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Cryosurgery

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1993 | STEVEN K. WAGNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hsien T. Meng was out of options. Told a year ago that he had terminal liver cancer, he had little choice but to take matters into his own hands. Meng, 75, a resident of Taiwan, had read that doctors at tiny Alhambra Hospital were successfully using an innovative technique to freeze and destroy malignant tumors. Hoping they might be able to help him, he contacted the hospital. But Meng was told that the doctors were performing the procedure only on prostate cancer patients.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
July 19, 2004 | Linda Marsa, Special to The Times
Breast cancer detection has improved dramatically over the years. With mammograms and other imaging techniques, doctors can now spot tumors at their earliest stages. Yet invasive surgery is still necessary for even small cancers. In a few years, that may not be the case. An experimental treatment may be able to eradicate small cancers without surgery, even stimulating the immune system to prevent recurrences.
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BUSINESS
November 22, 1999 | ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Irvine-based Endocare Inc. will announce today that 10 of the nation's leading cancer centers, including two in California, have signed up to offer its groundbreaking treatment for prostate cancer. The announcement signals growing acceptance and accessibility for cryosurgery--a less invasive process that uses extreme cold to kill cancer cells without removing them from the body--to fight prostate disease, Endocare Chief Executive Paul Mikus said.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2000 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Shares of Endocare Inc. posted a double-digit gain for the second day Friday on news that the Irvine company's primary treatment for prostate cancer patients also is effective for patients unsuccessfully treated with radiation. The stock, which hit a low of $2.13 a share exactly a year earlier, reached a 52-week high of $14 during Friday's trading. The stock closed at $12.31, an increase of $1.43--or 13%--over Thursday's close.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2000 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Shares of Endocare Inc. posted a double-digit gain for the second day Friday on news that the Irvine company's primary treatment for prostate cancer patients also is effective for patients unsuccessfully treated with radiation. The stock, which hit a low of $2.13 a share exactly a year earlier, reached a 52-week high of $14 during Friday's trading. The stock closed at $12.31, an increase of $1.43--or 13%--over Thursday's close.
BUSINESS
November 22, 1999 | ROBIN FIELDS
Irvine-based Endocare Inc. will announce today that 10 of the nation's leading cancer centers, including two in California, have signed up to use its groundbreaking treatment for prostate cancer. The announcement signals growing acceptance and accessibility for cryosurgery--a less invasive process that uses extreme cold to kill cancer cells without removing them from the body--to fight prostate disease, said Endocare Chief Executive Paul Mikus.
NEWS
November 21, 1994 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Surgeons at Century City Hospital have for the first time used cryosurgery to treat pancreas tumors, a painful, intractable form of cancer that is almost universally fatal. The innovative technique of killing tumor cells by freezing them to minus 300 degrees Fahrenheit is increasingly used on liver and prostate cancers, but had not been applied to the pancreas because of technical difficulties in the surgery. Dr. Kenneth P.
HEALTH
July 19, 2004 | Linda Marsa, Special to The Times
Breast cancer detection has improved dramatically over the years. With mammograms and other imaging techniques, doctors can now spot tumors at their earliest stages. Yet invasive surgery is still necessary for even small cancers. In a few years, that may not be the case. An experimental treatment may be able to eradicate small cancers without surgery, even stimulating the immune system to prevent recurrences.
NEWS
May 9, 1993
The first ultrasound-guided cryosurgery for prostate cancer in the greater Los Angeles area was successfully performed at Alhambra Hospital last month on a 52-year-old man. The surgery, which involves freezing and destroying prostate cancer cells, was performed by Drs. Douglas and Mahlon Chinn of the Chinn Urology Medical Group of Arcadia and Dr. Wilson Wong of the Arcadia Radiology Medical Group of Arcadia. Cryosurgery is also being used for treatment of liver tumors.
BUSINESS
January 6, 2000
Cryosurgery, which uses extremely cold temperatures to freeze and destroy cancerous cells, was 97% effective on men who had recurrences of prostate cancer, according to the results of a clinical study to be published today in the journal Urology. The study, sponsored by Endocare Inc. in Irvine, found that 42 of the 43 men in the clinical trial have been essentially disease-free since undergoing cryosurgery about two years ago. Cryosurgery has been used to treat first-time cancer patients.
