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Croatia Military Confrontations Serbia

NEWS
November 13, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a major step away from war, rebel Serbs in Croatia agreed Sunday to return their breakaway enclave to Croatian government rule, ending an explosive situation that threatened to undermine Balkan peace talks. The agreement announced in the Croatian capital, Zagreb, by U.S. and U.N. mediators ends the Serbs' four-year rebellion and appears to avert, at least for now, a showdown between Serbian separatists and the Croatian army, whose troops have been massing in the area in recent days.
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NEWS
November 12, 1995 | LAURA SILBER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"I constantly dream of Osijek," Dragan Car said Saturday, but the Croatian Serb doubted he will ever return to the hometown he fled four years ago after war engulfed Eastern Slavonia, a patch of land that borders the rump Yugoslavia. And as international envoys struggle to resolve the status of this last bit of Serb-held land in Croatia, Car wondered whether he is destined to become embroiled in fighting once again.
NEWS
November 6, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Backing away from a pledge he made at the Ohio peace talks, Croatian President Franjo Tudjman is threatening to use force to take back the last piece of Serb-held land in Croatia if the dispute over it is not resolved within 25 days. Tudjman also announced that he will not renew the United Nations' mandate in Croatia when it expires at month's end, further raising prospects for war. U.S. and U.N.
NEWS
October 15, 1995 | Reuters
A United Nations general has released a detailed report of Croatian atrocities against Serbs in Croatia's Krajina region and blamed the Croatian government for failing to prevent a "scorched-earth campaign." Brig. Gen. Alain Forand of Canada gave details of murders of elderly civilians, looting and house burning in a departure statement as he ended his mission as head of a U.N. peacekeeping contingent in the area.
NEWS
October 9, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They found Sava Babic's body in the back of her broken-down yellow Fiat, her legs and a walking cane protruding from a rear door. The 82-year-old Serbian woman had been shot in the cheek. She was discovered by the same team of U.N. civilian police officers who had visited her three days earlier and had heard her complaints about Croatian soldiers trying to steal her car. The U.N. officers were bringing food to Babic when they found her.
NEWS
September 22, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Croatian army units were withdrawing from northern Bosnia on Thursday after Bosnian Serbs took to the skies to bomb them, turning back a joint Croatian-Bosnian government offensive that consumed large swaths of Serb-held land, the United Nations said. Progress was reported in negotiations to restore utilities to this besieged capital. But fighting continued to rage in central Bosnia-Herzegovina around the city of Doboj, a hub and gateway to the Serbs' vital east-west supply corridor.
NEWS
August 22, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United Nations protested Monday to the Yugoslav government for its deportation of up to 1,000 military-age men who fled the defeated Krajina region in Croatia but were forced back to Serb-held Bosnia-Herzegovina. The Croatian Serbs, refugees who escaped with their families to the rump Yugoslavia--made up of Serbia and Montenegro--after the Croatian army overran the rebellious Krajina, are stranded in the Bosnian Serb city of Bijeljina.
NEWS
August 20, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Overwhelmed by the arrival this month of more than 150,000 desperate and angry Serbian refugees, Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic resorted to a tried-and-true technique: He ordered television to restrain its coverage of the influx. No pictures of the masses on tractors crossing the border, or of the families languishing in processing centers. Emphasis on the donations of food and clothing.
NEWS
August 19, 1995 | From Associated Press
U.S. diplo mats, hoping that shifting battlefield fortunes will improve chances for peace, shuttled between Serbia and Croatia on Friday to push an initiative that Croatia's president said could produce a deal within weeks. But the main warring sides in Bosnia-Herzegovina--the Muslim-led government and rebel Serbs--adopted a more stubborn attitude a day before the U.S. delegation was expected in Sarajevo, the Bosnian capital. Croatian troops, meanwhile, pressed an assault on rebel Serbs.
NEWS
August 17, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
War flared on new and old fronts in the Balkans on Wednesday while American diplomats shopped around a peace plan that was receiving lukewarm response. The Croatian army, still flush from its stunning victory over Croatian Serbs in the Krajina region, was reported advancing on Bosnian Serbs in western Bosnia-Herzegovina and fortifying positions around the medieval Adriatic town of Dubrovnik.
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