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WORLD
August 20, 2009 | Robyn Dixon
Day two, it turns out, is the worst. When the power goes off in my neighborhood, it takes awhile for the consequences to seep in. So, OK, no Facebook, no Twitter, no e-mail, no Google, no hourly news check. No computer. No fax, printer or photocopier. Worse: No stove, no reading lights. No bathroom light, which brings me to . . . no hot water. Then, more dire consequences. In one of the world's worst crime cities, no alarm, no lighting around the house. And not to mention that it's cold with no heater on a wintry day in Johannesburg.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Egypt roils with revolution, Edward Snowden has become the Scarlet Pimpernel of privacy and a new study reveals that, even though Americans are exercising more, we're still fat, which is really unfair. Yet for weeks we've been bombarded with minute-by-minute televised coverage of the George Zimmerman trial. Testimony is parsed, questions are raised - "Why was his shirt not rumpled?" - witnesses reviewed like contestants on "American Idol," and every day sees way too much footage of Zimmerman, moon-faced and unsmiling in another suit.
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NEWS
March 16, 1994 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The test did not seem difficult. Anyone who keeps up with the news ought to know that Boris N. Yeltsin is president of Russia and Boutros Boutros-Ghali is secretary general of the United Nations, right? But Americans failed badly, faring far worse than their neighbors and West European allies in a survey of eight countries released Tuesday by the Times Mirror Center for the People & the Press.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - Questions about assimilation, security and ideology have been front-and-center in the American consciousness since two men with Chechen roots were identified as suspects in the Boston Marathon bombings last week. But globe-trotting director Mira Nair has been hunkering down in these culture-clash issues for years - with her latest film, "The Reluctant Fundamentalist," perhaps the most pertinent of all. As she watched the events of the last 10 days unfold, Nair found herself feeling both disheartened by what she saw and struck by her own film's unfortunate timeliness.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1990 | KEVIN THOMAS
Ralph Aryck's "Current Events" is so engaging, provocative and original it deserves a regular run instead of the weekend matinees beginning Saturday at the Nuart. Rightly described as an essay rather than a documentary, "Current Events" succeeds on several levels. First, it is a serious attempt to go beyond the evening news and provide a greater sense of what's going on in such tragic locales as Nicaragua and Ethiopia.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Egypt roils with revolution, Edward Snowden has become the Scarlet Pimpernel of privacy and a new study reveals that, even though Americans are exercising more, we're still fat, which is really unfair. Yet for weeks we've been bombarded with minute-by-minute televised coverage of the George Zimmerman trial. Testimony is parsed, questions are raised - "Why was his shirt not rumpled?" - witnesses reviewed like contestants on "American Idol," and every day sees way too much footage of Zimmerman, moon-faced and unsmiling in another suit.
NEWS
October 22, 1992 | FRANCES HALPERN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A group of high school students were interviewed recently on television about their reaction to the presidential debates. They were also asked where they get their information about current events. Among the 12 students who answered, one read a local newspaper and another Newsweek magazine. The others complained they were too busy to read and said they listen to the radio in their cars or watch news on television. Need more cheering up?
NEWS
March 11, 1993 | SHEARLEAN DUKE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
IRVINE--Simon Schafer wrote to Chelsea Clinton shortly after Chelsea's father became President. "I thought she might be sad after she left all her friends in Arkansas," Simon said. Jonathan Arditti wrote to say that he was glad there was a child and a cat in the White House and that he hoped Chelsea wouldn't get lost in her new home. "Try not to get mixed up with your room and another room," he advised.
OPINION
September 11, 2012 | By Cara Mia DiMassa
My family and I marked the 10th anniversary of 9/11 last year with a ceremony at the Los Angeles Fire Academy. Our daughters marveled at the enormous fire engine ladders, lifted toward the sky to proudly display an American flag. The older one took pictures with my phone of a twisted piece of steel, a piece of the World Trade Center, pictures she would later share with her second-grade class. They listened, as best they could, to speeches by the mayor and other politicians. They stood at attention as a bagpiper played taps.
BOOKS
July 2, 1995 | Robert Dawidoff, Robert Dawidoff chairs the history program at the Claremont Graduate School
Thomas Jefferson and James Madison met in October, 1776, in Williamsburg, Va. Thirty-three-year-old Jefferson was already an acknowledged American phenomenon, author of the Declaration of Independence; in Madison's words, "a walking library" and a man with whom "the Genius of Philosophy ever walked hand in hand." Madison, eight years younger, was an equal if lower-key prodigy. His principal accomplishment to date had been the shaping of the guarantee of religious liberty in the Virginia Declaration of Rights, and he would be a principal architect of the Constitution and especially the Bill of Rights.
