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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1992 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Members of the Church of Scientology won a court victory over a longtime foe Friday, clearing the way for a group of Scientologists to attend the Cult Awareness Network's national convention in Los Angeles next week. The ruling in Los Angeles County Superior Court is the latest development in an escalating feud between the two organizations. The battle erupted in mid-1991 and has resulted in dozens of lawsuits.
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NEWS
December 23, 1996 | LAURIE GOODSTEIN, THE WASHINGTON POST
The man whose lawsuit has pushed the Cult Awareness Network into bankruptcy has done an about-face and is no longer moving toward putting the group out of business. He has abruptly dismissed his lawyer, a prominent member of the Church of Scientology, the anti-cult group's nemesis, and hired an attorney who has battled the church in the past. The sudden shift by Jason Scott, 24, has raised the possibility that the Cult Awareness Network will be able to emerge from bankruptcy and resume its work.
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NEWS
September 11, 1988
The Cult Awareness Network regularly receives complaints about Insight Seminars and MSIA. Many of these complaints are identical to those detailed in the series. Others involve pressure on individuals in the workplace or at school to get involved with the Insight Training. Here in Chicago, a number of people have decided, after reading the Los Angeles Times series, not to continue with the Insight training scheduled last week which they had originally enrolled in. Your articles have brought out information about the deceptive and unethical conduct of Roger Hinkins which the public has the right to know about.
NEWS
December 1, 1996 | LAURIE GOODSTEIN, THE WASHINGTON POST
For 20 years, the Cult Awareness Network ran the nation's best-known hotline for parents who grew distraught when unconventional religious groups they neither trusted nor understood suddenly won the allegiance of their children. From its offices here in a Chicago suburb, the network (known as CAN) answered more than 350 telephone inquiries a week, counseled relatives at conferences attended by thousands and gave news interviews.
OPINION
July 25, 1993
In response to "Alamo Blames Woes on Satan in Government Garb," July 13: Clever fellow this Tony Alamo. He manages to make wild accusations of how he is being persecuted and evokes sympathy from the reporter. I read this article at 5:30 a.m. and at 6 a.m. went for a walk. There were strewn about the neighborhood leaflets written by Tony Alamo decrying the "Cult Awareness Network (CAN) and the Anti-Defamation League (ADL)" and "FBI Psychological Units at Quantico" which, according to Alamo, led the destruction of the Branch Davidians in Waco on April 19. Alamo calls for "born again" class action lawsuits to stop the "fables created by the criminally insane Cult Awareness Network (CAN)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1996 | From Religion News Service
Plagued by numerous lawsuits from religious groups and fighting a $1.1-million judgment against it, the Cult Awareness Network has filed for bankruptcy under Chapter 7 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. "How we will operate or if we will continue to operate in the short term, I don't know," said Cynthia Kisser, executive director of the 12-year-old organization, known for its aggressive campaigns against groups it considers to be harmful cults.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1991
A man who called a news conference Monday in Los Angeles on the 13th anniversary of the Jonestown massacre told reporters that he had falsely claimed to be a survivor of the Guyana tragedy in order to raise "hundreds of thousands of dollars" for the Cult Awareness Network in Chicago. Gary Scarff said that network personnel encouraged him to tell untrue stories about surviving the blood bath that claimed 914 lives in order to finance their cult deprogramming work.
NEWS
December 23, 1996 | LAURIE GOODSTEIN, THE WASHINGTON POST
The man whose lawsuit has pushed the Cult Awareness Network into bankruptcy has done an about-face and is no longer moving toward putting the group out of business. He has abruptly dismissed his lawyer, a prominent member of the Church of Scientology, the anti-cult group's nemesis, and hired an attorney who has battled the church in the past. The sudden shift by Jason Scott, 24, has raised the possibility that the Cult Awareness Network will be able to emerge from bankruptcy and resume its work.
NEWS
December 4, 1988
Regarding the "The Cult Wars" (by Bob Sipchen, Nov. 17), I must confess I fear the witch-hunting mentality of groups like the Cult Awareness Network more than I do the new, alternative religions. Keep in mind that throughout history all new religious movements have been feared, labeled "subversive" and often persecuted. The accusations, criticisms and claims made against early Christians in Greco-Roman culture, for example, are startlingly identical to the charges made today against unpopular new movements.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1993 | ALEXANDER COCKBURN, Alexander Cockburn writes for the Nation and other publications.
