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Croatia Elections

NEWS
December 13, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bullet-riddled buildings and abandoned streets and regression to a peasant lifestyle spoke louder than any campaign poster in persuading Ankica Milobratovic that Sunday's election in the disputed Krajina region marked a time for compromise. Like other Serbs tired of suffering for the nationalist goal of being united in one country, the 34-year-old Milobratovic said she so yearns for an end to war and hardship that she can even imagine once again living under Croatian rule.
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NEWS
June 16, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man who until recently was the mayor of this Serb-held city could not find his name on the voter registration list Sunday when he went to cast his ballot for president of Croatia. Nor could hundreds of other Serbs trying to vote in an election that appeared certain to return Croat nationalist leader Franjo Tudjman to the presidency.
NEWS
January 24, 2000 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Voters are hoping to complete Croatia's quiet revolution today with the choice of a new president from three front-runners with one promise in common: Whoever wins must surrender much of his power. The election to replace Franjo Tudjman, who died of cancer Dec. 10, comes three weeks after voters threw his Croatian Democratic Union government out of power in a stunning rejection of old-style nationalism and authoritarian rule.
NEWS
February 19, 2000 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As church bells chimed and an enthusiastic crowd cheered, Croatia's new democratically elected president was sworn in Friday in a brief but emotional ceremony that marked a rare success story in the troubled Balkans. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright joined presidents, prime ministers, diplomats and dignitaries from nearly 50 nations to applaud President Stipe Mesic's inauguration.
NEWS
August 3, 1992 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Croatian President Franjo Tudjman, whose militant nationalism led his country to a declaration of independence from Yugoslavia and a subsequent war with Serbia that has reduced Croatian territory by nearly a third, appeared to be winning another term as president Sunday. The electoral commission reported that with about 6% of the vote counted, Tudjman, with 57%, led his closest rival, Drazen Budisa, by 36 percentage points in the presidential race.
NEWS
April 14, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Widespread irregularities prevented many Serbs from voting in national elections in Croatia on Sunday, in a flunked first test of U.S.-backed plans to lead the last rebel enclave in the Balkan country back to Croatian rule. Voting was so chaotic in Eastern Slavonia, a Serb-held enclave in the eastern corner of Croatia, that U.N. officials first ordered polls to stay open an extra two hours Sunday night and then for nine more hours today.
NEWS
April 7, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Inside an elementary school polka-dotted by artillery fire, Croatian Serb voters took a last stand Sunday against the inevitable: the return of this Serb-held enclave to Croatian rule. "If it's possible, I would like to stay--my home and children and grandchildren are here," said 63-year-old Savo Colovic, who joined other Serbs in approving a largely symbolic referendum calling for, in effect, a degree of political autonomy.
NEWS
August 4, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Serbian military forces have set up concentration camps in Bosnia where non-Serb civilians are systematically tortured and killed, the Bush Administration said Monday, confirming accounts that are hauntingly reminiscent of the atrocities of Nazi Germany. State Department spokesman Richard Boucher said the U.S.
NEWS
May 20, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The battle line in Yugoslavia's on-again, off-again civil war runs straight through this village in eastern Croatia, where ethnic Serbs who have been a minority for centuries have recently come to resent their role.
NEWS
June 13, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Running as an opposition candidate against a popular, authoritarian president has its disadvantages. But Vlado Gotovac, of the opposition Croatian Social-Liberal Party, hardly expected to be beaten up as he stood on stage during a campaign rally last week. The culprit was a member of President Franjo Tudjman's elite guard, who shouted homage to one of Croatia's past fascist leaders as he beat Gotovac, causing a concussion. "Long live Ante Pavelic!"
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