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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1997 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Emil Matasareanu, the bank robber shot by police in a wild gun battle in North Hollywood and given no medical care, was hit 29 times and bled to death from two bullet wounds to his thigh, the Los Angeles County coroner's office revealed Thursday. His partner, Larry Eugene Phillips Jr.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2014 | By Diana Marcum
No criminal charges will be filed against Kern County sheriff's deputies and California Highway Patrol officers after a 33-year-old man died last year within an hour of being beaten by authorities . Kern County Dist. Atty. Lisa Green said Friday that David Sal Silva's death was not a homicide, and law enforcement used reasonable force in subduing him. Silva's death received national attention because of the number of witnesses who stepped forward claiming police brutality and because officers detained two witnesses until they turned over their cellphones with video recordings.
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NEWS
February 24, 2001 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Of all the acts of executive clemency that President Clinton granted as he was leaving the White House, few strike as close to Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton as her husband's decision to reduce the prison terms of four New York Hasidic Jews convicted of bilking tens of millions of dollars from the government. Sen. Clinton, New York's Democratic junior senator, has said that in general she was a bystander while President Clinton made his decisions on clemency.
OPINION
April 7, 2014 | By Charis E. Kubrin and Erik Nielson
For 16 months, Bay Area rapper Deandre Mitchell - better known as Laz Tha Boy - has been sitting in a jail cell faced with a decision no artist should have to make: whether to defend his innocence at trial, knowing his music likely will be used as evidence against him, or take a plea bargain and admit to crimes he maintains he did not commit. Mitchell's case dates to October 2012, when he was indicted for his alleged role in two gang-related shootings that occurred that year. Prosecutors didn't present a single arrest or conviction to establish Mitchell's association with a criminal gang, and with conflicting eyewitness testimony - and no physical evidence connecting him to the shootings, according to defense attorney John Hamasaki - prosecutors elected to introduce something else: Mitchell's violent gangsta rap videos and lyrics, which were presented to the grand jury as evidence of his criminal behavior.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1993
With banks saying, "Give them the money," and the police saying, "Give them the car," does that mean the criminals have won? PETER W. VASILION Palos Verdes Estates
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1988
Regarding the recent spate of police brutality in San Bernardino and Westminster: I am truly amazed at the outrage and surprise expressed by many community leaders and citizens pertaining to these events. The typically brutal behavior of police is no surprise to me. A respected study originating in Minnesota determined that the behavioral patterns of police and the criminals they are supposed to catch are nearly identical. Intrusion by Orwellicopter, by semi-legal search warrant or by burglary tool are all the same in the end. They expose the same primal bent for domination and brutality by cop and crook alike.
OPINION
March 11, 2011
California reached a milestone late last month when federal immigration officials quietly announced that all 58 counties in the state are now participating in Secure Communities, a controversial program created to track and deport dangerous criminals. Unveiled in late 2008, Secure Communities is billed as a showpiece of immigration enforcement. Under the Immigration and Customs Enforcement program, state and local police must check the immigration status of people who have been arrested and booked into local jails by matching fingerprints against federal databases for criminal convictions and deportation orders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz
A Palo Alto man who searched his name on Google wound up finding out more about himself than he bargained for when he discovered he was a wanted man.  San Leandro police said 27-year-old Christopher Viatafa -- who was wanted by authorities for allegedly firing a gun toward an inhabited dwelling -- turned himself in after seeing the photo. "Although it wasn't good judgment that landed him on the website ... he did use good judgment to turn himself in after seeing his photo," according to a news release from the San Leandro Police Department.
NEWS
October 30, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Under attack from Republicans over its effort to grant citizenship to new immigrants, the Immigration and Naturalization Service denounced as "reckless and divisive" allegations that it is naturalizing criminals and pointed to a record number of expulsions of criminal immigrants in the 1996 fiscal year. In a letter to governors, INS Commissioner Doris M. Meissner said the service "deports criminals, it doesn't naturalize them."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1996
Re "Balancing Rights of Residents, Police in Filing Complaints," Dec. 22. Your editorial comment that "what's certain is that some criminals file false complaints in the hope that it may help their case by casting doubt on the officer's credibility" is probably only certain in the minds of the officers themselves. In fact, most criminals think twice before filing a personnel complaint against an officer and three times before filing a complaint with no basis at all. The first factor stymieing even legitimate complaints by criminals is that by the jailhouse code of honor, many criminals consider filing a personnel complaint against a cop as a form of informing or snitching.
