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NEWS
September 7, 1996 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton's special envoy on Cuba acknowledged Friday that he has encountered little but anger and venom in his first meetings with allied officials as he tries to work out a joint Cuba policy. The anger is directed mainly at the Helms-Burton law, which penalizes foreign companies that do business in Cuba using property once owned by Americans. Commerce Undersecretary Stuart Eizenstat said that, despite the anger over the law--sponsored by Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.) and Rep.
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NEWS
March 7, 1998 | From Associated Press
A jovial Fidel Castro put on a lavish welcome Friday for more than 50 American executives who had come to Cuba to explore possible post-embargo business opportunities. The Cuban government sponsored the hotel buffet to avoid a U.S. ban on citizens spending money in Cuba. "And who is paying for this?" Castro asked with mock sternness as he entered the hall. "It's an investment for the future," Castro said, before spending about an hour moving through the crowd of businesspeople.
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BUSINESS
September 4, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Cuba to Liberalize Laws for Foreign Investors: Despite its repeated vows to retain socialism, the island nation is poised to approve a law that will give foreign capitalists the right to fully control business enterprises. Sunday's weekly Juventud Rebelde called the new Law on Foreign Investments "a daring step." The law is expected to be approved by Cuba's national Parliament today.
NEWS
January 4, 1997 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton, citing evidence that "the international community is more united behind the cause of freedom in Cuba than ever before," ordered a second six-month suspension Friday of a law allowing American lawsuits against foreign companies doing business in Cuba. The suspension further delays the implementation of the most contentious provision of a 1996 law that has infuriated American allies.
BUSINESS
July 16, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Cuba Talking to Foreign Banks: In the most recent move toward relaxation of government controls on its socialist economy, Cuba is talking to foreign banks about opening offices on the island, the deputy governor of the central bank told an investment conference in Cancun, Mexico. Discussions of joint banking ventures with several international banks are in preliminary stages, said Raul Amado. Currently, Cuba has three banks, all government-owned.
BUSINESS
September 6, 1995 | DOUGLAS FARAH, THE WASHINGTON POST
In one of its sharpest breaks yet from socialist dogma, the Cuban government Tuesday approved a law greatly increasing the role of foreign investment in the battered economy and allowing creation of free-trade zones.
NEWS
March 6, 1996 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ignoring angry protests from the United States' closest allies, the Senate passed legislation Tuesday that would tighten sanctions on Cuba so stringently that foreign companies doing business there could face lawsuits in U.S. courts. Until recently, the legislation had been opposed by President Clinton, who agreed with the Canadian and European governments that its provisions would impinge on the right of other countries to engage in international commerce and investment.
NEWS
March 7, 1998 | From Associated Press
A jovial Fidel Castro put on a lavish welcome Friday for more than 50 American executives who had come to Cuba to explore possible post-embargo business opportunities. The Cuban government sponsored the hotel buffet to avoid a U.S. ban on citizens spending money in Cuba. "And who is paying for this?" Castro asked with mock sternness as he entered the hall. "It's an investment for the future," Castro said, before spending about an hour moving through the crowd of businesspeople.
NEWS
July 17, 1996 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Tuesday delayed harsh new penalties on foreign companies that do business with Cuba, saying that postponing such measures could boost international pressure to force the Fidel Castro regime to a democratic path. Hoping to defuse a threat to U.S. foreign policy interests and possibly also to his reelection, Clinton announced a choice fashioned to blunt the most drastic consequences of an anti-Castro law that will go into effect Aug. 1.
BUSINESS
May 9, 1996 | From Associated Press
A new law tightening sanctions against Cuba will not affect visas for foreign business executives who began operating on confiscated U.S. property before March 12, the State Department said Wednesday. Spokesman Nicholas Burns said U.S. visas will be denied only to those foreigners who "trafficked" in such property after that date, when the Helms-Burton legislation was signed by President Clinton.
BUSINESS
October 10, 1996 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Curtis Carlson, a Minneapolis tycoon who runs an empire of tourist hotels, restaurants and cruise ships, accepted an invitation from Fidel Castro five years ago to assess whether it would make sense to invest in Cuba. So impressed was Carlson that he initiated plans for building two Radisson hotels, renovating an old Cuban hotel, opening several TGI Friday restaurants and making Havana a regular call of Caribbean cruise ships. "There is a pent-up demand for this destination," said T.
BUSINESS
October 4, 1996 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pity poor Javier Garza Calderon, president of the Mexican company Grupo Domos, which manages Cuba's telephone company. The U.S. government has warned the executive to dump his Cuban investment by today--or lose the visas that let him, his family and several other executives enter the United States. Garza Calderon typically visits 60 times a year.
NEWS
September 7, 1996 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton's special envoy on Cuba acknowledged Friday that he has encountered little but anger and venom in his first meetings with allied officials as he tries to work out a joint Cuba policy. The anger is directed mainly at the Helms-Burton law, which penalizes foreign companies that do business in Cuba using property once owned by Americans. Commerce Undersecretary Stuart Eizenstat said that, despite the anger over the law--sponsored by Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.) and Rep.
NEWS
July 17, 1996 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Tuesday delayed harsh new penalties on foreign companies that do business with Cuba, saying that postponing such measures could boost international pressure to force the Fidel Castro regime to a democratic path. Hoping to defuse a threat to U.S. foreign policy interests and possibly also to his reelection, Clinton announced a choice fashioned to blunt the most drastic consequences of an anti-Castro law that will go into effect Aug. 1.
BUSINESS
May 30, 1996 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A giant Mexican cement company has become the first foreign firm to bow to U.S. demands that it pull out of Cuba, a striking illustration of the threat posed by a controversial new U.S. law that has angered American trading partners around the world. The company, Cementos Mexicanos, has pulled out of the communist country rather than face possible penalties from Washington against its U.S. operations, U.S. officials said Wednesday.
BUSINESS
May 9, 1996 | From Associated Press
A new law tightening sanctions against Cuba will not affect visas for foreign business executives who began operating on confiscated U.S. property before March 12, the State Department said Wednesday. Spokesman Nicholas Burns said U.S. visas will be denied only to those foreigners who "trafficked" in such property after that date, when the Helms-Burton legislation was signed by President Clinton.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1995 | From Reuters
Foreign investment is the only way Cuba can rebuild its battered economy, but this does not mean the country is up for sale, President Fidel Castro said in an interview published Wednesday. "The opening is fairly wide. The joint ventures that are operating are working well, they have had a lot of success, and in fact, we would not have had another way out without this participation of foreign capital in the development of the country," Castro said.
BUSINESS
October 4, 1996 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pity poor Javier Garza Calderon, president of the Mexican company Grupo Domos, which manages Cuba's telephone company. The U.S. government has warned the executive to dump his Cuban investment by today--or lose the visas that let him, his family and several other executives enter the United States. Garza Calderon typically visits 60 times a year.
NEWS
March 6, 1996 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ignoring angry protests from the United States' closest allies, the Senate passed legislation Tuesday that would tighten sanctions on Cuba so stringently that foreign companies doing business there could face lawsuits in U.S. courts. Until recently, the legislation had been opposed by President Clinton, who agreed with the Canadian and European governments that its provisions would impinge on the right of other countries to engage in international commerce and investment.
BUSINESS
September 6, 1995 | DOUGLAS FARAH, THE WASHINGTON POST
In one of its sharpest breaks yet from socialist dogma, the Cuban government Tuesday approved a law greatly increasing the role of foreign investment in the battered economy and allowing creation of free-trade zones.
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