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Criminal Code

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WORLD
December 3, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Belarus' lower house of parliament passed legislation that would make it a crime to discredit the state, be a member of the political opposition or advocate human rights in the former Soviet republic. Opposition leaders poured scorn on the proposed amendments to the Criminal Code, saying they were meant to stifle political foes of President Alexander G. Lukashenko. The amendments still require approval from the upper house and must be signed by Lukashenko before they can become law.
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WORLD
March 1, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING -- It was reality television in the extreme. Chinese state television Friday broadcast nearly one hour of live images of the last moments of four foreign drug traffickers about to be executed for the 2011 killing of 13 Chinese fishermen on the Mekong River. Although the cameras pulled away before the final lethal injection, the unprecedented pre-execution coverage unleashed a storm of criticism and debate about the death penalty. Psychologists decried the live coverage as distressing  to children, while lawyers complained that it violated a clause in the criminal code against parading the condemned before execution.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1986 | NICHOLAS DANILOFF, Nicholas Daniloff was the U.S. News & World Report correspondent in the Soviet Union from 1981 until this past fall. He is writing a book about his arrest and imprisonment by the KGB.
The West is right to applaud Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev's decision to allow dissident scientist Andrei D. Sakharov and his wife, Yelena Bonner, to return to Moscow from internal exile. But we should not cheer too lustily yet, for several reasons. First, we should never forget how and why Sakharov was arrested. He was picked up by the KGB as he drove to work in Moscow in January, 1980. He was arrested without warrant and exiled without trial.
NEWS
March 1, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
China executes about 4,000 people a year. On Friday, four of those people got the full reality-TV “Big Brother” treatment. As The Times' Barbara Demick reported : Chinese state television Friday broadcast nearly one hour of live images of the last moments of four foreign drug traffickers about to be executed for the 2011 killing of 13 Chinese fishermen on the Mekong River. Although the cameras pulled away before the final lethal injection, the unprecedented pre-execution coverage unleashed a storm of criticism and debate about the death penalty.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Is This Art, Or What?: An exhibition at the Winnipeg Art Gallery drew complaints from a woman this week because it included nude photographs of men by American artist Lucas Samaras. However, after police looked at the exhibit to determine if it was obscene, they said, "Case closed. The photos don't meet the definition of obscenity under the criminal code. They may be in bad taste, but obscene, no."
WORLD
October 23, 2008 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
A Lebanese mother and her child who fled to Britain to avoid being separated under their country's Islamic law should be allowed to remain, Britain's highest court ruled. The divorced woman, identified only as EM, told immigration officials her allegedly abusive ex-husband would gain custody of their child under Lebanon's Sharia law. Although religious laws are not applied in Lebanon's criminal code, Sharia does apply to Lebanese Muslims on civil issues such as marriage, divorce, child custody and inheritance.
NEWS
July 24, 1988
A proposed revision of the Soviet criminal code will eliminate all but one of the offenses punishable by death, making execution possible only in cases of "premeditated murder in aggravated circumstances," Radio Moscow reported. It said that the revision of the 28-year-old code also replaces, in many cases, imprisonment with fines and other means of punishment. The current code permits the execution of people convicted of treason, murder, flagrant corruption, war crimes and other offenses.
NEWS
November 11, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A member of Kuwait's ruling Sabah family and former minister called on the country's silent majority to rise up and quell the growing Islamist influence in the oil-rich state. In remarks published Saturday, Sheikh Saud al Sabah, oil and information minister in governments from 1992 to 2001, also called for blocking efforts in parliament to amend the criminal code with the strict Islamic sharia law.
NEWS
November 9, 1987 | Associated Press
The justice minister today announced proposals to abolish the use of internal exile as punishment, reduce the number of death penalty offenses and shorten the maximum prison term. Justice Minister Boris V. Kravtsov disclosed the proposed changes during a Tass press agency interview. Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev's campaign for perestroika, or restructuring of Soviet society, has called on the government to appropriately revise the 30-year-old criminal code, Kravtsov said.
