Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCurricula
IN THE NEWS

Curricula

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1992 | JAMES M. GOMEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing a dramatic rise in gang violence among adolescents, gang experts and county school officials urged teachers and school districts Saturday to incorporate anti-gang lessons into everyday curricula. "The kids need to be surrounded by prevention messages," said Nina J. Winn, director of the county Department of Education's Safe School Projects. "If I talk to them and you talk to them and the teachers talk to them, then something has to sink in."
Advertisement
NEWS
June 30, 1991 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The special needs of Latinos must be part of a national education policy in order to close a widening economic gap between them and the rest of the population, experts agreed Saturday at a gathering of Latino leaders. "In the nation's education reform debate, Hispanics appear nowhere," RAND Corp. policy analyst Georges Vernez complained during the closing day of the National Assn. of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials convention in Anaheim.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1991 | TONY MARCANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The debate over whether bilingual education is necessary is essentially dead and educators should now focus their efforts on how to implement new bilingual curricula, state Supt. of Public Instruction Bill Honig said Friday. In a speech at the annual conference of the California Assn.
NEWS
November 1, 1990 | Responses gathered by Brandi Winemiller (Bolsa Grande), Blythe Latimer (Cypress), Lauren Walden (El Modena), Michael Spivak (Huntington Beach), Shelly Insheiwhe (Los Amigos), Beth Mueller (Rancho Alamitos), Asra Hashmy (Rosary), Brooke Lyons (St. Margaret's), Brian Martin (Servite), Rachel Cochrane (Sunny Hills) and Claudine Ko (University)
With graduation and college admissions requirements becoming more strict each year, high school students don't have much flexibility when it comes to enrolling in elective classes--those courses taken primarily for interest's sake. Hot Topics wonders, "What class should be offered at your school that is not in the curriculum?" "A modern dance class because it is really embarrassing going to dances when you don't know how to dance."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1990 | ALLEN E. KOENIG, Allen E. Koenig is president of Chapman College in Orange.
A fraternity "slave sale" with members in blackface. Racial insults scrawled on dormitory walls. Anti-Semitic slurs in the campus newspaper and leaflets promoting the Ku Klux Klan in the student union. These are not scenes from another age; they are the disturbing legacy of the 1980s, when incidents of bigotry on campuses across the nation increased dramatically, including in Orange County.
NEWS
October 1, 1989 | EDITORS OF HARPERS MAGAZINE
Last year, an academic dispute about which books college freshmen should read touched off an unexpected, passionate national debate. The argument turned on the expansion of what professors called the "canon" to include not only the masterpieces of Plato, Dante and Shakespeare but also works representative of other traditions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1988 | TED APPEL, United Press International
Slowly but surely, high schools have added a controversial new subject to the three Rs: Frank discussions on ways to avoid the deadly AIDS virus. Despite vocal opposition from moral crusaders and historically weak guidance from state educators, local school districts are disseminating a growing body of knowledge about the AIDS virus to children in the classroom.
NEWS
December 19, 1987 | LARRY GORDON, Times Education Writer
Some enrolled because their fathers served in Vietnam and they wanted to understand their parents better. Some enrolled because they had fought in Vietnam and wanted to understand themselves better. Others were in the class to figure out this city's burgeoning community of Southeast Asian refugees, human proof of war's upheaval.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1987 | BILL BILLITER, Times Staff Writer
Preschools and kindergartens have many problems. That was the message as scores of witnesses testified in Orange County on Tuesday before a state Department of Education task force on school readiness. The panel, meeting in Costa Mesa, heard parents and teachers testify that too much is expected of toddlers in many cases; that kindergarten curricula are often bad; that gifted children need special help. The task force was appointed by state Supt.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|