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NEWS
October 9, 1991 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
In a finding that raises provocative questions about how a father's drug use might cause birth defects in his children, researchers have found that cocaine can attach itself to human sperm without impairing the sperm's survival or mobility. The results, published today in the Journal of the American Medical Assn., suggest that sperm might carry cocaine or other toxins into an egg, triggering the kind of developmental problems in offspring already seen in animal studies.
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OPINION
April 7, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
California already had what were arguably the nation's toughest sex offender laws in 2006 when voters, spurred on nightly by fear-mongering television hosts such as Nancy Grace and Bill O'Reilly, adopted this state's version of Jessica's Law . Proposition 83 required all convicted sex felons, whether violent or not, whether still on parole or not, and whether at high or low risk of reoffending, to wear electronic monitoring devices for the rest...
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NEWS
March 4, 1992
Jerome Hall, 91, a leading legal scholar and professor emeritus at Hastings College of the Law. Hall, internationally known for his work in criminal law and jurisprudence, wrote seven books and numerous articles on criminal law and legal philosophy. Among his works were "Theft, Law and Society," first published in 1935, and "Readings in Jurisprudence," published in 1938.
NEWS
July 14, 2012 | By Jon Healey
This post has been updated and corrected, as indicated below. The entertainment industry may not adapt swiftly to the technology people use to acquire and enjoy media, but its lawyers certainly do. It took the music industry a matter of weeks to sue Napster, the pioneering online file-sharing site. And since then, each successive iteration of mass-scale infringement has drawn lawsuits, from distributed file-sharing platforms such as Kazaa to newsgroup indexes such as Newzbin to Bit Torrent sites such as the Pirate Bay and to online locker services such as RapidShare . Federal enforcers are not so nimble, but they've been gradually expanding their efforts from direct infringers to enablers.
NEWS
July 26, 1989 | KEITH LOVE, Times Political Writer
Democratic Atty. Gen. John K. Van de Kamp charged Tuesday that criminal statute reforms supported by two of his opponents for governor in 1990 "could lead to the criminalization of abortion" in California. His contention set off a rage among some California district attorneys, but it also put Van de Kamp's opponents on the defensive and opened a debate that will dominate political discussions for months.
NEWS
July 18, 1988 | Reuters
An independent counsel said in an 814-page report released today that Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III probably broke three criminal laws while in office but that prosecution was not warranted. "In certain instances Mr. Meese's conduct probably violated the criminal law, but . . . no prosecution is warranted," said the report by the independent counsel, James C. McKay, detailing various conflict-of-interest charges against the nation's top law enforcement officer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1987 | LARRY GOSTIN, Larry Gostin is the executive director of the American Society of Law and Medicine in Boston.
Fears that out-of-control AIDS patients are seeking vengeance by exposing others to their virus have fueled demands for criminal sanctions. Approximately 30 criminal cases--alleging intentional transmission by biting, spitting, donating infected blood or having sexual intercourse--have been filed across the country against AIDS patients. Florida and Idaho have amended their laws to make it an offense to willfully expose another to the AIDS virus. Fourteen states have similar bills pending.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1999 | FRANKLIN E. ZIMRING, Franklin E. Zimring is a professor of law at UC Berkeley
Behind the debate about the removal of President Clinton, there is a competition between two very different views of the aims of the criminal law. Those who seek stern punishment think of criminal law as a moral talisman that separates the very few who commit crimes from the rest of society. In the rhetoric of the moralist, all crimes and all criminals should be punished or the moral fiber of society will be threatened.
NEWS
December 25, 1992 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In introducing his surprise nominee to be attorney general, President-elect Bill Clinton described Zoe Baird as a "dynamic, talented and innovative lawyer" who is "tough, tenacious and gifted." But then, he is certainly not the first top executive or senior attorney to be impressed with the 40-year-old Baird. Although she is not widely known publicly, she has been acclaimed as a rising star in legal circles and by government insiders.
NEWS
December 16, 1987 | DOUGLAS JEHL and RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writers
Supreme Court nominee Anthony M. Kennedy Tuesday criticized the landmark 1966 decision establishing a "sweeping" rule that protects criminal suspects, saying that the "Miranda" rule does not appear to follow directly "from the words of the Constitution."
