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Croatians Bosnia Herzegovina

NEWS
June 17, 1996 | From Associated Press
Bosnian Croats named a new administration Sunday for their self-styled Bosnian state, defying international attempts to keep Bosnia's Muslims and Croats united. The move comes as nations involved in the NATO-led peace force try to ensure the unity of the Muslim-Croat federation in Bosnia-Herzegovina ahead of elections called for in the peace agreement forged last year in Dayton, Ohio.
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NEWS
April 9, 1996 | From Associated Press
Mass graves uncovered in western Bosnia contain dozens of civilian Serbian victims of Croatian massacres, Serbian forensic experts said Monday. A representative of the international war crimes tribunal at The Hague, international police and European Union monitors were present as Serbs exhumed 181 bodies in two mass graves at the Serbian Orthodox cemetery in the town of Mrkonjic Grad, 75 miles northwest of Sarajevo.
NEWS
March 23, 1996 | From Reuters
The U.N.'s International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia on Friday charged three Bosnian Muslims and a Croat with war crimes, its first indictment for crimes against Serb victims. The tribunal said that three of the four men, two of whom were arrested in Germany and Austria earlier this week, were responsible for running the Celebici camp at Konjic in central Bosnia in 1992.
NEWS
January 2, 1996 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once a model of integration, this town is now so polarized it has two mayors, two police departments, two school systems, even two currencies. Its people, primarily Bosnian Muslims and Croats, are divided into opposing camps and separated by a wasteland of rubble: block after block of bullet-riddled hulks that were once houses, apartments and shops. Now, their war interrupted, the citizens of Gornji Vakuf face a difficult reconciliation.
NEWS
December 31, 1995 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Andelka Hilic, old and sick, was left behind in this ruined town to die. Her fellow Bosnian Serbs--her friends and neighbors--packed up and fled ahead of the advancing Bosnian Croat army three months ago without telling her they were leaving. When the nearly blind, 85-year-old widow went outdoors one day, she found her town deserted. "I'm too lonely, too weak, too old," she said, crying and wiping her eyes with a handkerchief. "They should be ashamed."
NEWS
September 10, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The callers to Radio 99's phone-in program were angry and bewildered Saturday. A 16-year-old girl wept for a sister killed in a war that suddenly seemed lost. Soldiers asked, "What were we fighting for?" An amputee demanded that the government he felt had betrayed him and other victims resign.
NEWS
February 6, 1995 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move aimed at heading off further instability in the Balkans, the United States on Sunday persuaded Bosnia's Croatian and Muslim leaders to rededicate themselves to a shaky federation formed last March.
NEWS
June 24, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Bosnia's Muslims and Croats moved closer by selecting a joint government, but Bosnian Serbs remained doggedly outside efforts to establish peace after 26 months of war. The current head of Bosnia's federal government, Prime Minister Haris Silajdzic, was chosen to also lead the federation government. The assembly also agreed on a Cabinet that includes 14 Muslims, 13 Croats and one Serb. But the federation government lacks one basic prerequisite: territory.
NEWS
February 25, 1994 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration on Thursday summoned Bosnian and Croatian leaders to discuss creation of a joint Muslim-Croatian state covering half of Bosnia-Herzegovina--an idea that U.S. officials consider a key building block for peace in the divided republic. If the talks succeed, the United States would work to promote a formal partition of Bosnia into two federated states, one shared by Muslims and Bosnian Croats and the other dominated by Bosnian Serbs, officials said.
NEWS
February 9, 1994 | DANICA KIRKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The leader of Bosnia's Croats stepped down Tuesday in a move aimed at improving their position in peace negotiations and minimizing criticism of Croatia's efforts to support ethnic kin in Bosnia-Herzegovina. Stung by battlefield losses and the breakdown of an alliance between Bosnian Croats and Muslims, Mate Boban resigned as president of the self-proclaimed republic of Herzeg-Bosna.
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