Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCulture Monster
IN THE NEWS

Culture Monster

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2009 | Suzanne Muchnic
A striking nighttime image of two leopards, one snarling in profile, the other looking warily over its shoulder, appears on posters all over Paris announcing "anima," an exhibition of photographs by Jean-Francois Spricigo. On view at the Palais de l'Institut de France through Nov. 21 and coming to Louis Stern Fine Arts in Los Angeles in January, the show introduces a body of work produced by the young Belgian artist who won the 2008 Prix de Photographie de l'Academie des Beaux-Arts.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2014 | By Karen Wada
Elizabeth LeCompte was walking past a New York gallery window when sculptures by Dutch artist Folkert de Jong caught her eye. "They were so ugly and scary and beautiful at the same time," recalls the director of the Wooster Group. "It was what I always want for my work to be. " LeCompte invited De Jong to create pieces for her experimental troupe. His costumes, set elements and props will be seen in "CRY, TROJANS! (Troilus & Cressida)," a retelling of Shakespeare's Trojan War saga, which begins its world-premiere run Feb. 27 at REDCAT.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
How has Sarah Horn's life changed since she was randomly plucked from the audience at the Hollywood Bowl last Friday and brought onstage to sing an impromptu duet with her idol, Kristin Chenoweth?  For one, type “Sarah” into YouTube's search box and the (until recently) completely unknown vocal instructor from Riverside is the second name, Web-wide, that pops up (after Sarah McLachlan, before Sarah Silverman!). The now-viral video of Horn and Chenoweth performing the song “For Good” from the musical “Wicked” has racked up more than 2 million views on YouTube so far. TIMELINE: Summer's must see concerts Onstage at the Bowl, Horn more than held her own beside Chenoweth, belting out the song with stage presence, vocal depth and polish.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
So that's what the Wallis sounds like. It's been more than two months since Beverly Hills opened its swank Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts. But until Wednesday night the multipurpose Bram Goldsmith Theater in the transformed historic post office building had yet to be purposed for unamplified music (with the exception of a few minutes of a tony gala). The St. Lawrence String Quartet did the honors by inaugurating the Wallis' classical music series. A hall with many uses - music of all sorts, theater, dance, opera and children's shows - can be an acoustician's riskiest assignment.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2012 | By Deborah Vankin
Culture Monster headed to Maria Bamford's Eagle Rock kitchen on a recent Saturday evening. It was a relatively intimate affair: just Bamford and her parents, Joel and Marilyn Bamford, who live in Duluth, Minn., Bamford's two pugs and us.  Oh and about a dozen production crew members mulling about. Why? Bamford was shooting her first direct-to-fan comedy special, which she will release on Nov. 28 through Chill.com , an L.A.-based social video site. With the hour-long “Maria Bamford: The special special special!
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
We here at Culture Monster - all right, one of us here at Culture Monster - was a stamp collector as a kid. So the news that the Smithsonian's National Postal Museum will be opening what it calls “the world's largest stamp gallery” on Sept. 22 was especially welcome.  The William H. Gross Stamp Gallery - named after its No. 1 benefactor -- will feature stamps as well as historically significant mail in the context of American history and culture, the museum said. FULL COVERAGE: 2013 Spring arts preview Highlights of the collection include stamps of Hawaiian kings, before Hawaii was officially a state; an 1868 1-cent Z-grill stamp - one of two in existence; and a letter to John Hancock postmarked July 4, 1776.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2013 | By Kelly Scott
Hearing the news of the death of actor James Gandolfini, Culture Monster checked in with Center Theatre Group artistic director Michael Ritchie, whom he worked with before and after "The Sopranos. " Gandolfini starred in Yasmina Reza's play "God of Carnage" on Broadway with Jeff Daniels, Hope Davis and Marcia Gay Harden. The play was a major hit on Broadway, and all four actors were nominated for best actor Tony awards. After the four left the cast (the play briefly closed, but then continued on Broadway with different actors)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Yuja Wang is a wonder. Having proved a sensation as soloist with the Los Angeles Philharmonic at both Walt Disney Concert Hall and the Hollywood Bowl, the 26-year-old Chinese pianist finally made her recital debut at Disney on Sunday night. Again a sensation, she displayed degrees of speed, agility and strength that may have been in violation of gravity's laws. Nor did Wang shy from her notable high style. She wore nearly identical tube-tight dresses - black for Scriabin, bright red for Rachmaninoff - as though a Bond girl who was also Houdini and Horowitz rolled into one, in her demonstration of startling dexterity despite physical restraints.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2013 | By Sherry Stern
Tuesday is a big day for Broadway with the Tony nominations set for a live webcast starting at 5:30 a.m. PDT. The nominations will be announced on TonyAwards.com by multiple Tony winner Sutton Foster (most recently for "Anything Goes") and "Modern Family" actor Jesse Tyler Ferguson (who starred in the Hollywood Bowl production of "The Producers" last summer). PHOTOS: Hollywood stars on stage The American Theatre Wing will nominate plays and musicals in 26 categories for productions that opened during the 2012-2013 Broadway season.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2013 | By Jori Finkel
Despite the recent offer from the Los Angeles County Museum of Art to acquire the cash-strapped Museum of Contemporary Art, the contemporary museum's board of trustees says that its members agree that "the best future for MOCA would be as an independent institution. " MOCA leaders had declined any comment since the offer became public this month. But the board met Friday and a museum spokesperson issued the following statement Tuesday: “The Board is in agreement that the best future for MOCA would be as an independent institution.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
