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Cultural Conflict

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1999 | MARIA ELENA FERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the eldest daughter in her family, it is Maria Sanchez's responsibility to care for her siblings and do the housework while her parents work several jobs to make ends meet. Every day, Maria, 15, juggles those tasks with her schoolwork and her participation in a Costa Mesa after-school program that mentors other girls like her.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
Krista Bremer's cross-cultural journey began on a North Carolina jogging path, where the one-time California surfer girl met a scientist from Libya who romanced her and swept her away. Bremer, one of the authors at this weekend's Los Angeles Times Festival of Books at USC, chronicled that experience in a memoir titled "My Accidental Jihad. " The "accident" refers to an unexpected pregnancy; "jihad" (Arabic for "effort" or "struggle") is her way of describing the "effort" of her marriage and of all marriages in general.
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BOOKS
July 16, 1989 | SONJA BOLLE
The work of a prominent Swiss cultural historian, "Cultures in Conflict" seeks to transform the history of colonialism into cultural history by representing the mental structures or world view of the actors on both sides, explorers and indigenous peoples. Drawing on the voluminous literature on voyages and colonization roughly from the middle of the 16th through the 19th centuries, Urs Bitterli classifies the types of encounters between Europeans and "others."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2012 | By Hector Tobar, Los Angeles Times
Flight Behavior A novel Barbara Kingsolver Harper: 436 pp., $28.99 Strange things are happening in Appalachia. The natural world as we know it is coming to an end, overheated by human greed. "Global warming" is a dangerously loaded expression in the rural, Republican-loving, God-fearing Tennessee of Barbara Kingsolver's didactic and preachy new novel, "Flight Behavior. " The people of the fictional Feathertown have been taught by talk radio that it's a big-city scam concocted by Al Gore.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2012 | By Hector Tobar, Los Angeles Times
Flight Behavior A novel Barbara Kingsolver Harper: 436 pp., $28.99 Strange things are happening in Appalachia. The natural world as we know it is coming to an end, overheated by human greed. "Global warming" is a dangerously loaded expression in the rural, Republican-loving, God-fearing Tennessee of Barbara Kingsolver's didactic and preachy new novel, "Flight Behavior. " The people of the fictional Feathertown have been taught by talk radio that it's a big-city scam concocted by Al Gore.
NEWS
November 19, 1989
In response to "Cultural Conflict" by Itabari Njeri (View, Nov. 8): As a Korean-American, I was furious after reading the article. Not only was it biased, but it also did not cover the heart of the issue: the "conflict" between blacks and Korean-Americans. The story was filled with how badly blacks are treated by "Korean merchants." Korean merchants were portrayed as mean old people who start cussing at blacks the minute they walk into their stores. But I did not see even one sentence on how Koreans are treated by blacks in the black community.
NEWS
December 22, 1996
Re your article "Cultures at the Crossroads" (Dec. 13), I can't believe that this is the second story I've read sympathetic to the men who married 13- and 14-year-old brides, because, after all, it's OK in their culture. In many places in Asia small children are working more than 12 hours a day. Tell me, will we let anyone do the same to their children here? In some places in Africa, genital mutilation of young girls is the cultural norm. Should we find that acceptable too? It's not an issue of cultural conflict at all. It's an issue of human rights and constitutional rights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2001
The cultural conflict as described by Neal Gabler in "A False Peace" (Opinion, April 9) is a "dynamic and continuous process" between the construction of conservative taboos and the transgression by popular culture of those constructed taboos. This symbiotic relationship is necessary for our society's direction. Gabler's analysis itself underscores the absence of any cultural ideals we are to aspire to besides a juvenile response to unthinking reaction. This desert of imagination is the root of the "wars" Gabler finds so important.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
Krista Bremer's cross-cultural journey began on a North Carolina jogging path, where the one-time California surfer girl met a scientist from Libya who romanced her and swept her away. Bremer, one of the authors at this weekend's Los Angeles Times Festival of Books at USC, chronicled that experience in a memoir titled "My Accidental Jihad. " The "accident" refers to an unexpected pregnancy; "jihad" (Arabic for "effort" or "struggle") is her way of describing the "effort" of her marriage and of all marriages in general.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2006 | Reed Johnson, Times Staff Writer
