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TRAVEL
December 11, 2005 | Jane Engle, Times Staff Writer
IN Switzerland, the land of watches, trains really do run like clockwork. "If I'm 30 seconds late, the train is gone," said Michelle Kranz, who commutes daily into Lucerne, where she works for the tourist board. Step across the border, and you're in a different universe. Italy has two rail schedules: the one printed in the brochure and another, flashing updates, on a board in the station. The first may be a fantasy; the second, reality.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
"Number fourteen, home " is an elaborate video requiem for the dead -- specifically for the great Romantic composer Frédéric Chopin but, by implication, for the entire network of cultural relations that made his work possible. Dutch artist and composer Guido van der Werve enacts a metaphoric lament for an era that has passed into history. At Marc Foxx Gallery, the 54-minute video screens every hour on the hour. In three movements and 12 acts, the artist performs a trans-European triathlon of swimming, bicycling and running from Warsaw, where Chopin grew up, to Paris,  where he died of respiratory disease at 39. Chopin was buried at Père Lachaise cemetery, but legend has it that his heart was smuggled out of France and interred at Warsaw's Holy Cross Church.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1999
In an otherwise very readable "A Cultural Diamond in the Rough" (Aug. 2), Hector Tobar paints San Antonio as polarized racially and by class (based on race), missing out on the city's complexity. In fact, San Antonio appears as a model, not perfect but worthy of emulation, of race relations and cross-cultural integration to observant visitors; Anglos and Mexican Americans unconsciously hang around together, attending concerts and plays, playing sports. Intermarriage is commonplace, as reflected in the society page of the city's major daily.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2010 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
When legendary Cuban group Los Van Van played Miami in October 1999, about 3,000 angry anti-Castro Cuban American exiles pelted fans with eggs, soda cans and rocks. In 2001, the Latin Grammy Awards did a last-minute shift from Miami to Los Angeles to avoid any similar uproar over Cuban nominees like Los Van Van, who've been supportive of Fidel Castro's communist government. The scene is likely to be far more tranquil when Los Van Van appear Thursday and Friday evening at the Conga Room in downtown L.A. ?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1989 | ROBERT HILBURN
Rap music is not polite. It's a noisy 'n' crude attack on mainstream sensibilities that has even liberal-minded adults who were raised on the rebellious, outlaw beat of Little Richard and the Rolling Stones asking themselves, "What happened to real music?"
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
"Number fourteen, home " is an elaborate video requiem for the dead -- specifically for the great Romantic composer Frédéric Chopin but, by implication, for the entire network of cultural relations that made his work possible. Dutch artist and composer Guido van der Werve enacts a metaphoric lament for an era that has passed into history. At Marc Foxx Gallery, the 54-minute video screens every hour on the hour. In three movements and 12 acts, the artist performs a trans-European triathlon of swimming, bicycling and running from Warsaw, where Chopin grew up, to Paris,  where he died of respiratory disease at 39. Chopin was buried at Père Lachaise cemetery, but legend has it that his heart was smuggled out of France and interred at Warsaw's Holy Cross Church.
NEWS
January 11, 1990 | ITABARI NJERI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Michael Yoon, owner of the L. A. Slauson Swapmeet, saw members of the African-American community picketing his store and calling for a boycott of Korean-American merchants recently, his heart sank. The pain was not because of lost sales. The hurt came from the realization that his good intentions and personal efforts to establish positive relations with the community were not enough.
NEWS
November 16, 1992 | From Associated Press
A Russian rocket carrying a payload of religious icons, appeals for world peace and a stuffed toy dog took dreams of better business into orbit early today. The three-stage Soyuz rocket blasted off from the once-secret Plesetsk space center near the northern Russian port of Archangel. Mounted on the rocket is the Resurs 500 satellite and descent module, which will orbit Earth for about five days before splashing down in international waters about 200 miles off the coast of Washington state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1992 | ANNA CEKOLA and LEN HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Shayla Mitchell is black. Her ethnic heritage is an international mix of Panamanian, Jamaican and African-American cultures, something her friends at Trabuco Hills High School learned only recently. An increased awareness among students of their peers' ethnic background has been one of the benefits of two new multicultural groups emerging at El Toro and Trabuco Hills high schools in the Saddleback Valley.
