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TRAVEL
December 11, 2005 | Jane Engle, Times Staff Writer
IN Switzerland, the land of watches, trains really do run like clockwork. "If I'm 30 seconds late, the train is gone," said Michelle Kranz, who commutes daily into Lucerne, where she works for the tourist board. Step across the border, and you're in a different universe. Italy has two rail schedules: the one printed in the brochure and another, flashing updates, on a board in the station. The first may be a fantasy; the second, reality.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
"Number fourteen, home " is an elaborate video requiem for the dead -- specifically for the great Romantic composer Frédéric Chopin but, by implication, for the entire network of cultural relations that made his work possible. Dutch artist and composer Guido van der Werve enacts a metaphoric lament for an era that has passed into history. At Marc Foxx Gallery, the 54-minute video screens every hour on the hour. In three movements and 12 acts, the artist performs a trans-European triathlon of swimming, bicycling and running from Warsaw, where Chopin grew up, to Paris,  where he died of respiratory disease at 39. Chopin was buried at Père Lachaise cemetery, but legend has it that his heart was smuggled out of France and interred at Warsaw's Holy Cross Church.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1999
In an otherwise very readable "A Cultural Diamond in the Rough" (Aug. 2), Hector Tobar paints San Antonio as polarized racially and by class (based on race), missing out on the city's complexity. In fact, San Antonio appears as a model, not perfect but worthy of emulation, of race relations and cross-cultural integration to observant visitors; Anglos and Mexican Americans unconsciously hang around together, attending concerts and plays, playing sports. Intermarriage is commonplace, as reflected in the society page of the city's major daily.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2010 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
When legendary Cuban group Los Van Van played Miami in October 1999, about 3,000 angry anti-Castro Cuban American exiles pelted fans with eggs, soda cans and rocks. In 2001, the Latin Grammy Awards did a last-minute shift from Miami to Los Angeles to avoid any similar uproar over Cuban nominees like Los Van Van, who've been supportive of Fidel Castro's communist government. The scene is likely to be far more tranquil when Los Van Van appear Thursday and Friday evening at the Conga Room in downtown L.A. ?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
"Number fourteen, home " is an elaborate video requiem for the dead -- specifically for the great Romantic composer Frédéric Chopin but, by implication, for the entire network of cultural relations that made his work possible. Dutch artist and composer Guido van der Werve enacts a metaphoric lament for an era that has passed into history. At Marc Foxx Gallery, the 54-minute video screens every hour on the hour. In three movements and 12 acts, the artist performs a trans-European triathlon of swimming, bicycling and running from Warsaw, where Chopin grew up, to Paris,  where he died of respiratory disease at 39. Chopin was buried at Père Lachaise cemetery, but legend has it that his heart was smuggled out of France and interred at Warsaw's Holy Cross Church.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1989 | ROBERT HILBURN
Rap music is not polite. It's a noisy 'n' crude attack on mainstream sensibilities that has even liberal-minded adults who were raised on the rebellious, outlaw beat of Little Richard and the Rolling Stones asking themselves, "What happened to real music?"
NEWS
January 11, 1990 | ITABARI NJERI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Michael Yoon, owner of the L. A. Slauson Swapmeet, saw members of the African-American community picketing his store and calling for a boycott of Korean-American merchants recently, his heart sank. The pain was not because of lost sales. The hurt came from the realization that his good intentions and personal efforts to establish positive relations with the community were not enough.
NEWS
November 16, 1992 | From Associated Press
A Russian rocket carrying a payload of religious icons, appeals for world peace and a stuffed toy dog took dreams of better business into orbit early today. The three-stage Soyuz rocket blasted off from the once-secret Plesetsk space center near the northern Russian port of Archangel. Mounted on the rocket is the Resurs 500 satellite and descent module, which will orbit Earth for about five days before splashing down in international waters about 200 miles off the coast of Washington state.
NEWS
September 21, 1995 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Ezer Weizman blames the three Ms: Madonna, Michael Jackson and McDonald's. When thousands of young Israelis stampeded the gate at a rock concert in the southern town of Arad this summer, killing two people and injuring 150, the president deemed it horrible proof of Israel's Americanization. "It should teach us to stop importing poor culture," Weizman said, "to seek a genuine Israeli culture and a return to tradition."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1992 | ANNA CEKOLA and LEN HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Shayla Mitchell is black. Her ethnic heritage is an international mix of Panamanian, Jamaican and African-American cultures, something her friends at Trabuco Hills High School learned only recently. An increased awareness among students of their peers' ethnic background has been one of the benefits of two new multicultural groups emerging at El Toro and Trabuco Hills high schools in the Saddleback Valley.
