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March 28, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
KFC's new Li'l Bucket Kids Meals are launching at the chicken chain nationwide on the same day that consumer group Center for Science in the Public Interest said nearly all kids meals “flunk nutrition.” KFC's new packaging involves a smaller, colorful bucket covered with interactive games. Kids can choose from among several varieties of chicken, sides and drinks. Each container comes with a pouch of GoGo squeeZ applesauce, which looks a little bit like those plastic “flask on the fly” Pocket Shot booze bags that sparked controversy a few years back.
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BUSINESS
April 16, 2014 | By Tiffany Hsu
Artificial trans fat still lurks in our food, at least at the Joe's Crab Shack chain, according to a health watchdog group. The Center for Science in the Public Interest said Wednesday that the Houston-based seafood restaurant company uses a blend of partially hydrogenated margarine-butter blend containing dangerous levels of trans fat. Joe's Crab Shack, which was established in 1994, did not immediately respond to requests for comment....
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NEWS
March 5, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
In a letter to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the consumer watchdog group Center for Science in the Public Interest called on officials to ban the use of caramel coloring in popular soft drinks, citing a possible cancer risk.  This isn't the first time that CSPI has targeted the food additive that gives colas, including Coke and Pepsi, their familiar brown color. The organization first petitioned the FDA on the matter in 2011, noting that 2-methylimidazole and 4-methylimidazole, which form when sugar is mixed with ammonia and sulfites to create caramel coloring, had been shown to cause lung, liver and thyroid cancer in mice and rats.
BUSINESS
July 2, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu, This post has been updated. Please see below for details
Food-focused watchdog group Center for Science in the Public Interest has its hooks in Long John Silver's, accusing the seafood chain of serving the least healthful meal in the country. The advocacy group said it ran laboratory tests on the chain's Big Catch meal, including batter-fried haddock and side dishes such as hush puppies and onion rings. The results showed 33 grams of trans fat, according to the group -- or more than two weeks' worth of the two-grams-a-day allotment recommended by the American Heart Assn.
NEWS
July 2, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
The Center for Science in the Public Interest rarely makes friends in the nation's chain restaurants. The advocacy group frequently calls out foods it finds nutritionally objectionable. And on Tuesday, it put Long John Silver's Big Catch meal, with hush puppies and onion rings, in its spotlight, calling it the worst restaurant meal in America -- even though plenty of other choices have more calories. The CSPI said laboratory tests showed the Big Catch had 33 grams of trans fat, “the most powerful promoter of heart disease in the food supply,” and an additional 19 grams of saturated fat and nearly 3,700 milligrams of sodium -- more salt than is recommended for a day. The Big Catch has 1,320 calories.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2012 | By David Colker
The Center for Science in the Public Interest says its testing has found "high levels" of an animal carcinogen, 4-methylimidazole, in Coca-Cola and Pepsi cola drinks. The chemical is a result of the process used to give the colas -- including the diet versions -- their caramel coloring. But the federal Food and Drug Administration said there is not much to worry about, according to Bloomberg News. Agency spokesman Douglass Karas said Monday in a statement that a human would have to drink more than a thousand cans of the drinks in a day to reach the chemical level shown to cause cancer in rodents.  And the American Beverage Assn.
NEWS
March 28, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Ninety-one percent of thousands of children's meals at the biggest restaurant chains don't meet standards set by the National Restaurant Assn.'s own initiative for healthful kids' meals, a study out Thursday from a nutrition advocacy group says. And nine chains have no meals that meet those standards, the study says. The trade group's standards are voluntary, and it notes that among the participating chains, there are more than 340 healthful kids' items on menus. The Center for Science in the Public Interest did find some “good news” in its study: Nearly half the chains offer at least one healthier meal, said Ameena Batada, an assistant professor at the University of North Carolina who conducted the study.
BUSINESS
April 16, 2014 | By Tiffany Hsu
Artificial trans fat still lurks in our food, at least at the Joe's Crab Shack chain, according to a health watchdog group. The Center for Science in the Public Interest said Wednesday that the Houston-based seafood restaurant company uses a blend of partially hydrogenated margarine-butter blend containing dangerous levels of trans fat. Joe's Crab Shack, which was established in 1994, did not immediately respond to requests for comment....
NEWS
March 28, 2013 | By Jenn Harris
When you order a kids' meal at any restaurant, chances are you're not going to get a quinoa salad or grilled chicken with kale, hold the oil. Instead, you can bet on a basket of fried chicken fingers and fries or a bowl of macaroni and cheese. If anyone is surprised by this, please speak now. A recent study by the  Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) found that most restaurant kids' meals are still brimming with calories. PHOTOS: Outrageous fast food menu items Out of the 3,500 kids' meals surveyed for the study, 97% of them failed to meet nutritional standards, Reuters reported . Still, if you look back at how kids' meals fared in 2008, with 99% of the meals failing, you could say we're moving in the right direction.
NEWS
February 16, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
If you’re not alarmed by caramel colorings, you soon might be. A consumer group has urged the FDA to ban some of them. One guess as to which group. Yes, the Center for Science in the Public Interest. "The "caramel coloring" used in Coca-Cola, Pepsi, and other foods is contaminated with two cancer-causing chemicals and should be banned," the organization announced. Its news release helpfully links to the petition it filed with the FDA. The American Beverage Assn.
