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June 7, 2013 | By Dylan Hernandez
One swing of the bat and more than 44,000 fans in Dodger Stadium erupted. As the ball sailed over the right-field fence - with the bases loaded - even Hall of Fame broadcaster Vin Scully was at a loss. "I don't believe it!" he exclaimed to television viewers. "A grand-slam home run!" On the Dodgers radio broadcast, veteran announcer Charley Steiner shouted, "This doesn't happen even in Hollywood!" As the stadium shook with emotion and Dodgers in the dugout exchanged high-fives and hugs, a chiseled 6-foot-3, 245-pound ballplayer circled the bases.
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OPINION
April 15, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Fleeing Cuba is harrowing and costly, whether it's done in a flimsy boat headed for U.S. shores or a speedboat headed for Mexico. Yasiel Puig, the gifted Dodgers outfielder, set off on the latter route, smuggled out by men who then threatened his life and held him hostage in a Mexican motel. A Florida man with a small-time criminal past helped get him out; in exchange, Puig promised to pay the man 20% of his lifetime earnings. Puig's difficult journey was the result of the longtime U.S. economic embargo on Cuba, which, among other things, makes it illegal for Major League Baseball to hire players directly from Cuba, a veritable incubator of baseball talent.
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SPORTS
March 13, 2014 | By Dylan Hernandez
PHOENIX - The Dodgers might have become considerably more entertaining Thursday. Erisbel Arruebarrena reported to camp. Arruebarrena, a 23-year-old shortstop, said he plays with the same flair and emotion as Yasiel Puig, his childhood friend from Cuba. “That's typical of Latinos,” Arruebarrena said. Like Puig, he will be well-compensated. Arruebarrena's five-year contract is guaranteed for $25 million. Arruebarrena and Puig have known each other since they were 9 years old. They lived near each other in the province of Cienfuegos and played for its team in the Cuban league.
SPORTS
April 14, 2014 | From Times staff writers
The Dodgers and Major League Baseball declined to comment Monday about a magazine article detailing Yasiel Puig's dangerous escape from Cuba and the death threats the 23-year-old right fielder received last year from human traffickers under control of a major Mexican drug cartel. Through a team spokesman, Puig also declined to comment on the story, which is scheduled to run in the May issue of Los Angeles Magazine. Puig has never talked about how he left Cuba. The Dodgers and MLB wouldn't say what measures they have taken to ensure the safety of Puig and his teammates, though the club is known to have hired full-time security detail last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1994
There exists within our hemisphere a nation that has embodied all of the goals and ideals that President Clinton envisions for America. It is a nation where all citizens have universal health coverage and no one is allowed to own a gun. That nation is Cuba. RON YORKE Reseda
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2011
Cuba at the Bowl With: Orquesta Buena Vista Social Club with Omara Portuondo; Arturo Sandoval with Natalie Cole and the L.A. All Star Big Band; Ninety Miles Where: Hollywood Bowl, 2301 N. Highland Ave., Hollywood When: 8 p.m. Wednesday Tickets: $1 to $130 Information: (323) 850-2000 or http://www.laphil.com
OPINION
March 16, 2013
Re "Cross Cuba off the blacklist," Editorial, March 13 I toured Cuba last week as part of a college alumni educational exchange and saw firsthand the effects of the 50-plus-year-old U.S. embargo. Cuba is changing slowly, and it is time for the U.S. to reevaluate its hostility to this imperfect island nation. Cuba has made some egregious blunders, but our record is not spotless either. Carolyn A. Scheer Irvine ALSO: Letters: Prayer for the pope Letters: A stand-alone MOCA Letters: A taxing debate on gun control
TRAVEL
November 22, 2009 | From The Los Angeles Times
ITALY Presentation David Farley discusses his new book, "An Irreverent Curiosity: In Search of the Church's Strangest Relic in Italy's Oddest Town," an account of his time living in a Bohemian hill town near Rome. When, where: 7:30 p.m. Monday at Distant Lands, 56 S. Raymond Ave., Pasadena. Admission, info: Free. RSVP to (626) 449-3220. CUBA Slide show Mort Loveman will present "Cuba: A Cultural Experience." When, where: 1 p.m. Wednesday at Roxbury Park Community Center, 471 S. Roxbury Drive, Beverly Hills.
WORLD
May 30, 2013 | By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Cuba further distanced itself from terrorist activities last year but the U.S. government still considers it a state sponsor of terrorism along with Syria, Iran and Sudan, according to the State Department's annual report. The report for 2012, released Thursday, says the government in Cuba last year reduced support for Basque separatists in Southern Europe, joined a regional group that seeks to block terrorism financing, and sponsored peace talks between Colombia and an armed rebel group.
OPINION
June 30, 2009 | Andres Martinez, Andres Martinez is a senior fellow at the New America Foundation.
The images were decidedly retro and jarring in their distant familiarity, as if a grainy old family film long left in the attic had been brought out for a screening. In defense of la patria, army troops overpowered el palacio at dawn and placed el presidente on an airplane to be flown into exile, still wearing his pajamas. Sunday's coup in Honduras followed a script once so familiar it acquired cliche status, material even for a Woody Allen sendup.
