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Cuba Military Assaults

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NEWS
June 5, 1994 | From Associated Press
Cuban gunboats fired for more than four hours Saturday on a Cuban freighter loaded with Florida-bound refugees who reportedly hijacked the vessel. Seven people were injured, one critically. Four of the wounded, including the ship's captain, were taken by Coast Guard helicopters to Key West Memorial Hospital. Three people who were hurt scrambling for cover during the shooting were treated on the ship, Coast Guard officials said.
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NEWS
August 5, 1999 | MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They met in church, fell in love and married. And for 11 months they enjoyed a happy conjugal life. But now, says Ana Margarita Martinez, every time that she and her husband made love, she was raped. Not by her husband, Juan Pablo Roque. By Cuba.
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NEWS
February 26, 1996 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Charging that the two small civilian planes shot down by a Cuban MIG-29 over the Florida Straits were in international airspace, Secretary of State Warren Christopher on Sunday accused the Cuban government of blatantly violating international law and warned that the United States is considering a range of retaliatory actions.
NEWS
May 8, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The alleged leader of a Cuban spy ring was charged with conspiring to commit murder, the first criminal count filed in the deadly 1996 downing of four pilots by a Cuban warplane. An indictment unsealed in Miami alleges Gerardo Hernandez conspired with the Cuban military to provoke a violent confrontation with Brothers to the Rescue, an exile group that searches for Cuban refugees at sea. A Cuban fighter attacked two of the Brothers' planes over international waters in 1996.
NEWS
May 8, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The alleged leader of a Cuban spy ring was charged with conspiring to commit murder, the first criminal count filed in the deadly 1996 downing of four pilots by a Cuban warplane. An indictment unsealed in Miami alleges Gerardo Hernandez conspired with the Cuban military to provoke a violent confrontation with Brothers to the Rescue, an exile group that searches for Cuban refugees at sea. A Cuban fighter attacked two of the Brothers' planes over international waters in 1996.
NEWS
March 7, 1996 | Associated Press
Cuba defended its downing of two U.S. civilian aircraft as a "patriotic action," telling the United Nations on Wednesday that the exile group flying the planes planned raids against the Communist state. Cuban Foreign Minister Roberto Robaina told the 185-member U.N. General Assembly that the Miami-based Brothers to the Rescue had plans to dynamite power lines in Havana, sabotage the Cienfuegos oil refinery and carry out attacks on Cuban leaders. U.S.
NEWS
March 8, 1996 | Times Staff Writer
Cuba is studying the possibility of closing its airspace to all U.S. planes because of continued American pressure over the two civilian planes shot down by Cuban jet fighters on Feb. 24, a Foreign Relations Ministry spokeswoman said Thursday. Other measures also are being studied, Marianela Ferriol said during her weekly news conference, but she declined to specify what they are. Prohibiting U.S.
NEWS
February 26, 1996 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The dream of wresting control of Cuba from Fidel Castro has animated a long line of Cuban American exiles in Miami, starting with members of the brigade that met its destruction at the Bay of Pigs in 1961. In today's Miami, few are more audacious than those who call themselves Brothers to the Rescue.
NEWS
February 27, 1996 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton severed all remaining commercial air links with Cuba on Monday and outlined additional sanctions to punish Fidel Castro's government for shooting down two unarmed civilian aircraft, but he stopped far short of a naval blockade or other military action. In a brief statement to reporters at the White House, Clinton scoffed at Cuba's explanation that the planes, operated by an anti-Castro Cuban emigre group, were destroyed because they had violated Cuban airspace.
NEWS
August 5, 1999 | MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They met in church, fell in love and married. And for 11 months they enjoyed a happy conjugal life. But now, says Ana Margarita Martinez, every time that she and her husband made love, she was raped. Not by her husband, Juan Pablo Roque. By Cuba.
NEWS
November 14, 1997 | Associated Press
Families of three Americans killed when Cuban military jets shot down two private planes asked for $79 million in damages Thursday as the first trial under a new anti-terrorism law opened. Cuban MIGs shot down the Brothers to the Rescue planes Feb. 24, 1996, as the Americans patrolled the Florida Straits, looking for refugees trying to escape Cuba in rafts and small boats. Cuba, which has claimed that the planes violated its airspace, has refused to recognize U.S.
NEWS
March 8, 1996 | Times Staff Writer
Cuba is studying the possibility of closing its airspace to all U.S. planes because of continued American pressure over the two civilian planes shot down by Cuban jet fighters on Feb. 24, a Foreign Relations Ministry spokeswoman said Thursday. Other measures also are being studied, Marianela Ferriol said during her weekly news conference, but she declined to specify what they are. Prohibiting U.S.
NEWS
March 7, 1996 | Associated Press
Cuba defended its downing of two U.S. civilian aircraft as a "patriotic action," telling the United Nations on Wednesday that the exile group flying the planes planned raids against the Communist state. Cuban Foreign Minister Roberto Robaina told the 185-member U.N. General Assembly that the Miami-based Brothers to the Rescue had plans to dynamite power lines in Havana, sabotage the Cienfuegos oil refinery and carry out attacks on Cuban leaders. U.S.
NEWS
February 27, 1996 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton severed all remaining commercial air links with Cuba on Monday and outlined additional sanctions to punish Fidel Castro's government for shooting down two unarmed civilian aircraft, but he stopped far short of a naval blockade or other military action. In a brief statement to reporters at the White House, Clinton scoffed at Cuba's explanation that the planes, operated by an anti-Castro Cuban emigre group, were destroyed because they had violated Cuban airspace.
NEWS
February 26, 1996 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The dream of wresting control of Cuba from Fidel Castro has animated a long line of Cuban American exiles in Miami, starting with members of the brigade that met its destruction at the Bay of Pigs in 1961. In today's Miami, few are more audacious than those who call themselves Brothers to the Rescue.
NEWS
February 26, 1996 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Charging that the two small civilian planes shot down by a Cuban MIG-29 over the Florida Straits were in international airspace, Secretary of State Warren Christopher on Sunday accused the Cuban government of blatantly violating international law and warned that the United States is considering a range of retaliatory actions.
NEWS
November 14, 1997 | Associated Press
Families of three Americans killed when Cuban military jets shot down two private planes asked for $79 million in damages Thursday as the first trial under a new anti-terrorism law opened. Cuban MIGs shot down the Brothers to the Rescue planes Feb. 24, 1996, as the Americans patrolled the Florida Straits, looking for refugees trying to escape Cuba in rafts and small boats. Cuba, which has claimed that the planes violated its airspace, has refused to recognize U.S.
NEWS
June 5, 1994 | From Associated Press
Cuban gunboats fired for more than four hours Saturday on a Cuban freighter loaded with Florida-bound refugees who reportedly hijacked the vessel. Seven people were injured, one critically. Four of the wounded, including the ship's captain, were taken by Coast Guard helicopters to Key West Memorial Hospital. Three people who were hurt scrambling for cover during the shooting were treated on the ship, Coast Guard officials said.
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