TRAVEL
December 11, 2005 | Jane Engle, Times Staff Writer
IN Switzerland, the land of watches, trains really do run like clockwork. "If I'm 30 seconds late, the train is gone," said Michelle Kranz, who commutes daily into Lucerne, where she works for the tourist board. Step across the border, and you're in a different universe. Italy has two rail schedules: the one printed in the brochure and another, flashing updates, on a board in the station. The first may be a fantasy; the second, reality.
HEALTH
September 12, 2005 | Delthia Ricks, Newsday
While doctors acknowledge that communicating clearly with patients is a key factor in clinical decision-making, many resident physicians report being unprepared to adequately communicate with people who are culturally different from themselves. Residents -- up-and-coming doctors who treat tens of thousands of patients in the nation's teaching hospitals -- say they are not being adequately trained to cope with the increasingly diverse populations requiring medical treatment.
WORLD
September 11, 2005 | Alissa J. Rubin, Times Staff Writer
Hassan Lami was herding some sheep to a garbage-strewn city lot to graze when six masked men, using guns with silencers, shot him more than 30 times. As far as anyone can determine, the just-married 20-year-old was killed that July morning because he was a Shiite Muslim. One week later, another 20-year-old was gunned down, this time by men who didn't bother to wear masks.
NEWS
April 14, 2005 | Valli Herman, Times Staff Writer
It wasn't so long ago that aromatherapy was associated with extreme New Age practitioners, and "massage" conjured thoughts of illicit activity and visits from the vice squad. Today, aromatherapy, massage and a host of formerly esoteric body and skin care practices are so mainstream, it's hard to remember their beginnings.
WORLD
December 11, 2004 | Sebastian Rotella, Times Staff Writer
As a crack interpreter for anti-terrorism investigators, "Wadad" fights the war of the words. She deciphers North African dialects, Middle Eastern accents and the French Arabic slang of jail yards and housing projects. She braves the crossfire during marathon interrogations of suspected terrorists who snarl at the presence of a female interpreter or recite Koranic verses.
TRAVEL
February 1, 2004 | Susan Spano, Times Staff Writer
In Japan it's rude to remove splinters from your wooden chopsticks by rubbing them together. In Belgium, air kisses, a common greeting, come in threes, so you shouldn't turn away before the last is bestowed. And imagine the trouble you could get into in Bulgaria, where nodding your head up and down means no. The small gaffes travelers make often pass unnoticed -- or uncommented upon -- because people everywhere are increasingly aware of the strange habits of foreigners.
NEWS
February 10, 1998 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With prayers in Hebrew and the affixing of a glass mezuza to the door frame, the American Jewish Committee on Monday inaugurated a center here--sponsored by Lawrence and Lee Ramer of Los Angeles--dedicated to improving relations between Germans and American Jews. The Lawrence and Lee Ramer Center for German-Jewish Relations is the American Jewish Committee's first permanent facility in Europe.
NEWS
June 28, 1996 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In her steamy native Georgia, this American woman's short-sleeved top would have been considered only sensible. On the streets of Dhahran, revealing her elbows was enough to provoke a scolding from one of the officially sanctioned religious policemen who watch for breaches of Saudi tradition. " 'You should cover your arms!' he told me. 'Does your husband know you are about like this?' " recalled the woman, the wife of an American businessman. "I thought: 'I'll never adjust to this place.'
WORLD
November 25, 2002 | Alissa J. Rubin, Times Staff Writer
At first glance, few places on Earth seem like better candidates for a museum of tolerance than Israel, where Jews and Palestinians kill one another almost daily and mutual hatreds seem rooted in the stony soil. The Israeli-Palestinian dispute is just one of the fault lines: secular Jews versus religious Jews, Israeli Arabs versus Israeli Jews.
WORLD
September 22, 2002 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When northern Germans answer the telephone or encounter a friend on the street, they say a simple guten tag--good day. But in the south, the salutation is gruess gott--greet God--an expression so common it no longer really alludes to religious worship but still puts off those unused to a custom dating to the Crusades.
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