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Cultural Diversity

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NEWS
October 11, 1990
UCLA has received a grant of $100,000 from the Ford Foundation to develop campus projects on cultural diversity. According to campus officials, the money will be used to develop a core lecture course for undergraduates on "American Culture and Aesthetic Values," create eight multicultural courses in specific disciplines, develop an informal lecture series on "Ethnic Los Angeles" to be offered in the residence halls and coordinate the new curricula with existing arts and cultural programs.
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OPINION
November 3, 2013
Re "Ethnic studies falter in new era," Oct. 31 It was interesting to note that several campuses in the California State University system are cutting back their ethnic studies departments due to budget and enrollment problems. Asian studies, African American studies and so on will soon be thrown on the ash heap of academic history. But critics of the cuts are unhappy. Ron Scapp, president of the National Assn. for Ethnic Studies, claims that debate over immigration, the election of the country's first black president and the aftermath of the shooting of Trayvon Martin show that the nation is still grappling with issues of race and cultural diversity.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1996
Lola Montes and her Spanish Dancers, the Lula Washington Dance Theatre, Anthony Shay's AVAZ International Dance Theatre, and Zendeko, Japanese Taiko Drummers will perform at the Beverly Hills Civic Center Plaza at 4 p.m. Sunday as part of "Sundays in the City," a free city-sponsored celebration of cultural diversity.
OPINION
November 27, 2012
Re "Spilling over on Harbor," Nov. 24 Thank you for your fascinating story on Orange County's Harbor Boulevard. I have always been fascinated by another "harbor" boulevard in Orange County that is about as long and wide with almost as much cultural diversity but gets less recognition due to its multiple names. It stretches from Huntington Harbour to Dana Point Harbor and is variously known as Edinger, Irvine Center, Moulton and Golden Lantern. A single unifying name, I always thought, would help its public perception as a unifying countywide thoroughfare like Harbor Boulevard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1996 | JASON TERADA
Cal Lutheran University has scheduled two free lectures focusing on cultural diversity and education for September as part of its "Searching for Common Ground" fall series. The first, "Criss-Crossing Cultures: Enacting the Promise of Plurality," at 10:05 a.m. Monday will be presented in Cal Lutheran's Samuelson Chapel by James Sauceda, an associate professor of speech communication at Cal State Long Beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2011 | By Nicole Santa Cruz, Los Angeles Times
At a Santa Ana City Council meeting in August, Mayor Pro Tem Claudia Alvarez compared a Jewish business developer to Adolf Hitler and talked of ethnic cleansing in the downtown area, where some Latino retailers feel they have been marginalized. The reaction was swift. The Anti-Defamation League called for her resignation. The City Council censured her and sought ways to defuse the racial and religious tensions Alvarez's remark revealed. By the next day, she had apologized, but the fury did not subside.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1991 | ERIC YOUNG
Under a strong sun, the four-day Rainbow Festival began Monday and turned a corner of UC Irvine near the new student center into a collage of food, folk music and dancing from other countries. "We try to highlight different cultures," said Corina Espinoza, director of the campus Cross-Cultural) Center and one of the festival organizers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1995
Dances and foods representing cultures from around the world will fill Conejo Community Park on Sunday when the Thousand Oaks Arts Commission holds its second International Arts Festival. Each of 10 dance troupes will perform twice during the five-hour festival, which begins at noon. Although the troupes represent cultures from South America to Eastern Europe, they are all based in Southern California, said Bonnie Roth, chairwoman of the arts commission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2011 | By Nicole Santa Cruz, Los Angeles Times
At a Santa Ana City Council meeting in August, Mayor Pro Tem Claudia Alvarez compared a Jewish business developer to Adolf Hitler and talked of ethnic cleansing in the downtown area, where some Latino retailers feel they have been marginalized. The reaction was swift. The Anti-Defamation League called for her resignation. The City Council censured her and sought ways to defuse the racial and religious tensions Alvarez's remark revealed. By the next day, she had apologized, but the fury did not subside.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2009 | Jon Thurber
Emory Elliott, a UC Riverside professor and leading scholar of American literature who was a pivotal figure in the university's intellectual community, has died. He was 66. Elliott, who was found Tuesday at his Riverside home, died of an apparent heart attack.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2008 | Tiffany Hsu, Times Staff Writer
When Ken Bascom arrived at Biola College in 1967 to work on his master's degree in history, his fellow students, almost all white, stuck to a strict dress code and had a 10 p.m. curfew on weeknights. Last weekend, a multicultural throng of students, several with dyed hair, piercings or tattoos, celebrated the centennial of the private evangelical school -- a university since 1981 -- at a rock concert that extended into the early morning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2007 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
Determined that their school not be branded as racially intolerant, students and faculty at Newhall's Hart High School dedicated a symbolic "peace pole" Tuesday aimed at affirming their respect for cultural diversity and their commitment to ethnic harmony. The dedication of the 10-foot copper monument comes more than a year after a racially charged clash among students on the north Los Angeles County campus.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2006 | Wesley Yang, Special to The Times
WALTER Benn Michaels has written one of the least equivocal books in recent memory. "Almost everything we say about culture," he begins in his introduction, "seems to me mistaken, and this book tries to show why." He lists a few of these mistaken ideas: "That the significant differences between us are cultural, that such differences should be respected, that there's a value in making sure that different cultures survive." And that's just laying the groundwork for his real intent.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
A 1977 Francois Truffaut interview and the original manuscript of Victor Hugo's "Les Miserables" are among items France has put online, aiding President Jacques Chirac's goal to blunt the "Anglo-Saxon" dominance of the Web. About 100,000 television and radio broadcasts were posted online recently by the state-owned French National Audiovisual Institute as it opened a digitized catalog.
OPINION
October 24, 2005
A UNITED NATIONS AGENCY smacked Hollywood last week with a rolled-up parchment, adopting a "cultural diversity" convention that says countries may subsidize or shelter their local creative industries. To the U.S. government -- joined only by Israel in voting against the document -- the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization's convention was thinly veiled protectionism.
BUSINESS
October 22, 2005 | Richard Verrier, Times Staff Writer
For Hollywood, the decision this week by delegates to a key United Nations agency to back a treaty to promote cultural diversity is reading like the script to a bad sequel. On Friday, the Motion Picture Assn. of America trade group warned in a statement that the U.N. Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization accord was protectionism in disguise, the latest attempt by some countries to enact barriers that could allow them to restrict the importing of American movies and music.
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