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Cryonics

NEWS
March 2, 1994 | ROY RIVENBURG
They have boarded airplanes with a human brain as carry-on luggage, turned a bullet-riddled lawyer into a Popsicle and employed a dog surgeon to operate on people who want to conquer death. Now, after two decades of freezing heads and whole bodies for possible future revival, they have fled California. Alcor Life Extension Foundation, the world's leading cryonics company, has packed up its icy clientele and moved to Arizona.
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NEWS
February 24, 1988 | LOUIS SAHAGUN and MARK ARAX, Times Staff Writers
The Riverside County coroner's office has determined that the death of an 83-year-old woman, whose head was severed and frozen in hopes that future science would reanimate her with a new body, was a "homicide," resulting from a lethal dose of a barbiturate. Calling the death of Dora Kent the "killing of a human being by another," a coroner's official said late Tuesday that the case has been turned over to the district attorney's office for further investigation and possible criminal charges.
SPORTS
July 9, 2002 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Baseball great Ted Williams, a symbol of the game's bygone era, has in the days since his death become the center of an uproar more befitting science fiction. According to one side of his family, the former slugger's corpse has been quietly transported from a Florida funeral home to a cryonics lab in Arizona. They say it's part of a plan by the other side to freeze the remains of the man known as "Teddy Ballgame" with the idea of someday selling his DNA and cloning baseball's next great hitter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1988
A UCLA Medical Center research associate has been placed on leave while university police investigate whether medical equipment seized at a Riverside cryonics laboratory was stolen from UCLA, a spokesman said Wednesday. Jerry Leaf, who keeps an office at the Alcor Life Extension Foundation laboratory in Riverside, was expected to remain on leave with pay for at least 15 days, UCLA spokesman Richard Elbaum said.
SPORTS
August 13, 2003 | From Associated Press
Baseball Hall of Famer Ted Williams was decapitated by surgeons at the cryonics company where his body is suspended in liquid nitrogen, and several samples of his DNA are missing, Sports Illustrated reported. The magazine's report, appearing in this week's issue, is based on internal documents, e-mails, photographs and tape recordings supplied by a former employee of Alcor Life Extension Foundation.
NEWS
January 15, 1988 | LOUIS SAHAGUN and T.W. McGARRY, Times Staff Writers
Investigators believe that an 83-year-old woman was dead when her head was surgically removed at a laboratory run by a group that freezes bodies in hopes of immortality, but they have not ruled out homicide as a cause of death, Riverside County coroner's officials said Thursday. "She was not alive at the time of decapitation," Daniel Cupido, coroner's supervising investigator, said at a press conference. But Cupido said investigators still have questions about her death. "Did she die naturally?
NEWS
May 2, 1990 | From United Press International
A mathematician with a brain tumor has sued the state in hopes of clearing the way to have his head scientifically frozen before he dies, his lawyer said Tuesday. In a case that could expand a person's power to decide how and when they die, Thomas Donaldson, 46, of Sunnyvale, wants his head cryonically suspended in the anticipation that scientists will discover a way to attach it to a healthy body and cure his brain disorder.
NEWS
January 14, 1988 | LOUIS SAHAGUN and T. W. McGARRY, Times Staff Writers
Acting at the request of a group that freezes the dead in the hope that they can be revived in the future, a Superior Court judge Wednesday temporarily barred coroner's investigators from defrosting six heads and a body resting in the group's Riverside headquarters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1988
The two surviving infants of the world's first triplets born from frozen embryos were reported in good and improving condition nearly a week after their birth. The parents of the triplets, born Jan. 13, were identified for the first time as Sandra Luckman, 35, and her husband, Richard, of Grand Terrace, about 60 miles east of Los Angeles. The children were born 2 1/2 months premature at the California Medical Center in Los Angeles. "One of the boys is named Jonathan.
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