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ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2013 | By Robert Hilburn
Johnny Cash's life in the 1960s is mostly remembered as a time of glorious achievement - from the landmark prison albums at Folsom and San Quentin to the launch of the ABC-TV series featuring such guests as Bob Dylan and the Doors that led to his becoming a giant figure in popular culture, a symbol to millions, no less, of the best of American social values. But Cash also experienced excruciatingly dark times in the decade, fueled by drugs and guilt over the breakup of his marriage.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik
NEW YORK -- “The Lego Movie” this winter reawakened many people to the colorful plastic bricks they hadn't thought about since childhood. But a raft of people inside and outside the Danish company have been clued in to its pleasures for years, as a new movie gleefully and sometimes astonishingly documents. The film, "Beyond the Brick," which premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival several days ago, is a playful if decidedly soft-lensed look at all things Lego. Directed by Daniel Junge and Kief Davidson and narrated by Jason Bateman, “Brick” looks at the subculture of Lego - or perhaps, given how dominant it appears to have become, the culture of Lego.
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BUSINESS
December 28, 2013 | By E. Scott Reckard
A Times investigation into the intense sales culture at Wells Fargo Bank, published in Sunday's newspaper, has drawn strong reaction from the bank's customers and employees. Many related experiences similar to those described in the story. The Times reported that rigid daily quotas caused many employees to unethically inflate sales - often by pushing unnecessary accounts or services, at times without customer permission. Some staffers begged family members to open ghost accounts; others ordered credit cards that customers never requested, or forged signatures on account paperwork.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | Ann Friedman
With every click, every tweet, every share, am I being exploited or am I taking advantage of the digital revolution? This is the question I kept asking myself as I read Astra Taylor's "The People's Platform: Taking Back Power and Culture in the Digital Age. " Taylor makes a thorough case that the technological advances we've been told constitute progress - that anyone can start a blog, that we can easily keep up with our friends (and frenemies)...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2013 | By Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - At 855 pages, it has been lauded by linguists and anthropologists as the only dictionary of its kind: a comprehensive translation of Iu-Mien into English that doubles as a guide to the dying practices of a people who, beginning in 1975, fled the hills of Laos after aiding the CIA's secret war. Over the quarter-century it took to produce, much came to pass. For the Pasadena professor whose name graces the book's charcoal cover, there was the murder of a daughter, a house fire that consumed his nearly finished work and the gentle assistance of collaborators on three continents who helped him pick up the pieces.
NEWS
May 30, 2013 | By Lisa Wade
In his Op-Ed article this week on hookup culture in college, Bob Laird links binge drinking and casual sex to sexually transmitted diseases, unwanted pregnancies, confusion, low self-esteem, unhappiness, vomiting, ethical retardation, low grades and emotional inadequacy. "How nice of The Times to include this leftover piece from 1957 today," snarked a reader in the online comments.  Fair enough, but Laird is more than out of touch. He also fundamentally misunderstands hookup culture, the relationships that form within it and the real source of the problems arising from some sexual relationships.
NEWS
January 14, 2013 | By Anne Harnagel
The Caravelle Hotel in Ho Chi Minh City , Vietnam , is celebrating the city's cultural heritage with a package that includes a performance at the neighboring Saigon Opera House. The four-day, three-night "Opera Nights" package installs guests in the hotel's Opera Suite, overlooking Lam Son Square and the opera house, where guests will attend a performance of "Hon Viet” ("Soul of Vietnam”). Before the program, guests will have dinner in the hotel's fine-dining restaurant, Reflections.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
Karaoke Culture Dubravka Ugresic Open Letter: 324 pp., $15.95 paper Dubravka Ugresic does not like karaoke. That doesn't stop her from trying it, just as her resistance to celebrity doesn't stop her from putting her head through a cutout on a Hollywood studio tour so that she can be photographed with Clark Gable. Ugresic, a game and inquisitive critic, looks at culture from all angles, which sometimes means picking up the mic . Karaoke recycles rather than creates, she argues in "Karaoke Culture," the 100-page essay that lends its name to the title of her new collection.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2013 | By David Ng
Here's a proposal that would have a hard time finding support in the United States. A new government study in France suggests levying a new tax as high as 1% on the sale of smartphones, tablets and other Internet devices, with the funds going toward funding cultural initiatives. The proposal was submitted Monday to President Francois Hollande as part of a larger report on digital culture. The report was created by a team led by Pierre Lescure, a journalist and former executive at Canal Plus.   The focus of the report is the so-called French cultural exception in the changing digital landscape.
