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Cryonics

SPORTS
August 13, 2003 | From Associated Press
Baseball Hall of Famer Ted Williams was decapitated by surgeons at the cryonics company where his body is suspended in liquid nitrogen, and several samples of his DNA are missing, Sports Illustrated reported. The magazine's report, appearing in this week's issue, is based on internal documents, e-mails, photographs and tape recordings supplied by a former employee of Alcor Life Extension Foundation.
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NEWS
January 15, 1988 | LOUIS SAHAGUN and T.W. McGARRY, Times Staff Writers
Investigators believe that an 83-year-old woman was dead when her head was surgically removed at a laboratory run by a group that freezes bodies in hopes of immortality, but they have not ruled out homicide as a cause of death, Riverside County coroner's officials said Thursday. "She was not alive at the time of decapitation," Daniel Cupido, coroner's supervising investigator, said at a press conference. But Cupido said investigators still have questions about her death. "Did she die naturally?
NEWS
May 2, 1990 | From United Press International
A mathematician with a brain tumor has sued the state in hopes of clearing the way to have his head scientifically frozen before he dies, his lawyer said Tuesday. In a case that could expand a person's power to decide how and when they die, Thomas Donaldson, 46, of Sunnyvale, wants his head cryonically suspended in the anticipation that scientists will discover a way to attach it to a healthy body and cure his brain disorder.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1988
The two surviving infants of the world's first triplets born from frozen embryos were reported in good and improving condition nearly a week after their birth. The parents of the triplets, born Jan. 13, were identified for the first time as Sandra Luckman, 35, and her husband, Richard, of Grand Terrace, about 60 miles east of Los Angeles. The children were born 2 1/2 months premature at the California Medical Center in Los Angeles. "One of the boys is named Jonathan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1988
A California woman gave birth in Los Angeles to the world's first triplets born from frozen embryos, it was announced Wednesday. The triplets, a girl and two identical boys, were born 2 1/2 months premature at the California Medical Center's California Reproductive Health Institute. The 35-year-old mother asked to remain anonymous, according to Dr. Richard J. Paulson, director of in-vitro fertilization.
NEWS
January 9, 1988 | LOUIS SAHAGUN and T.W. McGARRY, Times Staff Writers
Investigators looking into the death of a woman whose head was surgically removed and then frozen at a Riverside cryonics center have uncovered numerous zoning violations and what they believe is an illegal drain used to dump fluids from stored bodies into the city's sewer system, officials said Friday.
SPORTS
December 21, 2002 | From Associated Press
Ted Williams' eldest daughter dropped her objections Friday to her siblings' decision to have the Hall of Famer's body frozen at a cryonics lab in Arizona. Bobby-Jo Williams Ferrell relented after Circuit Judge Patricia Thomas agreed to allow a $645,000 trust to be distributed equally among Ferrell, half-brother John-Henry Williams and half-sister Claudia Williams. Ferrell could not afford to continue the legal fight to have her father unfrozen and cremated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1989 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, Times Staff Writer
While Richard C. Jones' body lay suspended in a tank of liquid nitrogen at a warehouse in Riverside on Tuesday, a bitter tug-of-war commenced in Los Angeles Superior Court over the Emmy-winning television producer's deathbed decision to change his will, cutting by half the $10-million legacy he had previously left to a cryonics laboratory. In 1987, Jones, who worked under the name of Dick Clair, set up a will and trust to give his $1-million Toluca Lake estate and residuals from hit televisions shows, including "It's a Living," to the Alcor Life Extension Foundation of Riverside, which freezes bodies in hopes of reviving them at some future date.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1990 | CAROL McGRAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge has given renewed life to a group that freezes the dead in hopes they may be revived someday. Judge Aurelio Munoz ruled Tuesday that it is illegal for the state Department of Health Services to refuse to provide death certificates and body disposition permits for those who want their bodies frozen after death. Until now, those who had chosen to have their bodies frozen after death have been left in legal limbo.
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