Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCurbside
IN THE NEWS

Curbside

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1989
The Church of the Nazarene is reaching out into the South-Central Los Angeles community with its "Church on Wheels." The mobile chapel is being used for children's Bible classes, puppet shows, Sunday services and inner-city ministries. Once a library bookmobile, the van has been outfitted with wooden pews that seat up to 35 adults or 50 children.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz and Michael Finnegan
Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti will hear the public's questions and complaints in person during a "Parking Day" event Friday at a pop-up, curbside desk in Boyle Heights. Garcetti's event is part of what he describes as a back-to-basics push to make City Hall more transparent, efficient and "customer-friendly. " Garcetti has opened his doors to constituents twice for in-person "office hours," once downtown and once in Van Nuys. The mayor has also walked door to door in Venice to answer questions from residents on a variety of topics.
Advertisement
MAGAZINE
January 7, 2001 | LESLEE KOMAIKO
The Valettes, a mostly female valet parking operation based in Redondo Beach, have been parking cars since 1978. "Quite honestly," owner Maureen Sullivan says, "women are better drivers. We don't speed. We don't race. We don't take them on joy rides. And it looks nice having ladies out there." For the front-line Valettes, though, the job can have its downsides: Puncture wounds: The Valettes hand fresh roses to departing guests, and spend their down time removing thorns from the stems.
NATIONAL
October 31, 2011 | By Alexa Vaughn, Washington Bureau
Privately operated "curbside" buses are seven times as likely to be in a fatal accident as other interstate buses, according to a report released by the National Transportation Safety Board. Curbside buses pick up and drop off at their own designated curb spots instead of main transportation terminals, the way larger bus companies do. Their low fares have helped make them the fastest-growing mode of transportation since 2005, according to the report — something that has prompted larger motorcoach companies such as Greyhound and Coach USA to create curbside bus subsidiaries like BoltBus and Megabus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz and Michael Finnegan
Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti will hear the public's questions and complaints in person during a "Parking Day" event Friday at a pop-up, curbside desk in Boyle Heights. Garcetti's event is part of what he describes as a back-to-basics push to make City Hall more transparent, efficient and "customer-friendly. " Garcetti has opened his doors to constituents twice for in-person "office hours," once downtown and once in Van Nuys. The mayor has also walked door to door in Venice to answer questions from residents on a variety of topics.
NATIONAL
October 31, 2011 | By Alexa Vaughn, Washington Bureau
Privately operated "curbside" buses are seven times as likely to be in a fatal accident as other interstate buses, according to a report released by the National Transportation Safety Board. Curbside buses pick up and drop off at their own designated curb spots instead of main transportation terminals, the way larger bus companies do. Their low fares have helped make them the fastest-growing mode of transportation since 2005, according to the report — something that has prompted larger motorcoach companies such as Greyhound and Coach USA to create curbside bus subsidiaries like BoltBus and Megabus.
MAGAZINE
February 11, 2007
The photos of curbside gardens ("Curb Appeal," by Ann Herold, Style, Jan. 21) are lovely, but in most cities curbside strips are city property, not that of the adjacent homeowner. These strips are what animal-control ordinances mean when they require dog owners to "curb" their pets (and to immediately remove waste). Your magazine exists to celebrate our dense megalopolis and the arrangements we constantly make for people with diverse interests to get along. You might ask yourselves whether free advertising for hostile signs aimed at dog owners and asserting squatters' rights for gardeners on public land are good ideas.