NEWS
April 3, 1987 | From Reuters
The Soviet Union is drafting a new criminal code aimed at providing citizens with better protection of their rights, the Communist Party newspaper Pravda said today. Pravda said new legal acts are needed to establish court procedures against officials who abuse the rights of citizens, commenting that this would be a major step toward democratic control over the state apparatus.
OPINION
September 26, 2011
For months now, city officials have been mulling whether to try out an alternative system for enforcing the Los Angeles Municipal Code — the register of offenses that includes nuisances and quality-of-life crimes such as parties that are too loud, and public safety violations such as construction without permits. It takes too long and costs prosecutors too much to go to court on each violation. Can't Los Angeles decriminalize many of these offenses and issue administrative citations much like parking tickets?
WORLD
October 23, 2008 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
A Lebanese mother and her child who fled to Britain to avoid being separated under their country's Islamic law should be allowed to remain, Britain's highest court ruled. The divorced woman, identified only as EM, told immigration officials her allegedly abusive ex-husband would gain custody of their child under Lebanon's Sharia law. Although religious laws are not applied in Lebanon's criminal code, Sharia does apply to Lebanese Muslims on civil issues such as marriage, divorce, child custody and inheritance.
WORLD
December 3, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Belarus' lower house of parliament passed legislation that would make it a crime to discredit the state, be a member of the political opposition or advocate human rights in the former Soviet republic. Opposition leaders poured scorn on the proposed amendments to the Criminal Code, saying they were meant to stifle political foes of President Alexander G. Lukashenko. The amendments still require approval from the upper house and must be signed by Lukashenko before they can become law.
NEWS
November 11, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A member of Kuwait's ruling Sabah family and former minister called on the country's silent majority to rise up and quell the growing Islamist influence in the oil-rich state. In remarks published Saturday, Sheikh Saud al Sabah, oil and information minister in governments from 1992 to 2001, also called for blocking efforts in parliament to amend the criminal code with the strict Islamic sharia law.
NEWS
May 22, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
President Leonid D. Kuchma has signed a new criminal code that formally abolishes Ukraine's death penalty, putting it in line with most European countries. The legislation was approved by parliament last month. Kuchma signed it Friday, and the new code takes effect June 1. The new code sets life imprisonment as the nation's maximum punishment. People under 18 and over 65 and women who were pregnant when they committed a crime or during sentencing are not subject to life terms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1992
"Let there be no mistake," wrote U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, " . . . burning a cross in someone's front yard is reprehensible." We couldn't agree more. Burning a cross in someone's yard also is illegal, a violation of criminal trespassing and vandalism laws. But as utterly repugnant as such behavior is, the Supreme Court was correct Monday in its unanimous decision to strike down a St. Paul, Minn., hate crime ordinance.
WORLD
March 1, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING -- It was reality television in the extreme. Chinese state television Friday broadcast nearly one hour of live images of the last moments of four foreign drug traffickers about to be executed for the 2011 killing of 13 Chinese fishermen on the Mekong River. Although the cameras pulled away before the final lethal injection, the unprecedented pre-execution coverage unleashed a storm of criticism and debate about the death penalty. Psychologists decried the live coverage as distressing  to children, while lawyers complained that it violated a clause in the criminal code against parading the condemned before execution.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Is This Art, Or What?: An exhibition at the Winnipeg Art Gallery drew complaints from a woman this week because it included nude photographs of men by American artist Lucas Samaras. However, after police looked at the exhibit to determine if it was obscene, they said, "Case closed. The photos don't meet the definition of obscenity under the criminal code. They may be in bad taste, but obscene, no."
NEWS
April 12, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet Union, in a major reform of its legal system, put into force Tuesday new legislation that more narrowly defines political crimes, requires fuller proof for conviction and provides for lighter sentences for those found guilty. Soviet legal authorities described the move, part of the broad political liberalization here under President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, as an important step toward allowing greater political pluralism and even as protecting the right of dissent. As an amendment to the country's criminal code, the new legislation replaces a previous statute that outlawed, with little definition, "anti-Soviet agitation and propaganda" and defamation of the Soviet state or political system.
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