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NEWS
July 28, 1991 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South African anti-apartheid leader Nelson Mandela ended a three-day visit here Saturday after an unhesitant embrace of Cuban President Fidel Castro's Communist revolution, which he called "a source of inspiration to all freedom-loving people." "We admire the sacrifices of the Cuban people in maintaining their independence and sovereignty in the face of a vicious, imperialist-orchestrated campaign," Mandela told a rally at which he was Castro's honored guest.
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NEWS
March 28, 1998 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Exhibiting the moral authority he draws from his extraordinary personal history, South African President Nelson Mandela on Friday pointedly told President Clinton to follow his lead and negotiate face-to-face with his enemies to solve conflicts peacefully. Mandela added that he intends to remain "loyal" to old friends--such as Cuba and Libya--even if it displeases the Clinton administration.
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NEWS
August 11, 1988
About 2,000 South African soldiers began withdrawing from Angola, the Pretoria government said, in the first phase of a peace plan that could lead to independence for Namibia (South-West Africa). In accordance with a cease-fire agreement with Angola and Cuba, the South Africans are to have moved across the southern border of Angola into the South African-administered territory by Sept. 1.
NEWS
February 28, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Fidel Castro's Cuba may be a polecat in the U.S., but hugs, flowers and chants of "Viva Fidel!" greeted a delegation of 96 Cuban doctors who arrived here Tuesday to work in rural hospitals. Dr. Nkosazana Zuma, South Africa's health minister, welcomed the jet-lagged physicians as they passed through a cheering crowd at the international airport. She said they would be sent immediately to communities where South African doctors are reluctant to serve.
NEWS
February 28, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Fidel Castro's Cuba may be a polecat in the U.S., but hugs, flowers and chants of "Viva Fidel!" greeted a delegation of 96 Cuban doctors who arrived here Tuesday to work in rural hospitals. Dr. Nkosazana Zuma, South Africa's health minister, welcomed the jet-lagged physicians as they passed through a cheering crowd at the international airport. She said they would be sent immediately to communities where South African doctors are reluctant to serve.
NEWS
December 4, 1988 | WILLIAM CLAIBORNE, The Washington Post
South African, Angolan and Cuban negotiators failed to reach agreement on a southern Africa peace plan and independence for Namibia that they had hoped to sign Saturday. Shortly before flying back to Johannesburg with Foreign Minister Roelof F.
NEWS
July 21, 1988 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
The governments of Angola, Cuba and South Africa have officially accepted 14 principles for settling the 13-year Angolan civil war and granting neighboring Namibia its independence from South Africa, Assistant Secretary of State Chester A. Crocker announced Wednesday. South African Foreign Minister Roelof F. (Pik) Botha, in confirming his government's approval, said in Pretoria that the agreement would contribute "to a lessening of tensions in southern Africa."
NEWS
February 18, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Cuba is undermining a new southern Africa regional peace plan requiring complete withdrawal of its 50,000 or so soldiers from Angola by sending in fresh troops to replace at least some of those it has removed, U.S.-backed Angolan guerrillas charge. Moreover, officials of Jonas Savimbi's National Union for the Total Independence of Angola assert that at least some of the withdrawing Cuban troops have been sent to nearby African countries instead of returning to Cuba.
NEWS
March 28, 1998 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Exhibiting the moral authority he draws from his extraordinary personal history, South African President Nelson Mandela on Friday pointedly told President Clinton to follow his lead and negotiate face-to-face with his enemies to solve conflicts peacefully. Mandela added that he intends to remain "loyal" to old friends--such as Cuba and Libya--even if it displeases the Clinton administration.
NEWS
July 28, 1991 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South African anti-apartheid leader Nelson Mandela ended a three-day visit here Saturday after an unhesitant embrace of Cuban President Fidel Castro's Communist revolution, which he called "a source of inspiration to all freedom-loving people." "We admire the sacrifices of the Cuban people in maintaining their independence and sovereignty in the face of a vicious, imperialist-orchestrated campaign," Mandela told a rally at which he was Castro's honored guest.
NEWS
February 18, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Cuba is undermining a new southern Africa regional peace plan requiring complete withdrawal of its 50,000 or so soldiers from Angola by sending in fresh troops to replace at least some of those it has removed, U.S.-backed Angolan guerrillas charge. Moreover, officials of Jonas Savimbi's National Union for the Total Independence of Angola assert that at least some of the withdrawing Cuban troops have been sent to nearby African countries instead of returning to Cuba.
NEWS
December 4, 1988 | WILLIAM CLAIBORNE, The Washington Post
South African, Angolan and Cuban negotiators failed to reach agreement on a southern Africa peace plan and independence for Namibia that they had hoped to sign Saturday. Shortly before flying back to Johannesburg with Foreign Minister Roelof F.
NEWS
August 11, 1988
About 2,000 South African soldiers began withdrawing from Angola, the Pretoria government said, in the first phase of a peace plan that could lead to independence for Namibia (South-West Africa). In accordance with a cease-fire agreement with Angola and Cuba, the South Africans are to have moved across the southern border of Angola into the South African-administered territory by Sept. 1.
NEWS
July 21, 1988 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
The governments of Angola, Cuba and South Africa have officially accepted 14 principles for settling the 13-year Angolan civil war and granting neighboring Namibia its independence from South Africa, Assistant Secretary of State Chester A. Crocker announced Wednesday. South African Foreign Minister Roelof F. (Pik) Botha, in confirming his government's approval, said in Pretoria that the agreement would contribute "to a lessening of tensions in southern Africa."
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