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NEWS
February 14, 1988
Angola is willing to have Cuban troops withdrawn from its soil if the United States and South Africa end support for right-wing Angolan rebels, the official ANGOP news agency said, quoting Foreign Minister Afonso Van-Dunem. The report also listed other longstanding Angolan demands for a regional peace settlement, including withdrawal of South African military forces from southern Angola, and independence for Namibia.
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NEWS
February 14, 1988
Angola is willing to have Cuban troops withdrawn from its soil if the United States and South Africa end support for right-wing Angolan rebels, the official ANGOP news agency said, quoting Foreign Minister Afonso Van-Dunem. The report also listed other longstanding Angolan demands for a regional peace settlement, including withdrawal of South African military forces from southern Angola, and independence for Namibia.
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NEWS
February 2, 1988 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration said Monday that it has made major progress toward the withdrawalof 40,000 Cuban troops from Angola after U.S. officials for the first time met directly with a Cuban delegation to discuss the pullout. In the past, Angola has held out the possibility that Cuban troops might stay in the country indefinitely, thus maintaining a position from which they might influence future developments throughout southern Africa.
NEWS
February 2, 1988 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration said Monday that it has made major progress toward the withdrawalof 40,000 Cuban troops from Angola after U.S. officials for the first time met directly with a Cuban delegation to discuss the pullout. In the past, Angola has held out the possibility that Cuban troops might stay in the country indefinitely, thus maintaining a position from which they might influence future developments throughout southern Africa.
NEWS
November 12, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
South African troops, fighting on the side of rightist guerrillas in the Angolan civil war, recently clashed in a major air and tank battle with Soviet and Cuban forces supporting the government there, the South African defense headquarters reported Wednesday. Gen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1987
The U.S. and South Africa have been meddling in Angola since the early 1970s. This is the cause of the present-day violence, not the Cubans. Angola has a right to defend itself and who else is there to turn to but the Soviet-bloc countries? If the U.S. would cease funding UNITA, UNITA would disappear and the Angolan government could address itself to the issues of poverty and hunger. LISA M. EDMONDSON Santa Monica
NEWS
October 31, 1987 | From Reuters
Angolan rebels said Friday that they had captured two Cubans after shooting down their MIG-23 jet over Angola's eastern province of Moxico. Cuba, in an unprecedented public admission, confirmed the incident in a Defense Ministry statement issued in Havana. The National Union for the Total Independence of Angola, known by its Portuguese acronym UNITA, issued a statement here, identifying the Cubans as Lt. Col. Manuel Rocas Garcia and Capt. Ramos Cazados.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1989
Heavy fighting was reported in Angola last week between government troops and the rebel forces of UNITA leader Jonas Savimbi. What caused the collapse of a truce that was painstakingly stitched together in June by heads of neighboring African states is not precisely clear. But President Bush's refusal, in deference to his party's right wing, to stop sending $15 million to $18 million worth of arms a year to Savimbi certainly is a factor to be regretted.
OPINION
January 3, 1988
A mediated settlement of the stalemated 12-year-old guerrilla war in Angola has been proposed by the leaders of three African nations, and the principal guerrilla leader has indicated his willingness to join the talks. That is encouraging. It is encouraging from two points of view: The war has been devastating, particularly in the terrible toll that it has exacted from the impoverished civilian population.
NEWS
April 1, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
For more than a decade, Martti Ahtisaari has had one of the United Nations' most frustrating assignments--to bring the sparsely populated territory of Namibia to independence against the wishes of its colonial governor, South Africa. When the 51-year-old Finnish diplomat and his wife arrived here Friday, it marked the end of those difficult years and the beginning of Namibia's journey "to its rightful place among the community of nations," Ahtisaari said.
NEWS
November 12, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
South African troops, fighting on the side of rightist guerrillas in the Angolan civil war, recently clashed in a major air and tank battle with Soviet and Cuban forces supporting the government there, the South African defense headquarters reported Wednesday. Gen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1989
Friday will mark the end of Ronald Reagan's presidency, eight years that still defy classification by traditional political measures. As with many American presidencies, they were White House years best defined by anomaly and contradiction. Reagan once asked: Are Americans better off today than they were eight years ago? Some are. A few are much better off. Some are worse off. Most have muddled along much the way they were.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1986
President Reagan has made Nicaragua and Angola the measure of American manhood, the test of whether Mikhail S. Gorbachev will negotiate with the United States out of respect or dismiss it as "weak-kneed." And the only way for Americans to pass the test, according to the President, is to feed arms and ammunition to rebels who are fighting the Marxist governments in Managua and Luanda. That is a reckless prescription.
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