Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCrumb
IN THE NEWS

Crumb

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2009 | David L. Ulin, Ulin is book editor of The Times.
The Book of Genesis Illustrated R. Crumb W.W. Norton: 224 pp., $24.95 How do we read R. Crumb's "The Book of Genesis Illustrated"? It seems a contradiction: a sober reconstruction by a man who admits he "[does] not believe that the Bible is 'the word of God.' " And yet, the further we get into this electrifying adaptation, the more it all makes sense. If you remove divinity from the equation, "Genesis" becomes a human creation -- "a powerful text," in Crumb's words, "with layers of meaning that reach deep into our collective consciousness, our historical consciousness, if you will."
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
March 28, 2014
Re "Bring on supply-side economics," Opinion, March 23 To quote Ronald Reagan, "There you go again. " Ideologues like Brad Schiller tout supply-side economics once again as a possible cure for our economic woes. Economists teach us about "supply and demand," but it really should be called "demand and supply," because without demand, supply is irrelevant. Demand is what drives everything, including job creation. If you have a line of customers snaking out the door, you will hire employees to meet that demand, regardless of taxes or regulation.
Advertisement
OPINION
May 21, 2005
Maybe it's just me, but without question The Times has crossed the line of decency with its publishing of the self-portrait cartoon by R. Crumb (Commentary, May 16). The cartoon describes the "Seven Chakras" of Crumb, a depiction of this old man with arrows and labels pointing to his crotch describing the conditions ("anal-obsessiveness, sex obsession, perversion, fetishism, sadomasochism") of his mental state. The once venerable Times appears willing to go to any length to increase its subscriber rate.
SCIENCE
March 28, 2013 | By Monte Morin
Which is smarter: a swarm of brainless mini-robots with clockwork guts, or a colony of ravenous, half-blind Argentine ants? If you answered mindless robots, you're right - but just barely. Researchers studying the problem-solving abilities of foraging ants enlisted the aid of 10 sugar-cube-sized robots to determine whether the real-life insects had to put any thought into deciding which direction they should go when they came to a fork in the road or an obstacle in their path.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2010 | By David Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Here's a phrase you don't often hear in regard to Harvey Pekar: role model. And yet, it seems an apt description of the iconoclastic comics genius, who was found dead early Monday at age 70 in his Cleveland Heights, Ohio, home. Think about it — a longtime VA hospital file clerk with no ability to draw, Pekar essentially reinvented himself, in his 30s, as the creator of "American Splendor," perhaps the greatest of all the underground comics. It is difficult to imagine the subsequent history of the form without its influence.
FOOD
May 6, 1998
Unable to sleep, I arose at 4 a.m. and decided to make the Los Angeles City Schools Old-Fashioned Crumb Cake (Culinary SOS, April 29). As the delicious cinnamon smell began wafting through the house, I was remembering several other LAUSD cafeteria food items that I dearly loved as a kid. I pity the children of today who only have prepackaged and/or fast-food franchises to remember for their school lunches. My favorites were the oatmeal coconut cookies (5 cents each), Spring Garden (a main dish with ground beef, tomatoes and green beans)
MAGAZINE
March 29, 1998
I loved seeing the sign from the old Helms Bakery pictured in the Jan. 25 issue ("Flour Power," by Jim Heimann, So SoCal). In the early 1960s, when I was 4 and 5 years old, I would run out of the house to meet the Helms Bakery truck as it came down our street. It was full of fresh baked goods, and to this day, the best doughnut I ever had was the crumb doughnut from Helms. If anyone ever duplicates it, I'd certainly like to know about it. Pam Lauer Newport Beach
FOOD
July 3, 2002 | CINDY DORN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
DEAR SOS: I have a peach tree with at least 100 peaches on it! Do you have any great peach recipes? ELLEN HUTKIN Tarzana DEAR ELLEN: It's hard to improve upon a ripe peach right off the tree. But here is Joan Ruggles' pie from 1998. Send requests to Culinary SOS, Food Section, Los Angeles Times, 202 W. 1st St., Los Angeles, CA 90012 or e-mail to: cindy.dorn@latimes .com. Please include your last name and city of residence for publication. Summertime Peach Pie With Crumb Top Active Work Time: 30 minutes Total Preparation Time: 1 1/2 hours CRUST 6 tablespoons (3/4 stick)
NEWS
March 1, 1998 | Kenneth Turan
As shocking yet haunting as a Diane Arbus photograph, disturbing because it is so unmistakably human, "Crumb" makes it difficult to look away. Though Terry Zwigoff's 1995 documentary begins as an examination of the art and career of the celebrated cartoonist R. (for Robert) Crumb, it is considerably more than that.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1985
I offer "Yumneys" as the latest catchword of the '80s (young, upwardly mobile, neo-expressionists). P. TIERNEY Torrance
NATIONAL
March 18, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
There's a terrible crime wave sweeping the nation! Well, OK, there's probably not a  crime wave targeting Girl Scout cookies, per se. But when it comes to a few recent cookie-related mishaps, terrible is a pretty good word to describe each of them. Girl Scouts have been selling cookies for almost a century as a fundraiser, which -- with the widespread popularity of the cookies in the 21st century -- means that the girls get to fund the organization and their local troops while the rest of us sit around the office and get fat. Girl Scout cookie sales are thought to reach hundreds of millions of dollars , by some estimates.
NEWS
February 7, 2013 | By Noelle Carter
A touch of fresh-toasted bread crumbs can literally transform a dish, whether sprinkling them over vegetables or gratins, they even work magic drizzled over desserts. And they can elevate a simple pasta dish, too, as Food editor Russ Parsons shows in this amazing (and simple) recipe for spaghetti with arugula and garlic bread crumbs . For more quick-fix dinner ideas, check out our video recipe gallery . Food editor Russ Parsons and Test Kitchen manager Noelle Carter show you how to fix several dishes in an hour or less.
OPINION
November 20, 2012 | By John M. Ackerman
President Obama increased his appeal among Latino voters from 67% to 71% in four years despite the fact that he reneged on his central 2008 campaign promise to "fix our broken immigration system. " This overwhelming support may actually undermine the cause of immigration reform, because it tells the Democrats that the Latino vote is solidly on their side regardless of specific policy stances. This has the dangerous consequence of handing the issue over to the Republicans and their exclusionary, divide-and-conquer approach.
FOOD
December 8, 2011 | By Russ Parsons, Los Angeles Times
Most chef cookbooks fall into one of two categories. They're either faithful replications of what is served at their restaurants or they're what chefs imagine people at home might serve their families (they're not really sure because they rarely cook at home since they're, well, at work). Jean-Georges Vongerichten's "Home Cooking With Jean-Georges" is a notable exception. This is a terrific book, full of exactly the kinds of recipes I want from a master chef. There's no special equipment, no exotic ingredients, no long, elaborate preparations.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2011 | By Kevin Berger, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's unlikely that the lunch crowd in the Haiku Asian Bistro is aware that one of the world's most progressive classical music singers is giving an interview in their chattering midst. But that's how it is with Dawn Upshaw. She blends right in with the suburban moms in this boutique New York suburb, a brief drive from the town where Upshaw lives with her 17-year-old son. Her 21-year-old daughter is away in college. However, it's safe to say that Upshaw, 50, is the only one in the restaurant talking about her love for the contrapuntal music of 81-year-old composer George Crumb.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|