OPINION
September 11, 2012 | By Cara Mia DiMassa
My family and I marked the 10th anniversary of 9/11 last year with a ceremony at the Los Angeles Fire Academy. Our daughters marveled at the enormous fire engine ladders, lifted toward the sky to proudly display an American flag. The older one took pictures with my phone of a twisted piece of steel, a piece of the World Trade Center, pictures she would later share with her second-grade class. They listened, as best they could, to speeches by the mayor and other politicians. They stood at attention as a bagpiper played taps.
NATIONAL
August 24, 2012 | By James Rainey, Los Angeles Times
Facebook and Internet portals such as Google and Yahoo increasingly provide Americans their gateway for news, but the bulk of voters who catch up on current events daily turn to traditional sources, particularly local television stations, according to a nationwide poll. Traditional news sources on TV and in print also remain more trusted than the burgeoning alternative ecosystem of blogs, late-night comedy shows and social media outlets, the USC Annenberg/Los Angeles Times Poll on Politics and the Press found.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
I didn't expect much from "Brand X," FX's new "talk show" starring British comedian Russell Brand, and yet I got even less. With his disheveled locks and quasi-bohemian dress, Brand is as much a personality as a performer, having managed to not only survive but leverage a medley of dysfunctions (including ADD, heroin addiction, alcoholism, bulimia, divorcing Katy Perry) to create an image of the bleary-eyed, often low-brow but sometimes surprisingly literate scapegrace. It's a character that has granted him a successful film career - "Get Him to the Greek,""Arthur"and, most recently, "Rock of Ages" - bestselling books, stand-up shows and awards hosting gigs.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2011 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"I got a phone call from a friend," Peter Sagal told me recently, remembering a day in 1997, "who said, 'I know these people who are putting together a new show on public radio. They're looking for funny people who read a lot of newspapers, and I thought of you.'" FOR THE RECORD: Peter Sagal: An earlier version of the photo caption on this article about Peter Sagal and "Wait, Wait...Don't Tell Me" misspelled Carl Kasell's last name as Kassel. That was "Wait, Wait ... Don't Tell Me," the popular NPR current-events comedy panel show Sagal has hosted for nearly 14 years.
SPORTS
December 10, 2011 | Bill Plaschke
For 18 long months, it disappeared. In the time it takes Albert Pujols to go yard, it is back. With the power of a Dwight Howard dunk, the strength of an Arte Moreno check and the brightness of a Magic Johnson smile, the trademark buzz of Los Angeles sports has come home for the holidays. For more than a year after the Lakers' victory in Game 7 of the 2010 NBA Finals, our sports community endured a hangover that left us aching and sprawled across a landscape filled with empty seats, empty jerseys, empty coaches' offices and empty promises.
NEWS
November 21, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
A new survey of New Jersey voters comes to a provocative conclusion: Fox News viewers tend to be less informed about current events than those who don't watch any news at all. Fairleigh Dickinson University recently questioned 612 adults in New Jersey about how they get their news, offering as options traditional outlets like newspapers and local and national television news, or blogs, websites and even Comedy Central's "The Daily Show. " They then asked a series of factual questions about the major events of the last year, from the "Arab Spring" to the Republican race for president.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1997
Current events have us between Iraq and a hard place. PAUL MABIE Fullerton
NEWS
August 13, 1991 | Associated Press
A businessman was sentenced Monday to life in prison for the stabbing deaths of his former girlfriend and a television humorist he believed was having an affair with her. William Pawlyk, a onetime manager of a Boeing Co. subsidiary, was convicted of aggravated first-degree murder on July 2. Larry Sturholm, who commented on current events on a nightly TV news program, and Debra Sweiger, a nurse, were killed July 31, 1989, in her home.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2011
Allah, Liberty and Love The Courage to Reconcile Faith and Freedom Irshad Manji Simon & Schuster: $25 The author looks at the contentious world views sometimes dividing Muslims and non-Muslims and suggests solutions to transcend those differences. (June) An Anatomy of Addiction Sigmund Freud, William Halsted and the Miracle Drug Cocaine Howard Markel Pantheon: $27.95 Markel recounts the decades-long use of cocaine by Freud, father of modern psychoanalysis, and by Halsted, father of modern surgery.
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