TRAVEL
December 11, 2005 | Jane Engle, Times Staff Writer
IN Switzerland, the land of watches, trains really do run like clockwork. "If I'm 30 seconds late, the train is gone," said Michelle Kranz, who commutes daily into Lucerne, where she works for the tourist board. Step across the border, and you're in a different universe. Italy has two rail schedules: the one printed in the brochure and another, flashing updates, on a board in the station. The first may be a fantasy; the second, reality.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2014 | By Mike Boehm
Los Angeles officials are starting to get serious about freeing up $7.5 million or more in city government funds that are earmarked for visual art, performances or other cultural events, but have been wrapped tightly for years in legal red tape. The unspent funds were rendered all but useless in 2007 when then-City Attorney Rocky Delgadillo ruled that the fees developers are required to pay to fund public art had to be spent within a one-block radius of the construction project that generated the fees.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2014 | By Margaret Gray
According to Jared Diamond, the Pulitzer Prize-winning writer ("The World Until Yesterday," "Collapse," "Guns, Germs, and Steel") who spoke to Patt Morrison about his work Sunday, Americans shouldn't waste time worrying about statistically rare crises like terrorism or plane crashes. "I've already done the most dangerous thing I'm going to do all day -- taken a shower," he said at the Festival of Books in his strong New England accent. Lest people conclude that he was irrationally obsessive, Diamond laid out the statistics: "I'm 76 years old. Life expectancy for a man is 91 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
Krista Bremer's cross-cultural journey began on a North Carolina jogging path, where the one-time California surfer girl met a scientist from Libya who romanced her and swept her away. Bremer, one of the authors at this weekend's Los Angeles Times Festival of Books at USC, chronicled that experience in a memoir titled "My Accidental Jihad. " The "accident" refers to an unexpected pregnancy; "jihad" (Arabic for "effort" or "struggle") is her way of describing the "effort" of her marriage and of all marriages in general.
OPINION
April 9, 2014 | Meghan Daum
In a final passing of the torch to a new generation of late-night talk show hosts, David Letterman announced last week that he would retire in 2015. As intelligent and unique a force as he's always been, the timing seems right. Since beginning his late-night career more than 30 years ago, Letterman has evolved from exuberant, smart-alecky nerd to crotchety, occasionally befuddled elder statesman. Watching him now, it's hard to believe he was once considered the epitome of edginess, a darling of the college crowd and hero to sarcastic eggheads everywhere.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
Roberto Gil de Montes is truly a citizen of the world. The 62-year-old artist -- whose first solo show in nearly 10 years opens at Bergamot Station's Lora Schlesinger Gallery on Saturday -- was born in Guadalajara, Mexico, and as a teenager, his family lived in East Los Angeles. He's spent the last nine years living in the small beach town of Nayarit and in Echo Park, where he still keeps a home, while also traveling extensively throughout India and Europe for inspiration, he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Robert Abele
With a title like "Hot Guys With Guns," actor turned writer-director Doug Spearman's niche comedy-mystery aimed at pop culture-savvy gays makes plain its intentions - titillation, tension and titters - and for the undiscerning, it's likely to deliver. After a chicly designed credit sequence that appealingly spoofs James Bond openings, we settle on caustically friendly exes Danny (a likable Marc Anthony Samuel), a sweet-faced out-of-work actor taking private eye classes, and Patrick/Pip (Brian McArdle)
SPORTS
September 8, 2013 | By Helene Elliott
Kings General Manager Dean Lombardi told fans at the team's fan fest event he believes the franchise is “at a critical stage” but has a unique opportunity to “create something special” despite the challenge of operating under a salary cap that dropped to $64.3 million from a pro-rated $70.2 million last season. Lombardi began his “Town Hall” session at Staples Center by joking that it seemed like it had been a long time since he last spoke to fans - and it was. The fan fest was cancelled last season because of the lockout, making this his first appearance in front of fans since the team's 2012 Stanley Cup triumph.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2012 | By David Ng
The long tentacles of  Rupert Murdoch'sNews Corp. scandal have ensared many ofBritain's top media figures. The unfolding controversy has now embroiledBritain's culture secretary Jeremy Hunt in what is turning out to be a fight for his political life. This week, Hunt was in damage control mode as he faces allegations about his connections to News Corp. 's takeover bid for BSkyB, the British satellite broadcaster. Hunt -- whose department oversees the arts, media, cultural heritage, sports, the Olympics and more -- is accused of being partial to News Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2014 | By Matt Stevens
A "culture of apathy and indifference" among game-day staffers at Dodger Stadium was among the problems identified by Major League Baseball in an assessment of the 2011 beating of Giants fan Bryan Stow. In a motion filed in Los Angeles Superior Court last week, attorneys for Bryan Stow asked to reopen discovery and depose the author of the MLB report, "Dodger Stadium Assessment. " Attorneys said the report "addresses points which are vital" to their case. Stow was attacked in the Dodger Stadium parking lot on opening day, March 31, 2011, and suffered brain injuries.
NEWS
April 3, 2014 | By Jay Jones
Visitors will be able to immerse themselves in Canada's First Nations culture when a first-of-its-kind hotel opens next month in Vancouver. Skwachays Lodge is billing itself as an “entirely aboriginal-themed hotel.” The 18-room boutique hotel in British Columbia will sit at the crossroads of Chinatown and Gastown in downtown Vancouver. The building opened two years ago as a residential facility operated by the Vancouver Native Housing Society . Two floors are being converted into an experiential hotel whose profits will benefit the nonprofit organization.
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