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Crossword Puzzles

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NEWS
May 10, 1993
Will Weng, 86, who edited the New York Times crossword puzzles from 1968 until 1978. Weng graduated from Indiana State Teachers College in his native Terre Haute, Ind., and got a master's degree from the Columbia University School of Journalism in New York. Weng joined the newspaper as a reporter in 1930, and later worked as a copy editor and chief of the metropolitan news copy desk.
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BUSINESS
December 20, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
What's a 10-letter word for the 100th anniversary of something, in this case crossword puzzles? Google is celebrating the centennial of crossword puzzles Friday with an interactive doodle on its home page. Users can head to Google.com to play the crossword puzzle, which features 78 words across and 70 words down. Newspaper editor Arthur Wynne is credited with publishing the world's first crossword puzzle in the Dec. 21, 1913, edition of the New York World, which called the game a "word-cross puzzle" at the time.
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NEWS
November 1, 1994
Crossword puzzles do it for me. The harder the better. These are tough problems I can solve. Life's day-to-day problems are a lot harder. Unfortunately, I'm usually part of the problem myself. But when I zip through a five-star 21x21 in record time, it gives me the illusion that I can lick 'em all. It feels good to solve a problem that I'm not a part of. Too bad I'm the only one who knows how clever I really am. --LIZ VOGEL South San Gabriel
OPINION
January 14, 2012 | Patt Morrison
If you're lazily inclined to define Diane Keaton by the crossword-puzzle-sized word "actor," you need to get out more. Add to that her work as director and producer, photographer, restorer of venerable houses, board member of the Los Angeles Conservancy and, perhaps above all, as a daughter -- as revealed by her daughter-mother memoir "Then Again. " Little Diane once sat in a neighborhood theater on North Figueroa and watched her mother being crowned Mrs. Highland Park, and wished it were her up on stage instead.
SCIENCE
June 21, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Elderly people who frequently read, do crossword puzzles, practice a musical instrument or play board games cut their risk of Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia by nearly two-thirds compared with people who seldom do such activities, researchers reported in Thursday's New England Journal of Medicine. The study showed that volunteers who did crossword puzzles four days a week had a risk of dementia nearly half that of subjects who did puzzles weekly.
MAGAZINE
December 1, 1985
About the crossword puzzles--I avidly work them and think Tunick and Bursztyn are remarkable. In fact, I send the puzzle to my daughter every week and a thoughtful neighbor gives me hers. I would hate to miss even one. I have found that the new format requires an Eraser-Mate(2), which is an erasable ink pen--I use fine point. That makes it very easy to work on that very shiny paper. Eloise Chapin Arcadia
MAGAZINE
May 23, 1999
I love all of Merl Reagle's crossword puzzles, including "The Short Form" in the May 2 issue. But if Reagle was going to graduate Troy Aikman from any other school than UCLA, I wish he'd chosen the University of Michigan. Ed Greer Hemet Editor's note: Chalk it up to wishful thinking? Or was it Troy's name that led puzzle writer Merl Reagle to mistakenly (and to the horror of UCLA fans) credit cross-town rival USC and its Trojans as the alma mater of the Dallas Cowboys superstar?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1985
To anyone who does crossword puzzles, the name in the headline of the obituary leaped from the page of the newspaper. Ina Claire, the Broadway star of the 1920s who never quite made it in films, had died in San Francisco at age 89 (another source says that she was 92). Though she hadn't been on a stage in years, her name regularly graces the crossword puzzles, so it was startling to find it so out of place in a headline.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1999
Wow! A thousand consecutive L.A. Times Sunday crossword puzzles ("A Grand Occasion," May 30). If my math is accurate, that means that the collaboration of Barry Tunick and Sylvia Bursztyn has gone on for about 20 years. What a remarkable achievement! And how do we learn about it? They tell us by working it into the Puzzler, of course. May the collaboration go on for at least another 20 years. JOHN SCHULTE Banning Tunick and Bursztyn deserve the congratulations and praise of cruciverbalists everywhere, and I sincerely hope they get them.