Rodney King's beating captured the nation's attention for more than a year. The extermination of more than 80 Americans during an armed attack by federal agents outside Waco is already slipping off the front pages. But then, King is a black man whose maltreatment came to symbolize police violence against the poor. The Davidians were "a cult," and thus exempted from justice and compassion. Atty. Gen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1996 | From Religion News Service
Plagued by numerous lawsuits from religious groups and fighting a $1.1-million judgment against it, the Cult Awareness Network has filed for bankruptcy under Chapter 7 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. "How we will operate or if we will continue to operate in the short term, I don't know," said Cynthia Kisser, executive director of the 12-year-old organization, known for its aggressive campaigns against groups it considers to be harmful cults.
OPINION
July 25, 1993
In response to "Alamo Blames Woes on Satan in Government Garb," July 13: Clever fellow this Tony Alamo. He manages to make wild accusations of how he is being persecuted and evokes sympathy from the reporter. I read this article at 5:30 a.m. and at 6 a.m. went for a walk. There were strewn about the neighborhood leaflets written by Tony Alamo decrying the "Cult Awareness Network (CAN) and the Anti-Defamation League (ADL)" and "FBI Psychological Units at Quantico" which, according to Alamo, led the destruction of the Branch Davidians in Waco on April 19. Alamo calls for "born again" class action lawsuits to stop the "fables created by the criminally insane Cult Awareness Network (CAN)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1993 | ALEXANDER COCKBURN, Alexander Cockburn writes for the Nation and other publications.
Rodney King's beating captured the nation's attention for more than a year. The extermination of more than 80 Americans during an armed attack by federal agents outside Waco is already slipping off the front pages. But then, King is a black man whose maltreatment came to symbolize police violence against the poor. The Davidians were "a cult," and thus exempted from justice and compassion. Atty. Gen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1992 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Members of the Church of Scientology won a court victory over a longtime foe Friday, clearing the way for a group of Scientologists to attend the Cult Awareness Network's national convention in Los Angeles next week. The ruling in Los Angeles County Superior Court is the latest development in an escalating feud between the two organizations. The battle erupted in mid-1991 and has resulted in dozens of lawsuits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1991
A man who called a news conference Monday in Los Angeles on the 13th anniversary of the Jonestown massacre told reporters that he had falsely claimed to be a survivor of the Guyana tragedy in order to raise "hundreds of thousands of dollars" for the Cult Awareness Network in Chicago. Gary Scarff said that network personnel encouraged him to tell untrue stories about surviving the blood bath that claimed 914 lives in order to finance their cult deprogramming work.
NEWS
December 4, 1988
Regarding the "The Cult Wars" (by Bob Sipchen, Nov. 17), I must confess I fear the witch-hunting mentality of groups like the Cult Awareness Network more than I do the new, alternative religions. Keep in mind that throughout history all new religious movements have been feared, labeled "subversive" and often persecuted. The accusations, criticisms and claims made against early Christians in Greco-Roman culture, for example, are startlingly identical to the charges made today against unpopular new movements.
NEWS
December 1, 1996 | LAURIE GOODSTEIN, THE WASHINGTON POST
For 20 years, the Cult Awareness Network ran the nation's best-known hotline for parents who grew distraught when unconventional religious groups they neither trusted nor understood suddenly won the allegiance of their children. From its offices here in a Chicago suburb, the network (known as CAN) answered more than 350 telephone inquiries a week, counseled relatives at conferences attended by thousands and gave news interviews.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1986
A Westlake Village man who died three months ago after winning a $1.5-million judgment against a Calabasas-based religious sect was honored Saturday by a national anti-cult group. The man, Gregory Mull, was named the posthumous winner of the Leo J. Ryan Award by the Chicago-based Cult Awareness Network. His daughter, Linda Mull Witt of Thousand Oaks, received the award at a ceremony in Kansas City. The award is named after U.S. Rep. Leo J.
NEWS
September 11, 1988
The Cult Awareness Network regularly receives complaints about Insight Seminars and MSIA. Many of these complaints are identical to those detailed in the series. Others involve pressure on individuals in the workplace or at school to get involved with the Insight Training. Here in Chicago, a number of people have decided, after reading the Los Angeles Times series, not to continue with the Insight training scheduled last week which they had originally enrolled in. Your articles have brought out information about the deceptive and unethical conduct of Roger Hinkins which the public has the right to know about.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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