WORLD
April 5, 2014 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY - Mexican federal authorities have detained the interior minister of Michoacan state after determining that he has "possible contacts with criminal organizations," according to a statement released by prosecutors Saturday night. The aggressive action against Interior Minister Jesus Reyna, is a sign that the federal government, which has struggled for months to control the drug-plagued state, is considering the possibility that the influence of narcotics trafficking has spread nearly to the pinnacle of state government.
OPINION
March 27, 2014 | By John Sandweg
President Obama recently directed Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson to examine U.S. immigration enforcement policies to see how the department can "conduct enforcement more humanely within the confines of the law. " The answer to the president's directive is surprisingly simple: Homeland Security's Immigration and Customs Enforcement division, known as ICE, should eliminate "non-criminal re-entrants and immigration fugitives" as a priority...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2014 | By Hector Becerra
Utility giant Pacific Gas & Electric Co. said Thursday it expects federal officials to bring criminal charges against the company in connection with a 2010 gas pipeline blast that devastated a San Bruno neighborhood and killed eight people. PG&E said it was negotiating with the U.S. attorney's office for some type of resolution but provided few details. A spokesperson for the office in San Francisco declined to comment on the investigation or say what if any charges were being considered.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2014 | By Seema Mehta
One of four gubernatorial candidates introduced to California Republicans recently is a registered sex offender who spent more than a decade in state prison, convicted of crimes including voluntary manslaughter and assault with intent to commit rape. Glenn Champ, 48, addressed hundreds of GOP delegates and supporters Sunday at the site of the state party's semi-annual convention. Introduced by party chairman Jim Brulte and allotted 10 minutes, Champ spoke in between the main GOP candidates, former U.S. Treasury official Neel Kashkari and state Assemblyman Tim Donnelly of San Bernardino County.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
"Blood Ties" is a largely engrossing drama set in 1974 that works better as an emotional study of brothers on flip sides of the law than as the Sidney Lumet-type crime saga it strives to be. Still, there's a heft to the proceedings that keeps us invested even when the story's various strands start to unravel. Billy Crudup is superb as Frank, an upright New York cop whose older brother, Chris (Clive Owen), is released from prison after serving a lengthy stint for murder. It's a testy reunion for the mismatched pair as old wounds quickly resurface and Chris' foray into honest work proves short-lived . The upshot: Chris' return to his violent, criminal ways eventually forces Frank to choose between honoring his badge or his family.
WORLD
March 19, 2014 | By Mery Mogollon and Chris Kraul
CARACAS, Venezuela - One month after the arrest of a key opposition leader, Venezuelan government officials have moved to prosecute another: national assembly member Maria Corina Machado. The Venezuelan National Assembly has ordered Atty. Gen. Luisa Ortega Diaz to begin proceedings to strip Machado, a harsh critic of President Nicolas Maduro and National Assembly leader Diosdado Cabello, of her legislative immunity and place her under criminal investigation related to recent antigovernment protests that have left at least 30 dead.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz
A Palo Alto man who searched his name on Google wound up finding out more about himself than he bargained for when he discovered he was a wanted man.  San Leandro police said 27-year-old Christopher Viatafa -- who was wanted by authorities for allegedly firing a gun toward an inhabited dwelling -- turned himself in after seeing the photo. "Although it wasn't good judgment that landed him on the website ... he did use good judgment to turn himself in after seeing his photo," according to a news release from the San Leandro Police Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2014 | By Ruben Vives
The 20-year-old man who was arrested after  allegedly threatening to shoot someone on a Los Angeles street in exchange for 100 retweets now faces charges of making criminal threats. Dakkari Dijon McAnuff, who remains in jail in lieu of $50,000 bail, was arrested Wednesday after Los Angeles police were tipped off to a photo he allegedly posted on Twitter that shows what appears to be a rifle, complete with a scope, pointed down at a city street. The caption on the photo pledges:  “100 [retweets]
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