OPINION
April 18, 1993
In response to "Decision '93," April 11: Profiles of 24 people in the race for mayor. Take another look at their interests--hiking, athletics, scuba diving, growing roses, dogs, crossword puzzles, etc. Gimme a break! Is that all there is to these folks' lives and world? Tens of thousands of people are sleeping in the streets in this City of Angels; in some parts of town nearly half the young are unemployed; murder is now a wholesale business and these clowns are talking about hiking and Greek dancing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2011 | By Claire Noland, Los Angeles Times
Sylvia Bursztyn, who parlayed her playful spirit and love of language into a 30-year career of creating devilishly clever Sunday crossword puzzles for the Los Angeles Times, has died. She was 62. Bursztyn was found dead at her Granada Hills home on Dec. 30. The Los Angeles County coroner ruled her death was from natural causes. Bursztyn collaborated with her puzzle partner Barry Tunick on The Times' word game from April 1980 until his death in 2007, then continued on her own. Their Puzzler first appeared in the Book Review, then moved to the Sunday magazine and finally landed in Sunday Calendar.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2009 | Robert Abele
By the time the majestically unstable and unfunny "All About Steve" gets to a smudged, bleeding Sandra Bullock delivering a teary soliloquy next to a scared deaf girl in a mineshaft, you might assume a film this bonkers would head straight to the center of the Earth next. Or a moon made of cheese. Someplace woefully unreal, in other words. Hollywood movies preaching nonconformity are rarely a winning proposition, and "All About Steve" is no exception: an eat-your-cake-and-have-it-too exercise that razzes oddballs to no end before nearly martyring its off-kilter heroine to guilt-trip the audience.
SPORTS
August 16, 2008 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
Jets spell it out in crosswords for Favre They're bringing Brett Favre up to speed in New York, where the Jets are breaking in their new quarterback as fast as they can. Coach Eric Mangini said they've tried all sorts of approaches to help Favre learn the offense. Some of it is going through videotape, intense conversations and extended walk-throughs, and some of it is . . . crossword puzzles? "He's into crossword puzzles," Mangini said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2007 | Al Martinez
Every morning before rising to face the pain and laughter of another day, Cinelli and I do a crossword puzzle together. We adhere to the theory that if we use our brains in leisure rather then burning them out watching "Jeopardy" we are less likely to lapse into senility for at least another few years.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2007 | Maria Elena Fernandez
Here we are again. Same TV critics. Same networks. Different ballroom. We at the semiannual Television Critics Assn. Press Tour have traded the ritzy Ritz-Carlton Hotel and Spa in Pasadena for the posh 90210 Beverly Hilton. We like this. Sprinkles Cupcakes is within walking distance. Maybe we will run into Paris Hilton. In the meantime, we are at full attention at a PBS session about words, pegged to "Wordplay" and an "Independent Lens" documentary for the fall about crossword puzzles.
NATIONAL
March 25, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Synonym for farewell. Seven letters. "Goodbye." That's the word from the American Crossword Puzzle Tournament, whose organizers have announced it will leave the southern Connecticut city of Stamford for New York after completing its 30th annual contest there this weekend. The move was necessary because the tournament gained widespread interest after the release last year of the documentary "Wordplay," which included footage from the 2005 event.
OPINION
November 3, 2005 | David Levinson Wilk, DAVID LEVINSON WILK writes for "Who Wants to be a Millionaire" and has constructed crosswords for the L.A. Times, the New York Times and USA Today.
THE ANNOUNCEMENT this week that Samuel A. Alito Jr. is taking Harriet E. Miers' place as President Bush's nominee for the Supreme Court should make it clear to everyone that his picks for the high court have nothing to do with the ideological makeup of the Supremes and everything to do with crossword puzzles. I mean, "Alito"? It's a fantastic name for crosswords -- a mere five letters long but brimming with regularly used consonants and vowels (and how generously alternating they are!).
SPORTS
August 16, 2008 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
Jets spell it out in crosswords for Favre They're bringing Brett Favre up to speed in New York, where the Jets are breaking in their new quarterback as fast as they can. Coach Eric Mangini said they've tried all sorts of approaches to help Favre learn the offense. Some of it is going through videotape, intense conversations and extended walk-throughs, and some of it is . . . crossword puzzles? "He's into crossword puzzles," Mangini said.
OPINION
November 3, 2005 | David Levinson Wilk, DAVID LEVINSON WILK writes for "Who Wants to be a Millionaire" and has constructed crosswords for the L.A. Times, the New York Times and USA Today.
THE ANNOUNCEMENT this week that Samuel A. Alito Jr. is taking Harriet E. Miers' place as President Bush's nominee for the Supreme Court should make it clear to everyone that his picks for the high court have nothing to do with the ideological makeup of the Supremes and everything to do with crossword puzzles. I mean, "Alito"? It's a fantastic name for crosswords -- a mere five letters long but brimming with regularly used consonants and vowels (and how generously alternating they are!).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2004 | Paul Pringle, Times Staff Writer
The reading starts when the music stops. Between the jazzy numbers of "Thoroughly Modern Millie," during breaks as brief as two minutes, musicians in the Ahmanson Theatre's orchestra pit holstered their horns, kicked back from their keyboards and began to read. They weren't perusing sharps and flats.
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