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Critical Habitat

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2000 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a victory for environmentalists, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has agreed to designate land--some of which will be in Orange County--as "critical habitat" for two species on the brink of extinction: the Quino checkerspot butterfly and the Riverside fairy shrimp. The Center for Biological Diversity sued the federal agency last year alleging that it failed to protect the habitats of endangered species--a key tenet of the Endangered Species Act.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1992 | JOANNA M. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal wildlife agency on Friday proposed stepping up protection against development on more than 48,000 acres along Southern California rivers and streams considered critical to the survival of a small endangered songbird. To help re-establish the population of the least Bell's vireo, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed "critical habitat" status for 48,020 acres in six counties--Santa Barbara, Ventura, Los Angeles, Riverside, San Bernardino and San Diego.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2004 | Kenneth R. Weiss, Times Staff Writer
The Bush administration on Tuesday proposed dramatically rolling back protections for salmon and steelhead trout streams from Southern California to the Canadian border, saying the rare and endangered fish are sufficiently protected in other ways. The revised plan, which was prompted by a lawsuit from the National Assn.
NEWS
November 24, 2002 | Rita Beamish, Associated Press Writer
In the nation's most sweeping effort to keep species from disappearing forever, the federal government may declare more than one-fifth of Hawaii as "critical habitat" for 255 endangered plants and two bugs. They include such little-known characters as Blackburn's sphinx moth and the Kauai cave wolf spider, as well as the Aupaka violet -- the ultimate in shrinking violets, with only nine plants known to survive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1995 | H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The battle between environmentalists and a transportation agency building a tollway through Laguna Canyon continued Thursday when opponents of the road asked a federal appeals court to continue a construction ban to protect the habitat of an endangered bird. A three-judge panel from the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Pasadena heard oral arguments on an emergency injunction issued by the court Dec.
NATIONAL
June 26, 2007 | Alison Williams, Times Staff Writer
For the first time since coming under federal protection 15 years ago, the northern spotted owls' forest haven may be in jeopardy. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed to decrease the owls' "critical habitat" by 1.5 million acres, or 22%. The birds were listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act in 1990, with the habitat designation coming two years later.
NATIONAL
August 13, 2005 | From Associated Press
Regulators cut back the critical habitat for 19 species of threatened and endangered Pacific salmon and steelhead by about 80% Friday, contending that an earlier designation demanded by environmentalists was poorly executed and that voluntary habitat improvements would work better.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2002 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge in Los Angeles, acceding to a Bush administration request, Monday invalidated protection of several hundred thousand acres of land in Southern California deemed essential to the survival of two imperiled species. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials have said the request is part of a broad reevaluation of "critical habitat" designations involving millions of acres of protected land, mainly in California.
NATIONAL
December 22, 2009 | By David Fleshler
Manatees may rank lower than traditional military menaces like torpedoes or air-to-sea missiles. But a proposal to protect additional habitat for the deceptively gentle, seagrass-munching creatures could, according to the U.S. Navy, end up reducing habitat for destroyers, aircraft carriers and nuclear submarines. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service soon will make a decision on whether to expand what's called critical habitat for the manatee in Florida and southern Georgia, in response to a petition from several environmental groups.
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