NEW YORK - This has been the season of the concert hall. The one named after Walt Disney turned 10. How that venue has revolutionized musical life in L.A. and beyond has been the subject of much consideration. Though the economy bubbles and bursts, this great space, having lost none of its contemporary luster, continues to inspire an international concert hall building boom. That makes this latest push to get music the heck out of Disney and every other concert hall all the more a remarkable phenomenon in 2013.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Much that was old was new again in 2013, which turned out to be a very good year for the classics. It wasn't a bad year for new work either, even if too many of today's most provocative playwrights are getting short shrift from this town's nonprofit heavyweights. I was especially glad to see Samuel D. Hunter's "The Whale" at South Coast Repertory, but to catch "The Flick," the latest from Annie Baker (for my money, the most exciting American dramatist working today), I had to hop a flight to New York, where Playwrights Horizons was presenting the world premiere.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2013 | By Michael Miller
As records pressed in 1969 go, it's an obscure one - far from "Abbey Road" or "Let It Bleed. " But however many copies remain of it, two found their way recently into a quiet room in UC Irvine's music department. With one of the discs on the turntable, the needle touched down and crackled before a soaring baritone rang from the speakers. Seconds later, a full chorus joined, its harmonies vivid beneath the surface gravel. With the record sleeves spread out in front of them, James Dunning and Rita Major listened closely and sometimes smiled and nodded in recognition.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
NEW YORK - Tea time at Sardi's, and in rushed Bette Midler too busy to give her caricature on the far wall an admiring glance. She had just finished taping an appearance on Katie Couric's talk show and, like me, had plans to see Mike Nichols' starry production of "Betrayal" later that evening. (Unlike me, her companion was Glenn Close.) In short, it was a typical run, run, run New York day. For the moment, however, Midler's attention was focused on "a creature of Beverly Hills," the late Hollywood super-agent Sue Mengers.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
"Judas Maccabaeus" is the Hanukkah "Messiah. " Or it would be if choral groups had an equal-oratorio policy with Handel. Such a policy, in addition, would give us regular airings of another 23 Handel oratorios, all late works (the composer turned to oratorio when the opera business in London went bust) and all of exceptional quality. This year, though, the Pacific Symphony and Chorale, conducted by John Alexander, are offering a major "Judas Maccabaeus" on Sunday, the fourth day of the eight-day holiday that celebrates the victorious Maccabean revolt by 2nd century Judean Jews against the Seleucid Empire.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2013 | By Richard S. Ginell
As if to underscore the classic status of Britten's "War Requiem," a swarm of new and old recordings of the piece has been released this fall. Coming this week will be a new recording led by Antonio Pappano, with a glittering trio of soloists (Anna Netrebko, Ian Bostridge and Thomas Hampson) on Warner Classics. That's not close to all. - From the Czech Radio archives comes a live 1966 performance led by Karel Ancerl two years before the Soviets marched into Prague (Supraphon). Despite the mediocre sound and some flaws (the boys' chorus comes in four bars early in the Offertorium, nearly causing a train wreck)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2012 | By Jori Finkel
Timothy Potts has made his first major purchase as the new Getty Museum director: He bought Lieven van Lathem's illuminated manuscript Roman de Gillion de Trazegnies for $6.2 million at Sotheby's Wednesday night in London. The manuscript includes eight half-page miniatures, like the one shown in detail above. There are only three other manuscripts containing this story of a nobleman's adventures in Egypt. In a statement, Potts called it a “richly illustrated manuscript by the greatest illuminator of the Flemish High Renaissance.” In an interview with the L.A. Times for a story in the Dec. 9 Arts & Books section, he described manuscripts as a potential growth area for the Getty, while praising the current collection.
NEWS
November 15, 2009 | Meris Lutz; David Ng; Mary MacVean; Richard Verrier
The subject of women's rights in the Middle East is contentious. Sensational media coverage of honor killings and child brides equates religious conservatism with gender inequality, incensing Western feminists on the one hand and provoking regional backlashes on the other. The reality is far more nuanced, according to the 2009 Global Gender Gap Report released in late October by the World Economic Forum, which ranks countries based on women's economic participation, educational attainment, health and political empowerment.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2013 | By Steve Appleford
The visual history of the natural and civilized world runs 125 years deep in the archives of National Geographic magazine. It's a history also of photojournalism, of social documentary and startling wildlife imagery, and is home to a vast ocean of work from some of the most daring and accomplished photographers of the era. "The Power of Photography: National Geographic 125 Years," an exhibition now at the Annenberg Space for Photography through April...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
No one should be surprised that the Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts, which began its inaugural season Friday night with an appearance by the Martha Graham Dance Company, is a high-end venue. It's in Beverly Hills. A pop-up Salvatore Ferragamo store is its first attraction, just in case you find that your shoes suddenly feel out of fashion for the promenade from the entrance in the historic post office and past impressive donated contemporary art to the new Bram Goldsmith Theater.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|