OPINION
December 11, 2008
In keeping with Shakespeare's observation that "he that filches from me my good name ... makes me poor indeed," someone suing for libel ordinarily seeks financial compensation from the person or publication that injured his or her reputation. But archaic laws in several states also allow libel to be prosecuted as a criminal offense, and a Colorado man accused of defaming his ex-girlfriend online now faces the possibility of 18 months in prison. The prosecution of J.P.
NATIONAL
August 30, 2007 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
Sen. Larry E. Craig said he had retained a lawyer to examine his case, suggesting that he may attempt to withdraw his guilty plea. That may be possible in some circumstances, legal experts say, but he would risk having more serious charges reinstated and the public exposure of other details of the restroom incident that has imperiled his congressional career. Ordinarily, Minnesota law allows defendants to withdraw plea agreements in limited situations where there has been "manifest injustice."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2007 | Maeve Reston, Times Staff Writer
The overburdened court system in Riverside County will get a special strike team of judges over the next four months to help clear its mounting backlog of cases. California Chief Justice Ronald M. George announced Friday that he planned to use his constitutional authority -- stemming from his duty to "equalize the work of the courts" -- to assign a team of as many as 12 active and retired judges to hear hundreds of backlogged criminal cases in Riverside County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2007 | Maura Dolan, Times Staff Writer
Criminal defense lawyers said Thursday that it was unusual and even "extraordinary" for the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department to have released Paris Hilton to home confinement because of a medical condition. "There are people in custody who have cancer and AIDS and severe heart problems, and they remain in custody," said criminal defense lawyer Darren Kavinoky, whose practice is based in Woodland Hills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2006 | John Balzar, Times Staff Writer
The public defenders at the Norwalk courthouse begin the day with pancakes and strawberries. Attorney Michelle Paffile won a not guilty verdict in a trial, and by tradition she must bring treats for the 14 other public defenders and the staff assigned to this suburban courthouse in southeast Los Angeles County. This was an especially sweet victory for the young attorney, and she's gone all out on this recent Wednesday with mounds of cakes and berries and whipped cream.
NATIONAL
April 13, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Two days after a big immigration march in Phoenix, the Arizona Legislature on Wednesday approved legislation to make illegal immigrants subject to the state's criminal trespassing law. The Senate approved the bill on a 17-12 vote and the House followed with a 33-27 vote, with both Republican-led chambers voting nearly along party lines.
NEWS
July 11, 1990 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state Supreme Court on Tuesday agreed to hear a far-reaching challenge to the constitutionality of Proposition 115, the sweeping criminal justice reform initiative approved by the voters on June 5. In a setback to opponents of the measure, the justices refused to block the continued implementation of the initiative while they determine its legality. The court directed attorneys in the case to file written briefs by Aug. 1, but did not announce when oral arguments will be held.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1995 | ALICIA DI RADO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Newport Beach woman has donated $250,000 to Chapman University, creating the first endowed professorship at the campus's nascent law school, university officials announced Friday. Fritzie Williams made the gift in honor of her husband, Frank L. Williams Jr., former head of the Orange County public defender's office who died in 1981. The gift creates the Frank L. Williams Jr. Professorship in Criminal Law, the second new endowed professor position at Chapman this school year.
OPINION
March 11, 2006 | Samuel W. Buell, SAMUEL W. BUELL is a visiting professor at the University of Texas School of Law.
WHAT IF THE Supreme Court overrules Roe vs. Wade by allowing South Dakota's new abortion statute to pass constitutional review? Abortion, which has been governed in our time by constitutional law, again would be a matter of criminal law. The chief question would be: Who goes to prison?
NATIONAL
November 26, 2005 | Scott Gold, Times Staff Writer
It was telling, one recent morning, that despite the presence of prosecutors, defense attorneys, bailiffs and 27 shackled inmates in orange jumpsuits, New Orleans Magistrate Anthony J. Russo felt compelled to point out: "This is a court." "We are going to have the same decorum," he cautioned. Russo, a 31-year veteran of the bench, is one of a handful of judges presiding over the only form of criminal justice in New Orleans.
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