SPORTS
April 14, 2014 | Bill Plaschke
Seemingly from the moment Cuban refugee Yasiel Puig showed up at Dodger Stadium out of nowhere, arriving last June unwilling to discuss his unknown background, the talk behind the batting cages has been rife with unprintable rumors. There were rumors Puig was smuggled out of Cuba by members of a Mexican drug cartel. There were rumors he still owed the smugglers money, and that his life could be in jeopardy. There was talk about Puig being essentially owned by a Miami businessman with a criminal record who hired those smugglers in exchange for 20% of the ballplayer's future earnings.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2014 | By Lauren Beale
Cuba Gooding Jr. has sold his house in Pacific Palisades for $9,828,300. Yes, yes, someone showed him the money, to borrow his line from “Jerry Maguire.” The nearly one acre of grounds is set up for family fun. A sunken trampoline -- think user safety -- sits in the lawn, there's a swimming pool and the sports court can double as a lighted roller hockey rink or a basketball court. The contemporary English-style two-story house features French doors, five fireplaces, beamed ceilings, a media room, seven bedrooms, 6.5 bathrooms, a wine cellar and upstairs and downstairs laundry rooms - another great idea.
SPORTS
March 13, 2014 | By Dylan Hernandez
PHOENIX - The Dodgers might have become considerably more entertaining Thursday. Erisbel Arruebarrena reported to camp. Arruebarrena, a 23-year-old shortstop, said he plays with the same flair and emotion as Yasiel Puig, his childhood friend from Cuba. “That's typical of Latinos,” Arruebarrena said. Like Puig, he will be well-compensated. Arruebarrena's five-year contract is guaranteed for $25 million. Arruebarrena and Puig have known each other since they were 9 years old. They lived near each other in the province of Cienfuegos and played for its team in the Cuban league.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
A racy, rambling and funny letter written by Ernest Hemingway to Marlene Dietrich, in which the famous novelist calls the German movie star “Dearest Kraut” and playfully imagines her naked, is going on auction later this month.  Hemingway wrote the letter in 1955 from his estate in Cuba, on letterhead he had made with the property's name, Fincia Vigia. It's up for sale as part of trove of belongings of the late actress that were left to her three grandchildren, the Hollywood Reporter writes . Dietrich was then working in Las Vegas and had written to Hemingway complaining about the staging of her act there.
OPINION
March 8, 2014
Re "How do Americans see Cuba?," Opinion, March 6 Robyn Wapner is wrong to define the recent Atlantic Council survey of American opinions on Cuba as "one survey, one snapshot of public opinion, and one that appears to have had an agenda. " There have been a number of similar polls in recent years, and they all come up with strikingly similar results. The Atlantic Council poll results in 2014 show that 60% of Americans "want all economic restrictions lifted. " A 2012 poll by Angus-Reid of more than 1,000 Americans found that 62% wanted diplomatic relations reestablished.
OPINION
March 6, 2014 | By Robyn J. Wapner
The Washington-based think tank Atlantic Council released a poll last month that has been touted by many as marking an unprecedented shift in support for a change in U.S. policy toward Cuba. Media outlets, including the L.A. Times, jumped on the bandwagon, citing the poll as evidence that Americans are now eager for engagement. But a closer look shows that many of the most consequential results of the poll are based on push-polling tactics. Push polling is the craft of designing survey questions to shape and influence the results.
NEWS
December 24, 2011
Dolores Merino of Los Angeles was on vacation in Cuba early this month when she came across these women in old Havana who brightened the mood.    
NEWS
May 22, 2013 | By Jane Engle
Globus has joined the ranks of well-known tour companies offering trips to Cuba under a special U.S. Treasury Department license that permits people-to-people educational exchanges on the Communist island. Its nine-day “ Undiscovered Cuba ” itinerary, based in Havana, includes a city tour led by a local architect; meetings with musicians and university students and local car club members; dinner at a family-owned paladar (privately owned restaurant), with a discussion of the free-enterprise system; a visit with a tobacco farmer and his family; and an excursion to the home of late novelist Ernest Hemingway . Beach time is not on the agenda.
OPINION
February 16, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
The United States and Cuba have been locked in the coldest of relationships for more than half a century. But a new poll suggests that the American people think it's time to warm things up a bit. We agree. The poll, commissioned by the Washington-based Atlantic Council research group, found that 6 in 10 Americans favor normalizing diplomatic relations with Cuba. The numbers are stronger in Florida than in the nation as a whole, and support holds even among Latinos in that state, which is where the bulk of the Cuban expatriate community resides.
OPINION
February 6, 2014
Re "The voyage back," Feb. 3 Thanks to Robert Krakow for writing the play "The Trial of Franklin Delano Roosevelt," and to The Times for printing the article about the hundreds of European Jewish refugees in 1939 who were refused entry into Cuba and the U.S. and sent back to die in the Holocaust. This was one of America's darkest and most inhumane decisions. Perhaps we should remember "give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free" when we think of American values.
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