NEWS
August 6, 1992
City residents will be able to sort plastic bottles, glass and newspaper from their garbage and have it picked up at their curbside when the city's recycling program goes into effect in the next six months. The City Council awarded the bid for the recycling project Tuesday to Waste Management of California Inc., the lowest of three bids for the seven-year contract.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1990 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Peter Tobias sat in the back row of a federal courtroom in downtown San Diego Thursday, trying to decide if courthouse decorum allowed him to cheer, clap his hands and yell at the top of his lungs. After all, a judge had just rendered a passionate decision that Tobias and an entourage of migrant advocates had been anxiously awaiting--granting a temporary restraining order against a curbside hiring ban in Encinitas many felt was an infringement of the right to free speech.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1987
Responding to James L. Schefter and his odyssey, I, too, have had similar experiences until relocating to Pacific Palisades. Here, it appears, the city has decided to give homeowners color-coded collectors to be placed curbside every other week for the collection of glass, newspaper and aluminum cans. It's now a pleasure to be responsible. WILLIAM RING Pacific Palisades
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2011 | Martha Groves
In Beverly Hills, a DMV agent confiscates a disabled parking placard from a woman leaving a fitness center. In downtown Los Angeles, a motorist launches into a rant about "evil" meter readers after acknowledging that he's using someone else's disabled parking pass. And in neighborhoods near UCLA, 17 students are stopped and questioned as they scurry to class, their cars parked in restricted zones, disabled parking badges dangling from their rear-view mirrors. Fraudulent use of disabled parking placards -- those blue or red badges that allow motorists to park for free or in specially reserved spaces -- has exploded in the last decade, according to state motor vehicle officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2009 | Maria L. La Ganga
Tom Bates stands in his pantry, grinning like a boy on Christmas morning with his loot spread out in front of him. There's a vase half full of used rubber bands destined for return to the newspaper carrier. A pile of hangers will go back to the cleaners. A bin of scraped and dried coffee filters awaits the artist down the street, who incorporates them into her work. Used coffee grounds fill a plastic bag on the kitchen counter. Bates collects them for the compost-making worms in his garage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2009 | Mitchell Landsberg and Ari B. Bloomekatz
It was hard to find a cynic in Southern California on Tuesday. Not downtown, where tears streamed down Alesia Adams' face as President Barack Obama finished reciting the oath of office, projected on 15 massive screens at the new L.A. Live entertainment district. "Thank you, Lord," she whispered, as her husband, James, tightly embraced her and their two daughters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2008 | Alexandra Zavis, Zavis is a Times staff writer.
The clash between letter carriers and man's best friend is the butt of many jokes. But for one block in Hawthorne, it is no laughing matter. The U.S. Postal Service is refusing to deliver mail to residents' front doors in a cul-de-sac on 134th Place at Doty Avenue, where it says aggressive dogs, including a boxer mix and a Chihuahua, are putting its employees at risk. "This is the biggest threat they face out there," said Larry Dozier, a postal service spokesman for the Los Angeles area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2008 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Times Staff Writer
By dinner time on most nights in downtown Culver City, a steady flow of traffic fills the city's three public parking garages and scores of metered spaces, spilling out into residential streets. It is evidence of the community's cultural and culinary renaissance, which includes galleries, shops, wine bars and upscale restaurants. But there's a price to be paid for this commercial revival: more congestion, cranky locals and frustrated consumers who can't quite understand what's happened to the once-quiet town.
OPINION
April 19, 2008
Re "Curbing East L.A. taco trucks," April 14 It is disheartening to see small businesses attack even smaller businesses. Taco trucks meet a need in communities where taking a whole family out to dinner can be a luxury. It is unfortunate that L.A. County supervisors would give in to pressures from the business community and increase restrictions on taco vendors. Rather than valuing hard work toward self-sufficiency, the supervisors are discouraging small immigrant businesses. I would like to see investment in these small businesses that teaches strategies for long-term success, including standardized safety methods to reduce food-borne illnesses.
NEWS
June 22, 1989
The cost of trash collection will be increased $1.20 a month for residents under a rate schedule that was adopted by the Pasadena Board of Directors this week and becomes effective July 1. The new monthly rates will be $18.70 for single-family homes with basic back-yard collection service and $12.69 for customers with automated collection at curbside. The rate increases will pay for higher salaries and other operational costs, higher dumping fees and expansion of city recycling programs.
TRAVEL
June 4, 2006
I was surprised when checking in curbside for a United Airlines flight at LAX to see a sign that said $2 per bag ["Demise of the Optional Gratuity," May 21]. And I had to insist on receiving change. I was equally surprised in Denver when I checked in curbside for a Frontier Airlines flight with three bags including skis and boot bag and was told that gratuities were not accepted and that there was no charge. DON ALSCHULER Los Angeles WITH everything in place for my July vacation, I found two articles in the May 21 Travel section very pertinent.
NATIONAL
January 28, 2008 | Ashley Powers, Times Staff Writer
Jed Matzke sets out each day to guide love-struck couples to happily ever after. It's not as romantic as it sounds. The first stop in Las Vegas for brides and grooms is the Clark County Marriage Bureau, at the corner of Clark and 3rd, down the street from a bail bondsman and the county jail. Matzke hangs out six days a week at the Pit, as some call the corner, smoking Marlboros, sucking Werther's candies, waiting for his shot.
REAL ESTATE
September 16, 2007 | Diane Wedner, Times Staff Writer
Bus benches just don't get much respect. Some are slept on; some are defaced by graffiti. Coffee and soda are spilled on them. Names are engraved. And yet . . . In today's Web-surfing, GPS-navigating, digital camera-snapping, blog-dominated universe, the lowly bus bench is for some real estate agents a beacon of marketing optimism, a way to stand out amid the clutter of high-tech ads.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|