NEWS
July 2, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
The Center for Science in the Public Interest rarely makes friends in the nation's chain restaurants. The advocacy group frequently calls out foods it finds nutritionally objectionable. And on Tuesday, it put Long John Silver's Big Catch meal, with hush puppies and onion rings, in its spotlight, calling it the worst restaurant meal in America -- even though plenty of other choices have more calories. The CSPI said laboratory tests showed the Big Catch had 33 grams of trans fat, “the most powerful promoter of heart disease in the food supply,” and an additional 19 grams of saturated fat and nearly 3,700 milligrams of sodium -- more salt than is recommended for a day. The Big Catch has 1,320 calories.
NEWS
March 28, 2013 | By Jenn Harris
When you order a kids' meal at any restaurant, chances are you're not going to get a quinoa salad or grilled chicken with kale, hold the oil. Instead, you can bet on a basket of fried chicken fingers and fries or a bowl of macaroni and cheese. If anyone is surprised by this, please speak now. A recent study by the  Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) found that most restaurant kids' meals are still brimming with calories. PHOTOS: Outrageous fast food menu items Out of the 3,500 kids' meals surveyed for the study, 97% of them failed to meet nutritional standards, Reuters reported . Still, if you look back at how kids' meals fared in 2008, with 99% of the meals failing, you could say we're moving in the right direction.
NEWS
March 28, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Ninety-one percent of thousands of children's meals at the biggest restaurant chains don't meet standards set by the National Restaurant Assn.'s own initiative for healthful kids' meals, a study out Thursday from a nutrition advocacy group says. And nine chains have no meals that meet those standards, the study says. The trade group's standards are voluntary, and it notes that among the participating chains, there are more than 340 healthful kids' items on menus. The Center for Science in the Public Interest did find some “good news” in its study: Nearly half the chains offer at least one healthier meal, said Ameena Batada, an assistant professor at the University of North Carolina who conducted the study.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
KFC's new Li'l Bucket Kids Meals are launching at the chicken chain nationwide on the same day that consumer group Center for Science in the Public Interest said nearly all kids meals “flunk nutrition.” KFC's new packaging involves a smaller, colorful bucket covered with interactive games. Kids can choose from among several varieties of chicken, sides and drinks. Each container comes with a pouch of GoGo squeeZ applesauce, which looks a little bit like those plastic “flask on the fly” Pocket Shot booze bags that sparked controversy a few years back.
NEWS
February 8, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
It's Girl Scout cookie time, and in some regions this year's offerings include Mango Cremes. Though not as famous as the classic Thin Mints, Mango Cremes feature “vanilla and coconut cookies filled with a tangy mango-flavored creme enhanced with nutrients derived from fruits,” according to the Girl Scouts website. Nutrients? Have Girl Scout cookies become a health food? Here's what ABC Bakers, the company that produces Mango Cremes, has to say about that on its website: “These crunchy vanilla and coconut cookies with a mango-flavored creme filling have all the nutrient benefits of eating cranberries, pomegranates, oranges, grapes, and strawberries.” Seriously?
NEWS
January 30, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
It's rare for the people at the Center for Science in the Public Interest to praise a fast-food company, but Taco Bell came in for some this week - for pulling an ad that had been dinged by CSPI as an attack on vegetables. The ad called bringing veggies to a party on game day “like punting on fourth and one; it's a cop-out” that people will even “secretly hate you for.” The ad promoted the Taco Bell “variety 12-pack” of tacos. In the 15-second ad, interesting to note, the lettuce is very visible in the taco shells.
NEWS
January 16, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Let's be real here. Anyone who orders a meal with three pieces of breaded chicken, a buttery sauce, and mashed potatoes can't be much surprised that it's high in calories. Or that a piece of cake that weighs close to a pound might, as they say, be applied “directly to the hips.” So why would the Center for Science in the Public Interest - advocacy group or nutrition nag, depending on your perspective - give a dubious shout-out to those restaurant choices and several others on Wednesday by handing out “Xtreme Eating Awards”?
BUSINESS
July 2, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu, This post has been updated. Please see below for details
Food-focused watchdog group Center for Science in the Public Interest has its hooks in Long John Silver's, accusing the seafood chain of serving the least healthful meal in the country. The advocacy group said it ran laboratory tests on the chain's Big Catch meal, including batter-fried haddock and side dishes such as hush puppies and onion rings. The results showed 33 grams of trans fat, according to the group -- or more than two weeks' worth of the two-grams-a-day allotment recommended by the American Heart Assn.
NEWS
January 16, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Let's be real here. Anyone who orders a meal with three pieces of breaded chicken, a buttery sauce, and mashed potatoes can't be much surprised that it's high in calories. Or that a piece of cake that weighs close to a pound might, as they say, be applied “directly to the hips.” So why would the Center for Science in the Public Interest - advocacy group or nutrition nag, depending on your perspective - give a dubious shout-out to those restaurant choices and several others on Wednesday by handing out “Xtreme Eating Awards”?
BUSINESS
March 5, 2012 | By David Colker
The Center for Science in the Public Interest says its testing has found "high levels" of an animal carcinogen, 4-methylimidazole, in Coca-Cola and Pepsi cola drinks. The chemical is a result of the process used to give the colas -- including the diet versions -- their caramel coloring. But the federal Food and Drug Administration said there is not much to worry about, according to Bloomberg News. Agency spokesman Douglass Karas said Monday in a statement that a human would have to drink more than a thousand cans of the drinks in a day to reach the chemical level shown to cause cancer in rodents.  And the American Beverage Assn.
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