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REAL ESTATE
November 13, 1994
The story about community efforts to help the disabled buy homes ("On Their Own," Oct. 30) did a good job of illustrating how important feelings of independence and security are to those with disabilities. They are, in fact, the same reasons most people hope to one day own a home. The Crippled Children's Society of Southern California had developed a number of apartment communities throughout the area, representing more than 100 units of housing for low-income adults with physical and or developmental disabilities.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1996
The Crippled Children's Society of Southern California is embarking on a $3.5-million campaign for funds to build a community center for a new housing complex in East Los Angeles. The organization opened Villa Malaga Apartments at 4704 Dozier St. in November. The 24-unit complex is designed for disabled individuals and their families. The second phase of the project involves building a center that will include an indoor therapy pool, a day-care center and classrooms.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1993 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN
An agreement to cede a historical building on city-owned property to the Crippled Children's Society has been extended one year, as the Glendale Housing Authority and the Children's Society wait for federal funding. The Children's Society plans to build a 25-unit apartment complex for disabled adults on the site and restore the 105-year-old Goode House, which would be located in the middle of the project and used as a recreation center.
NEWS
October 24, 1996 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She never had children of her own, but Agnes Plumb still liked to help kids out. Even though she didn't have a job, she would still sit down at the kitchen table of her modest ranch-style home in Studio City and write a $250 check here or a $500 check there for local children's charities. So administrators at the Crippled Children's Society and Orthopaedic Hospital in Los Angeles weren't surprised to learn that the 88-year-old woman, who died a year ago, had remembered them in her will.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1994 | FRANK MANNING
The Joanne and H. E. Baher Center has named one of its employees, Christofer Arroyo, to be the facility's new director, officials from the organization have announced. Arroyo, who has been a program director at the center since July, 1993, will replace Roberta Newton, who left for other career opportunities, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1996 | FRANK MANNING
The Crippled Children's Society of Southern California needs sponsors for participants in the 11th annual Los Angeles Marathon. Twenty entrants, including eight with disabilities, from the Joanne & H.E. Baher Center in Woodland Hills, are scheduled to participate in the marathon on Sunday, officials said. The money raised, they said, will be used for the organization's ongoing programs and services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1996
The Crippled Children's Society of Southern California is embarking on a $3.5-million campaign for funds to build a community center for a new housing complex in East Los Angeles. The organization opened Villa Malaga Apartments at 4704 Dozier St. in November. The 24-unit complex is designed for disabled individuals and their families. The second phase of the project involves building a center that will include an indoor therapy pool, a day-care center and classrooms.
NEWS
October 24, 1996 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She never had children of her own, but Agnes Plumb still liked to help kids out. Even though she didn't have a job, she would still sit down at the kitchen table of her modest ranch-style home in Studio City and write a $250 check here or a $500 check there for local children's charities. So administrators at the Crippled Children's Society and Orthopaedic Hospital in Los Angeles weren't surprised to learn that the 88-year-old woman, who died a year ago, had remembered them in her will.
NEWS
January 15, 1995 | MARY ANNE PEREZ
The Crippled Children's Society of Southern California plans to build a new center and housing complex that will replace the organization's Gage Avenue building. Villa Malaga will include a 24,500-square-foot community center and 24-unit apartment complex for the disabled and their families on two acres at Cesar Chavez and Dangler avenues.
NEWS
August 15, 1985 | THERESA WALKER, Times Staff Writer
Like many single women her age who live on their own, Suzanne Horton-Billard cherishes her independence. With no one but her pet bird, Jonathon, to answer to, the 27-year-old does what she wants when she wants in her one-bedroom apartment on Maple Street in Glendale. An epileptic, Horton-Billard was forced to follow the dictates of rigid schedules and adjust to the behavior of mentally ill roommates at the board-and-care facilities where she lived until a year ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1996 | FRANK MANNING
The Crippled Children's Society of Southern California needs sponsors for participants in the 11th annual Los Angeles Marathon. Twenty entrants, including eight with disabilities, from the Joanne & H.E. Baher Center in Woodland Hills, are scheduled to participate in the marathon on Sunday, officials said. The money raised, they said, will be used for the organization's ongoing programs and services.
NEWS
January 15, 1995 | MARY ANNE PEREZ
The Crippled Children's Society of Southern California plans to build a new center and housing complex that will replace the organization's Gage Avenue building. Villa Malaga will include a 24,500-square-foot community center and 24-unit apartment complex for the disabled and their families on two acres at Cesar Chavez and Dangler avenues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1994 | FRANK MANNING
The Joanne and H. E. Baher Center has named one of its employees, Christofer Arroyo, to be the facility's new director, officials from the organization have announced. Arroyo, who has been a program director at the center since July, 1993, will replace Roberta Newton, who left for other career opportunities, officials said.
REAL ESTATE
November 13, 1994
The story about community efforts to help the disabled buy homes ("On Their Own," Oct. 30) did a good job of illustrating how important feelings of independence and security are to those with disabilities. They are, in fact, the same reasons most people hope to one day own a home. The Crippled Children's Society of Southern California had developed a number of apartment communities throughout the area, representing more than 100 units of housing for low-income adults with physical and or developmental disabilities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1993 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN
An agreement to cede a historical building on city-owned property to the Crippled Children's Society has been extended one year, as the Glendale Housing Authority and the Children's Society wait for federal funding. The Children's Society plans to build a 25-unit apartment complex for disabled adults on the site and restore the 105-year-old Goode House, which would be located in the middle of the project and used as a recreation center.
NEWS
August 15, 1985 | THERESA WALKER, Times Staff Writer
Like many single women her age who live on their own, Suzanne Horton-Billard cherishes her independence. With no one but her pet bird, Jonathon, to answer to, the 27-year-old does what she wants when she wants in her one-bedroom apartment on Maple Street in Glendale. An epileptic, Horton-Billard was forced to follow the dictates of rigid schedules and adjust to the behavior of mentally ill roommates at the board-and-care facilities where she lived until a year ago.
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