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ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2014 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
First, the good news: 166 acts are slated to perform at this year's Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival in Indio. Now the bad: 166 acts are appearing at this year's Coachella. No one can see them all. Here are 10 acts that deserve consideration in planning your weekend viewing. Courtney Barnett To describe this Australian artist's new release, "The Double EP: A Split of Peas," as the product of a "singer and songwriter" is to suggest something less menacing than she is. Barnett's got a great way with lyrics and hooks, packing a lot of information, for example, into "Canned Tomatoes (Whole)
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SPORTS
April 8, 2014 | By Chris Foster
Larry Scott may be the Pac-12 commissioner, but he is concerned about what's going on in the Big 10. Scott weighed in on the Northwestern situation this week with an opinion piece in USA Today. The Northwestern players are attempting to unionize, an effort that gained traction when the National Labor Relations Board in Chicago defined them as “employees.” The ruling affects football players only at a private university. The Wildcats players will vote whether to unionize on April 25 th . Scott said that the NLRB ruling was a “terrible idea” and that it would “destroy” college sports.
REAL ESTATE
April 8, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
More than a year after it approved a report critical of the CIA's interrogation and detention policies, the Senate Intelligence Committee has voted to make a portion of the document public. It's now up to President Obama to ensure that the agency doesn't mount a rear-guard attempt to censor or sanitize the committee's findings in the name of national security. Thanks to news reports and a report by the CIA's inspector general, Americans long have been aware of both the broad outlines and some abhorrent details of the Bush administration's mistreatment of suspected terrorists after 9/11.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Joseph Serna
Officials will host a blood drive Monday in honor of a Los Angeles police officer who was critically injured in a car crash over the weekend while on his motorcycle. The drive will be from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Holy Cross Hospital in Mission Hills. The motorcycle officer - a 26-year veteran whose identity has not been released - was stopped at a traffic light at Lankershim Boulevard and Saticoy Street in North Hollywood about 5:30 p.m. Saturday when he was rear-ended by a suspected drunk driver and pinned between the vehicle and the car in front of him. The officer has undergone several surgeries and has another one planned for Monday, officials said.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2014 | By Kenneth R. Harney
WASHINGTON - When you're raking in tens of billions of dollars in profits by helping credit-elite borrowers buy homes, couldn't you lighten up on fees a little for everyday folks who'd also like to buy? That's a question increasingly being posed to government-controlled home mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac and their federal regulators. Though most buyers are unaware of the practice, Fannie and Freddie - by far the largest sources of mortgage money in the country - continue to charge punitive, recession-era fees that can add thousands of dollars to consumers' financing costs.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2014 | By Ronald D. White
Matthew Vella certainly doesn't look like a troll. Vella is the regular-guy chief executive of Acacia Research Corp., which calls itself a patent outsource licensing company. The Newport Beach firm links up with inventors who fear that others are elbowing in on their patents or whose patents aren't making the money they could. "Our clients often can't afford to hire specialists that will help turn those patents into money," Vella said. "They are not looking to sell them necessarily, but if they are looking to get money because people are infringing their patents, we want to be their partner.
WORLD
April 6, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
MOSCOW - It can take Moscow residents two hours in dense traffic to drive the first 10 miles on the highway to St. Petersburg, in the direction of their country cottages surrounded by lakes and birch groves. Then the road's real limitations become apparent. The potholed two-lane route connecting Russia's two largest cities has never been upgraded into a proper highway. Anyone who cares to drive its entire 440-mile length - mostly truckers - will need at least 12 hours. But 5,600 miles away, the government spent more than $1 billion on less than a mile of bridge connecting Vladivostok with Russky Island, previously inhabited only by a military garrison so isolated that four soldiers starved to death in 1992.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2014 | By Frank Shyong
A motorcycle officer with the LAPD's Valley Traffic Division is in critical condition after a multi-vehicle accident Saturday night, authorities said. The officer was stopped at a traffic light when an SUV ran into him. He was crushed between the SUV and the vehicle in front, Cmdr. Andy Smith said. The circumstances of the collision are under investigation. Two people have been detained at the scene in connection with the incident, Smith said. The officer was taken to a local hospital with severe injuries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2014 | By Frank Shyong
The Los Angeles Police Department officer critically injured in a traffic accident Saturday evening is a 26-year veteran of the force, authorities said. LAPD Cmdr. Andy Smith said the officer, whose name is not being released, has been riding motorcycles for about 20 years.   The motorcycle officer was stopped at a traffic light at the intersection of Lankershim Boulevard and Saticoy Street when a red SUV rammed him from behind and pinned him to the car in front. The incident occurred at around 5:30 p.m. on Saturday, Smith said.  The officer remained in critical condition late Saturday night at a local hospital, where he is undergoing surgery.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Shortly after assuming the helm as the fourth director of the Museum of Contemporary Art last month, Philippe Vergne visited the Los Angeles Times to meet with editors and writers. Still in the beginning stage of absorbing MOCA's history and formulating his mission, he didn't have a great deal to share about his plans. But when asked whether he thought performance, a currently disregarded part of the museum's founding mission, was important, Vergne answered that he wouldn't call it important.
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