about what the drug pushers have done to our children here in the United States. I'm a father of a former drug addict who has been clean for more than six years. Almost everywhere I go, I hear of people who have had a relative or someone they know involved in drugs.
SPORTS
March 5, 2012 | T.J. Simers
Please, enough with the moral outrage. News flash: NFL players were paid to knock players out of games, as if they weren't going to try to do the same if not paid extra? You hypocrites, every one of you. You love this game because people try to send other people into tomorrow without remembering what happened today. Violence is as critical to the success of the NFL as the ability to bet on games or play fantasy football. Do you really believe a bounty system increases that violence?
OPINION
February 18, 2010
Taking on heroin Re "A lethal business model targets Middle America," Feb. 14, "Black tar moves in, and death follows," Feb. 15, and "Xalisco's good life can mean death in the U.S.," Feb. 16 Reading your series made me more mad about what the drug pushers have done to our children here in the United States. I'm a father of a former drug addict who has been clean for more than six years. Almost everywhere I go, I hear of people who have had a relative or someone they know involved in drugs.
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