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Crowd Control

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1996 | DEBRA CANO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Atop his palomino, Buddy, Police Sgt. Paul Gallagher rode up to the giant blue tarp, a bouquet of colored balloons attached, that was draped over the arena rail. Buddy repeatedly spooked away, terrified by the unfamiliar objects. But by the end of the training session Monday morning, the horse calmed down as he became more familiar with the flapping tarp, balloons and some glowing red road flares.
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NEWS
February 25, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the failures of crowd control in the Los Angeles riots comes the futuristic hope for a bloodless U.N. pullout from Somalia. Sid Heal, a muscle-strapped lieutenant with the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department, watched law enforcement stumble and struggle to contain anarchy in the 1992 civil disturbances. "I was not real happy with the way the riots went," he said. Later, the 44-year-old Heal listened as the U.S.
NEWS
June 2, 2000 | DAN MORAIN and TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Davis administration is trying to insert $4 million into the state budget to help police with crowd control at this summer's Democratic National Convention, despite concerns that only limited taxpayer funds were pledged for the event. The administration wants to route most of the money through the California Highway Patrol, contending that it will help law enforcement keep onramps, freeways and streets open for dignitaries during the mid-August event in downtown Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1991 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a rowdy weekend fraternity dance and post-party shooting on campus, Cal State Northridge administrators are considering tightening restrictions on admission to large-scale social events or banning such functions altogether. CSUN officials were forced to take a second look at new crowd-control procedures used for the first time at Friday night's fraternity dance after campus and Los Angeles police closed it because of unruly crowds outside the entrance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2011 | By Mitchell Landsberg, Joel Rubin and Kate Linthicum Los Angeles Times
When the end came, it came swiftly and with the shock of an overwhelming force. Hundreds of police officers in riot gear swarmed out of Los Angeles City Hall early Wednesday, batons across their chests, surprising and engulfing the Occupy L.A. protesters who had been camped in the surrounding park for two months. "Shame on you!" protesters shouted, as the officers ran to pre-assigned spots, instantly dividing the park into small, easily controlled segments. "Get back!" police shouted to those who came too close.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1992
Police officers have begun two days of mandatory training in tear gas, crowd control and rescue to help better prepare the department for civil disturbances like last spring's riots. The first training session, which wrapped up Thursday, included 120 officers. The department hopes to train all 7,900 officers, said Cmdr. David Gascon. The Police Department and former Chief Daryl F.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 2011 | By Kate Mather, Los Angeles Times
After the death of a 2-month-old boy last month, a new City Council-approved task force is looking at safety issues surrounding the Downtown Los Angeles Art Walk, and changes to the popular monthly event could be made as early as next week. The possibilities include limiting live music and food trucks, or closing streets to traffic during the event, which draws up to 30,000 people on the second Thursday of each month. The task force, approved Wednesday by the City Council, will consist of officials from transportation, public works and law enforcement, and will look for both short- and long-term solutions to growing safety concerns over the event.
SPORTS
July 2, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
City authorities, police officers and English crowd control experts met today to set up security measures to control troublemakers at the World Cup semifinal between West Germany and England. Turin authorities estimated that 40,000 German supporters and 18,000 English fans will come to the city for Wednesday's game between two of Europe's soccer superpowers. Police officers indicated all fans arriving in the northern city will be searched for items that could be used as weapons.
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