NEWS
February 10, 1998 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With prayers in Hebrew and the affixing of a glass mezuza to the door frame, the American Jewish Committee on Monday inaugurated a center here--sponsored by Lawrence and Lee Ramer of Los Angeles--dedicated to improving relations between Germans and American Jews. The Lawrence and Lee Ramer Center for German-Jewish Relations is the American Jewish Committee's first permanent facility in Europe.
TRAVEL
December 11, 2005 | Jane Engle, Times Staff Writer
IN Switzerland, the land of watches, trains really do run like clockwork. "If I'm 30 seconds late, the train is gone," said Michelle Kranz, who commutes daily into Lucerne, where she works for the tourist board. Step across the border, and you're in a different universe. Italy has two rail schedules: the one printed in the brochure and another, flashing updates, on a board in the station. The first may be a fantasy; the second, reality.
NEWS
April 14, 2005 | Valli Herman, Times Staff Writer
It wasn't so long ago that aromatherapy was associated with extreme New Age practitioners, and "massage" conjured thoughts of illicit activity and visits from the vice squad. Today, aromatherapy, massage and a host of formerly esoteric body and skin care practices are so mainstream, it's hard to remember their beginnings.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2001 | GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the eve of 2001, Calendar brought together three pairs of high-profile creators and administrators from disparate parts of the entertainment and arts world to candidly discuss issues of the day. In this first installment, "Law & Order" creator Dick Wolf sat down with Grammy-winning record producer Rick Rubin to reflect on a year's worth of controversy over content that stretched from Hollywood to Capitol Hill. Are artists' rights in danger?
NEWS
June 27, 2000 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
Robert D. Putnam has a cure for what ails American society--three cures, actually: new rules to let working parents spend more time with their families; more extracurricular activities at school; and more groups, from Rotary Clubs to amateur brass bands, to get folks out from behind their computer screens. Putnam, a Harvard political scientist, believes he has identified a central crisis of our time--the decline of group activity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2000 | SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The wars may be fought a world away, but UC Irvine-based peace activists hope that studying conflicts in such places as Kosovo could provide keys to maintaining peace elsewhere, including Southern California neighborhoods. More than a dozen activists from around the world gather today at UCI for a four-day conference on "The Role of Citizen Peacebuilding in Conflict Transformation," which aims to explore the roots of violence and war.
BUSINESS
December 20, 1999 | ANNETTE HADDAD and SCOTT DOGGETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The challenges of globalization go far beyond the economic and political. Doing business in the international marketplace inevitably means dealing with people from another culture. Advancing technology has made doing business in Bangkok as easy as it is in Boston, perhaps lulling us into thinking that few differences exist anymore. But cultural nuances still color behavior.
NEWS
June 28, 1996 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In her steamy native Georgia, this American woman's short-sleeved top would have been considered only sensible. On the streets of Dhahran, revealing her elbows was enough to provoke a scolding from one of the officially sanctioned religious policemen who watch for breaches of Saudi tradition. " 'You should cover your arms!' he told me. 'Does your husband know you are about like this?' " recalled the woman, the wife of an American businessman. "I thought: 'I'll never adjust to this place.'
NEWS
April 14, 2005 | Valli Herman, Times Staff Writer
It wasn't so long ago that aromatherapy was associated with extreme New Age practitioners, and "massage" conjured thoughts of illicit activity and visits from the vice squad. Today, aromatherapy, massage and a host of formerly esoteric body and skin care practices are so mainstream, it's hard to remember their beginnings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1999
In an otherwise very readable "A Cultural Diamond in the Rough" (Aug. 2), Hector Tobar paints San Antonio as polarized racially and by class (based on race), missing out on the city's complexity. In fact, San Antonio appears as a model, not perfect but worthy of emulation, of race relations and cross-cultural integration to observant visitors; Anglos and Mexican Americans unconsciously hang around together, attending concerts and plays, playing sports. Intermarriage is commonplace, as reflected in the society page of the city's major daily.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1999 | HOLLY J. WOLCOTT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Immigration agents in Southern California will undergo more cultural sensitivity training, the Immigration and Naturalization Service announced Thursday, after a Camarillo raid in which an agent made derogatory remarks to a Latino and a Jew. The refresher courses, which will be based on courses already taught at the agency's academy, will be mandatory for all 300 agents working at the INS offices in Los Angeles, Ventura, Orange and Riverside counties.
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