IN Demian Flores Cortes' hometown of Juchitan, in southern Mexico, women hold most of the economic and social power. In his adopted home of Mexico City, machismo still rules. In Juchitan (pronounced hoo-chee-TAHN), the favorite sport is baseball. Here in the nation's capital, it's soccer. In Juchitan, many natives still converse in the indigenous Zapotec tongue and commune with ancient pre-Hispanic gods.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2011 | By Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times
The Obama administration on Thursday unveiled its road map for solar energy development, directing large-scale industrial projects to 285,000 acres of desert land in the western U.S. while opening 20 million acres of the Mojave for new development. The Bureau of Land Management's long-awaited "solar energy zones" are intended to make some of the desert's most sensitive landscapes less desirable for solar prospecting by identifying "sweet spots" that have already passed environmental requirements and therefore promise expedited permitting, U.S. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2006 | Reed Johnson, Times Staff Writer
IN Demian Flores Cortes' hometown of Juchitan, in southern Mexico, women hold most of the economic and social power. In his adopted home of Mexico City, machismo still rules. In Juchitan (pronounced hoo-chee-TAHN), the favorite sport is baseball. Here in the nation's capital, it's soccer. In Juchitan, many natives still converse in the indigenous Zapotec tongue and commune with ancient pre-Hispanic gods.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2005 | Rachel Abramowitz, Times Staff Writer
THERE'S only one thing that Palestinian terrorist Abu Daoud and Israel's former Mossad spy chief Zvi Zamir can agree on: They're both publicly miffed that they weren't consulted beforehand about Steven Spielberg's new film, "Munich."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2001
The cultural conflict as described by Neal Gabler in "A False Peace" (Opinion, April 9) is a "dynamic and continuous process" between the construction of conservative taboos and the transgression by popular culture of those constructed taboos. This symbiotic relationship is necessary for our society's direction. Gabler's analysis itself underscores the absence of any cultural ideals we are to aspire to besides a juvenile response to unthinking reaction. This desert of imagination is the root of the "wars" Gabler finds so important.
NEWS
December 22, 1996
Re your article "Cultures at the Crossroads" (Dec. 13), I can't believe that this is the second story I've read sympathetic to the men who married 13- and 14-year-old brides, because, after all, it's OK in their culture. In many places in Asia small children are working more than 12 hours a day. Tell me, will we let anyone do the same to their children here? In some places in Africa, genital mutilation of young girls is the cultural norm. Should we find that acceptable too? It's not an issue of cultural conflict at all. It's an issue of human rights and constitutional rights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1996 | DARRELL SATZMAN
Community Bridges, a series of workshops sponsored by the Vaughn Family Center to promote dialogue between Latinos and African Americans, will meet again Wednesday. "The overall goal of Community Bridges is to talk about issues that get in the way of Latinos and African Americans working together," said Yoland Trevino, director of the nonprofit center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1996 | DARRELL SATZMAN
Community Bridges, a series of workshops sponsored by the Vaughn Family Center to promote dialogue between Latinos and African Americans, will meet again Wednesday. "The overall goal of Community Bridges is to talk about issues that get in the way of Latinos and African Americans working together," said Yoland Trevino, director of the nonprofit center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1985 | Associated Press
Mexican women who shuttle between their native land and the United States lead "double lives" because of the different role expectations in the two countries, a new study says. The study by University of California, Berkeley, researchers examined the lives of 80 women who migrate annually from Mexico to the United States to work or to accompany husbands doing seasonal work north of the border.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1996 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Jose Luis Valenzuela graduated from school in his hometown of Los Mochis, near Mazatlan, Mexico, he was only 15. Yet he wanted to go to college in Mexico City along with his older brother. He shudders now as he describes how he obtained his parents' consent--he climbed to the roof of their two-story home and threatened to kill himself. It worked.
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