BUSINESS
January 6, 2000
Cryosurgery, which uses extremely cold temperatures to freeze and destroy cancerous cells, was 97% effective on men who had recurrences of prostate cancer, according to the results of a clinical study to be published today in the journal Urology. The study, sponsored by Endocare Inc. in Irvine, found that 42 of the 43 men in the clinical trial have been essentially disease-free since undergoing cryosurgery about two years ago. Cryosurgery has been used to treat first-time cancer patients.
BUSINESS
November 22, 1999 | ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Irvine-based Endocare Inc. will announce today that 10 of the nation's leading cancer centers, including two in California, have signed up to offer its groundbreaking treatment for prostate cancer. The announcement signals growing acceptance and accessibility for cryosurgery--a less invasive process that uses extreme cold to kill cancer cells without removing them from the body--to fight prostate disease, Endocare Chief Executive Paul Mikus said.
BUSINESS
November 22, 1999 | ROBIN FIELDS
Irvine-based Endocare Inc. will announce today that 10 of the nation's leading cancer centers, including two in California, have signed up to use its groundbreaking treatment for prostate cancer. The announcement signals growing acceptance and accessibility for cryosurgery--a less invasive process that uses extreme cold to kill cancer cells without removing them from the body--to fight prostate disease, said Endocare Chief Executive Paul Mikus.
NEWS
November 21, 1994 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Surgeons at Century City Hospital have for the first time used cryosurgery to treat pancreas tumors, a painful, intractable form of cancer that is almost universally fatal. The innovative technique of killing tumor cells by freezing them to minus 300 degrees Fahrenheit is increasingly used on liver and prostate cancers, but had not been applied to the pancreas because of technical difficulties in the surgery. Dr. Kenneth P.
NEWS
December 30, 1993 | STEVEN K. WAGNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hsien T. Meng was out of options. Told a year ago that he had terminal liver cancer, he had little choice but to take matters into his own hands. Meng, 75, a resident of Taiwan, had read that doctors at tiny Alhambra Hospital were successfully using an innovative technique to freeze and destroy malignant tumors. Hoping they might be able to help him, he contacted the hospital. But Meng was told that the doctors were performing the procedure only on prostate cancer patients.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1993 | STEVEN K. WAGNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hsien T. Meng was out of options. Told a year ago that he had terminal liver cancer, he had little choice but to take matters into his own hands. Meng, 75, a resident of Taiwan, had read that doctors at tiny Alhambra Hospital were successfully using an innovative technique to freeze and destroy malignant tumors. Hoping they might be able to help him, he contacted the hospital. But Meng was told that the doctors were performing the procedure only on prostate cancer patients.
NEWS
December 30, 1993 | STEVEN K. WAGNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hsien T. Meng was out of options. Told a year ago that he had terminal liver cancer, he had little choice but to take matters into his own hands. Meng, 75, a resident of Taiwan, had read that doctors at tiny Alhambra Hospital were successfully using an innovative technique to freeze and destroy malignant tumors. Hoping they might be able to help him, he contacted the hospital. But Meng was told that the doctors were performing the procedure only on prostate cancer patients.
BUSINESS
December 13, 2000 | Bloomberg News
Endocare Inc., an Irvine developer of cold-surgery and stent technologies, said Tuesday that it expects federal approval of Medicare coverage for its treatment of prostate cancer for patients who don't respond to radiation therapy. The company said the approval could come this week for the procedure, called cryosurgery, which uses extremely cold temperatures to kill diseased tissue.
NEWS
May 9, 1993
The first ultrasound-guided cryosurgery for prostate cancer in the greater Los Angeles area was successfully performed at Alhambra Hospital last month on a 52-year-old man. The surgery, which involves freezing and destroying prostate cancer cells, was performed by Drs. Douglas and Mahlon Chinn of the Chinn Urology Medical Group of Arcadia and Dr. Wilson Wong of the Arcadia Radiology Medical Group of Arcadia. Cryosurgery is also being used for treatment of liver tumors.
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